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Patrick_Skelton
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The Giver

I recently re-read this classic young adult masterpiece. What a great read! Really loved the dystopian "Brave New World" type of society in the story...as well as the open ending. Has anyone read the other 2 books in the series? I believe they are Messenger and something else...can't remember off the top of my head.

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Colleen_Rose
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Re: The Giver

This is one of those books I love, though I get angry everytime I read it.  I love the vivid description of the apple.  I remember reading the book and waiting for the hook, then BOOM the apple.  Kind of reminds me of the Handmaids Tale where you spend half the book wondering how the society became what it was.

Colleen

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Sardonicus
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Re: The Giver


Patrick_Skelton wrote:

I recently re-read this classic . . .


 

Heh heh heh!:smileyvery-happy:

It seems you've the hang of it now, Patrick.:smileyhappy:

 

 

 

The people who live in a golden age usually go around complaining how yellow everything looks.

- Randall Jarrell








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swan480
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Re: The Giver

[ Edited ]

I have to thank you, Patrick...  I've read The Giver a handful of times and it's one of my favorites, but I had no idea there were sequels.  When I saw your post I looked it up, and they are Gathering Blue and Messenger.

 

 

Gathering Blue  

 

 

Messenger

  

 

 

It's funny, in the description of Messenger, there is a comment that readers didn't like the open endings in The Giver and Gathering Blue, but at least in The Giver, I think that's one of the most powerful parts of the book.

 

Thanks for alerting me to the existence of these two books -- it looks like I have yet another couple of books to add to my "to be read" list!

gqb
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gqb
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Re: The Giver

I also have enjoyed Lowry's The Giver many times.  I wouldn't necessarily call Gathering Blue a sequel.  I'll have to check out Messenger.  I have not read it.

 

Another good  YA book about a different society is Margaret Peterson Haddix's Among the Hidden.

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Sandikal
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Re: The Giver

I am so very old.  I only read "The Giver" a couple of years ago.  I kept hearing it referred to as a "classic" and couldn't understand why I hadn't read it as a youth.  Turns out it was published in 1993 when my daughter was 10!  So, while it's an excellent book, it's not a classic. 

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swan480
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Re: The Giver

I don't think it's necessarily the age of the book that makes it a classic.  Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird was considered a classic by the time I got to high school, and it wasn't much older then than The Giver is now.

 

If I had to define what made a classic, I'd say it's something that has the ability to mean something to a wide range of readers and to make an impact, and longevity in the literary canon.  The book is taught in public schools and in college-level literature and education programs, is read pretty widely, and continues to impact people nearly 20 years after it was published, so I do think The Giver does satisfy these conditions.

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Patrick_Skelton
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Re: The Giver

I never had the chance to read The Giver in school...but I really enjoyed it just the same as an adult.

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aharey
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Re: The Giver

I've read all three books. They are some of my favorite young adult books- very well written. It's very interesting to compare Giver to Gathering Blue, because they are such totally different societies. The Messenger ties them both together. I highly recommend them- very thought provoking!

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swan480
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Re: The Giver

 


aharey wrote:

It's very interesting to compare Giver to Gathering Blue, because they are such totally different societies. The Messenger ties them both together. I highly recommend them- very thought provoking!


So that's how they relate.  Thanks!  I'm looking forward to reading the other two.

 

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Patrick_Skelton
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Re: The Giver

Just finished Gathering Blue.  Awesome!

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Ya_Ya
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Re: The Giver

 


swan480 wrote:

 

If I had to define what made a classic, I'd say it's something that has the ability to mean something to a wide range of readers and to make an impact, and longevity in the literary canon.  The book is taught in public schools and in college-level literature and education programs, is read pretty widely, and continues to impact people nearly 20 years after it was published, so I do think The Giver does satisfy these conditions.


I disagree.  In  another 20 years if all of the above is true, I'll agree.  Personally, to really be a classic, I believe a book has to do all of the above over multiple generations.  Of course, I'm just me, but I think that to call a book that has only proven itself through one generation a classic is premature.   

 

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Sandikal
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Re: The Giver

 


Ya_Ya wrote:

 


swan480 wrote:

 

If I had to define what made a classic, I'd say it's something that has the ability to mean something to a wide range of readers and to make an impact, and longevity in the literary canon.  The book is taught in public schools and in college-level literature and education programs, is read pretty widely, and continues to impact people nearly 20 years after it was published, so I do think The Giver does satisfy these conditions.


I disagree.  In  another 20 years if all of the above is true, I'll agree.  Personally, to really be a classic, I believe a book has to do all of the above over multiple generations.  Of course, I'm just me, but I think that to call a book that has only proven itself through one generation a classic is premature.   

 


I agree.  I think a book needs to be at least 25 years old to be a "classic".  Even then, it would be a "modern classic".  I read To Kill a Mockingbird when I was in 3rd grade.  At that point it had been around less than 10 years.  It was a great book that had a profound life-long effect on me.  However, it was not a classic at that point.   Even when I re-read it in my late teens, it was a great book, but not a classic.  It's definitely a classic now.  Give The Giver another decade to see if it endures or if it gets displaced by something else, like The Hunger Games.