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pcbiker
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎02-13-2011

eBook Pricing

Being anewbie on the Nook Color, I was enjoying reading and the ease at which I could purchase books.  Now that the pricing has changed, I have to question my decision to venture into the eReader market..  With eBook pricing being higher than the hardback edition, I feel my eBook purchasing will decrease if not stop altogether.

 

Examples: (Two from the Biography section)

 

Known and Unknown Donal Rumsfeld Onlin price $19.10 eBook $19.99

 

In the Blink of an Eye Michael Waltrip $14.93 eBook $14.99

 

 

Is anyone purchasing eBooks that cost more than the hardback version?

 

Hopefully the publishers will wake up.

 

I'm glad the Nook works with the local libraries. 

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bklvr896
Posts: 4,802
Registered: ‎12-31-2009
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Re: eBook Pricing

 


pcbiker wrote:

Being anewbie on the Nook Color, I was enjoying reading and the ease at which I could purchase books.  Now that the pricing has changed, I have to question my decision to venture into the eReader market..  With eBook pricing being higher than the hardback edition, I feel my eBook purchasing will decrease if not stop altogether.

 

Examples: (Two from the Biography section)

 

Known and Unknown Donal Rumsfeld Onlin price $19.10 eBook $19.99

 

In the Blink of an Eye Michael Waltrip $14.93 eBook $14.99

 

 

Is anyone purchasing eBooks that cost more than the hardback version?

 

Hopefully the publishers will wake up.

 

I'm glad the Nook works with the local libraries. 


 

Yes, they are.  Last week or so, The Donald Rumsfeld books was in the top 20 best selling eBooks on B&N.

 

Fall of Giants, Ken Follett, at $19.99 was in the top 10/20 best selling eBooks for months at that price, higher than the HC.  I don't know that the publishers are going to "wake up".  I looked at the top 20 best selling eBooks according to the NYT, and 9 of those books were $12.99 or higher, so prices don't seem to be stopping people from buying the books.

 

I may buy it higher than the HC, if it's a book I would have purchased in HC anyway.  I buy the book for the content and the story, not so much for the format, so as long as it's close priced to the other formats, I'll take the convenience of the eBook over a dollar or so and a print book.

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sirwillard
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Registered: ‎06-10-2010
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Re: eBook Pricing

"Now that the pricing has changed"...

 

When did the pricing change? There's not been anything new by way of pricing that I know of since the Agency Model came to be, which predated the NOOK color by some time.

 

There really aren't that many examples of eBooks being priced higher, and these are very bad examples. $0.70 and $0.07 price differences aren't something that many people are going to care about.

 

In any event, if the books sell at a given price, no matter what that price is, then the market has spoken and that's the price it's going to sell at. The only thing I see to complain about here is Agency pricing preventing the retailer from setting prices for promotional purposes.

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Allem-o
Posts: 98
Registered: ‎04-06-2010

Re: eBook Pricing

 


bklvr896 wrote:

 



 

 

I may buy it higher than the HC, if it's a book I would have purchased in HC anyway.  I buy the book for the content and the story, not so much for the format, so as long as it's close priced to the other formats, I'll take the convenience of the eBook over a dollar or so and a print book.


 

+1^^^^ What he said...

 

This is the same place where that I have settled to.  And there are still plenty of ebooks below the $15 and $10 threshold that I like to be at, for me to read.  But for a book like Rumsfeld that I want to read, I'll pay the $20 price. 

 

That said, if it is not an agency model book and B&N is significantly higher then other retailers, then I'll buy from them and sideload, or even hit the library site for a copy.  I'm a free market guy, so if B&N wants to price themselves out on certain books..so be it.  However I've also seen B&N have lower prices on some books then the other sites, so in the end it generally all balances out.  IMHO.

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ChelMcQ
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Re: eBook Pricing

I refuse to spend more on an Ebook than a dead-tree book.

 

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bklvr896
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Re: eBook Pricing

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ChelMcQ
Posts: 22
Registered: ‎07-19-2009

Re: eBook Pricing

 


bklvr896 wrote:

 


ChelMcQ wrote:

I refuse to spend more on an Ebook than a dead-tree book.

 


Why?

 


Because I believe that part of the cost of a book should be the time, labor, and materials necessary to create it. A book in electronic format should require less time/labor/materials, and therefore, should cost less.

 

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Ya_Ya
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Re: eBook Pricing

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swan480
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Re: eBook Pricing

 


ChelMcQ wrote:

 

Because I believe that part of the cost of a book should be the time, labor, and materials necessary to create it. A book in electronic format should require less time/labor/materials, and therefore, should cost less.

 


 

Um...  Why do you think that ebooks should cost less?  Publishing houses don't have to print, warehouse, and ship them, but that's actually a small fraction of the cost of publishing a book.  Editing, formatting, cover design, writer's royalties/advances, and office rent/electricity/etc. still needs to come out of the price of the ebook.  Just because the book is digital doesn't mean the publisher lets their entire staff go.  There's a nice breakdown of why ebooks don't cost that much less, here:

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/01/business/media/01ebooks.html?_r=1&partner=rss&emc=rss

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drafnel
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Re: eBook Pricing

 


swan480 wrote:
Um...  Why do you think that ebooks should cost less?

Can't share 'em, sell 'em, or give 'em away.

 

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Ya_Ya
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Re: eBook Pricing

 


drafnel wrote:

 


swan480 wrote:
Um...  Why do you think that ebooks should cost less?

Can't share 'em, sell 'em, or give 'em away.

 


 

This is not why ebooks should be priced lower.  This is why you want to pay less.

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sygram
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Re: eBook Pricing

 


swan480 wrote:

 


ChelMcQ wrote:

 

Because I believe that part of the cost of a book should be the time, labor, and materials necessary to create it. A book in electronic format should require less time/labor/materials, and therefore, should cost less.

 


 

Um...  Why do you think that ebooks should cost less?  Publishing houses don't have to print, warehouse, and ship them, but that's actually a small fraction of the cost of publishing a book.  Editing, formatting, cover design, writer's royalties/advances, and office rent/electricity/etc. still needs to come out of the price of the ebook.  Just because the book is digital doesn't mean the publisher lets their entire staff go.  There's a nice breakdown of why ebooks don't cost that much less, here:

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/01/business/media/01ebooks.html?_r=1&partner=rss&emc=rss


I've seen far more eBooks with extremely poor editing and formatting than DTBs.  I'm not talking about the PubIt books, but books released by the major publishers.  If they treat the eBook the same as the DTB I wouldn't complain as much about the pricing, but they don't, and it shows.

 


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drafnel
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Re: eBook Pricing

 


Ya_Ya wrote:

 


drafnel wrote:

 


swan480 wrote:
Um...  Why do you think that ebooks should cost less?

Can't share 'em, sell 'em, or give 'em away.

 


 

This is not why ebooks should be priced lower.  This is why you want to pay less.


 

What's the difference?

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Ya_Ya
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Re: eBook Pricing

[ Edited ]

 


drafnel wrote:

 

What's the difference?


Really?  That's what you have?  I expected better.

 

What you want to pay is subjective, based on the value you think an object holds.  The way an object should be priced is objective, based on highest price that the market bears.

 

You'll call it semantics, but it's not.

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drafnel
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Re: eBook Pricing

 


Ya_Ya wrote:

 


drafnel wrote:

 

What's the difference?


 

Really?  That's what you have?  I expected better.

 

What you want to pay is subjective, based on the value you think an object holds.  The way an object should be priced is objective, based on highest price that the market bears.

 

You'll call it semantics, but it's not.


 

Well, you must agree this time that it was a subjective question wasn't it?  "Why do you think that ebooks should cost less?"

 

Ans: I think ebooks should cost less because I can't share 'em, sell ...

 

The electronic product has been stripped of rights that the physical copy retains.  I don't like that.  I am not willing to pay as much for the product with fewer rights even though it provides a little more convenience.  That's all.

 

I also have little sympathy for publishers since I suspect that they would be able to make up the difference in lost revenue per book by selling more books.  I would think that this would necessarily have to happen (the selling of more books) if the same number of people were going to read a given book, since the electronic version can't be shared and provides no opportunity for a secondary market.  So, some people who would have purchased from the secondary market, would not be able to, and also would be more willing to purchase from the first tier market at a lower price.  But it's not my business.  I just hope one day someone will do for books what iTunes/AmazonMusic has done for music.

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bklvr896
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Re: eBook Pricing

 


drafnel wrote:

 


  So, some people who would have purchased from the secondary market, would not be able to, and also would be more willing to purchase from the first tier market at a lower price.  But it's not my business.  I just hope one day someone will do for books what iTunes/AmazonMusic has done for music.


 

What, basically put everyone else out of business?  Then we'll all have to have Kindles or iPads to read books.

 

I really should just keep out of this.  This subject has been discussed to death.  No one is going to change their minds.

 

That said, I'm going to express my opinion.  I don't care that I can't lend it, (actually I do lend it to the one person I used to share books with), I dont' care about selling books (the one time I tried, I got like a $1.50 per paperback or something, so totally not worth the effort).  I kept most of my books anyway.  I really don't have much a problem with the pricing, I have a number of eBooks I've purchased at $12.99.  If the book (meaning the story) isn't worth it to me, then I don't buy it until it the paperback is released and it comes down in price.

 

I'm done, maybe I'll take my own advice and just stay out of these discussions from now on.  Well, probably not, but hey, I can try.

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jaquellae
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Re: eBook Pricing

*dips toe in and tests the water* I think the value of an ebook vs a dtb book is very subjective. For me, the trade off of the convenience of an ebook (ie. reading on my phone/ereader/ipod touch, carrying around a large library of books on those devices) is an even trade with the advantages of a dtb book (sell/give away, not having to worry about format/drm/etc). As long as the ebook is around the same price of the dtb book, I don't miind paying for it. I do realize that mileage varies with this, and others are perfectly within there rights to set their own value on things.

 

Publishers have every right to price ebooks at what the market will bear. That doesn't mean I will pay $20 for an ebook, or won't shop around for the best price for non-Agency titles. I also hope one day for a better DRM system, if the publishers insist on having one. I choose a nook because the vast majority of my ebook library I've accumulated over the years could be read by it. I still have about 80 ebooks in DRM'd Mobipocket format that I can't (legally) read on it. At least my old Palm is still alive, so I have access to read them if I want.

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RSC_Nook
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Re: eBook Pricing

Do folks realize this is a freaking barely 2 year old (if that) market?  eBooks are more expensive because the POPULATION buying them is still so very small.  it doesn't matter if it costs less to produce if there are less people buying them.. for example (all made up)

 

DTB ='s $100.00 fixed costs and $1.00 variable cost to make, they sell it for $1.10, make 10 cents profit.  need to sell 1,000 books before recoop fixed costs

 

eBook cost $100 fixed cost, $0.98 to make, they sell it for $1.08, still need the same 1,000 purchases.  BUT what if they only have 750 people buying?  then they need to sell it for $13.3 cent more, or $1.11

 

how is it that hard to understand????  you MUST take into the equation the number of customers, you can't just say 'hey, it is cheaper'.

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Desert_Brat
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Re: eBook Pricing

 


RSC_Nook wrote:

Do folks realize this is a freaking barely 2 year old (if that) market?


Actually, Project Gutenberg began making portable documents (e-books are an electronic form of printed material) for a gadget called the Dynabook. This was intended to be a personal, portable computer that could be used for reading documents. A forerunner of the notebook computer, if you will.

 

Libraries have been providing electronic books since 1998. Archos started out making devices for libraries that had electronic or audio books on them. The library could "refill" these by sending the units in to the company, who would send another shipment of the Archos Readers out with a different set of books or audio files that libraries could then check out to their patrons. It was sort of like having a jukebox, where the company would rotate the records. As a matter of fact, one of the early audio book players was called the Jukebox.

 

These electronic "books" were around a long time before even Adobe got into the game with their pdf format. I can remember downloading these. One complete book was comprised of several zip files. Back then PKZip was the best thing going and even it couldn't adequately compress the files, but it was better than nothing. So they broke things down into multiple files.

 

A lifelong reader, now may my life be long enough to catch up on my reading!
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RSC_Nook
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Re: eBook Pricing

interesting points desert.  I guess what I really meant was as a market that is getting active customers, it is still fairly early.  either way my point was it doesn't matter if it costs 1/2 the cost of a normal book, if the number of customers is just 10% that of normal books pricing might be higher.