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Bibliophile
Jenniisme
Posts: 993
Registered: ‎01-05-2010

Re: Best way to combat Inflated E-book pricing?

I hate to say this, but WHO CARES?

 

If you find the prices too high, don't buy the book OR buy the DTB version.

 

I was paying 15.99 per book whenver I bought a hard cover from costco...now I pay between 0-12.99 which is the highest I am willing to go.

 

I still share all my ebooks with friends and don't really have an issue with the pricing.

 

Do I wish it were lower, of course...then again, there is always the library which is free.

Distinguished Correspondent
DrAstro
Posts: 134
Registered: ‎04-05-2011

Re: Best way to combat Inflated E-book pricing?

I saw this article which I found interesting: http://www.the-digital-reader.com/2011/03/30/ebook-pricing-problems/

 

Apparently there are two problems occuring with ebooks:

First, the concept of bestsellers.  Publishers like these, because they sell a lot and they make money off of them.  They get free publicity when a book lands on a top 100 list and they have an ability to basically "franchise" their bestselling author (like James Patterson or Steven King or something...). With low-priced, self-published ebooks (we're talking 99 cents), you get a lot more really cheap books on bestseller lists.  This throws off the publishers whole model.  People will buy something for a dollar, and if its crappy, there's no loss.  Its the same as the APP Store and games.  There is TONS of utter crap that sells like crazy and is popular by virtue of being cheap.  Angry Birds wouldn't sell at all if they tried charging more than a buck.  So, instead of publishers getting lots of money and free publicity from their bestsellers, now the cheap books (some good, some bad) are bestsellers and publishers get no benefits from this.

 

Second, publishers want to make the same profit on hard copies as on ebooks.  As an example, for a listed price of around $28 on a hardcover book, after the bookseller and costs of production are removed, the publisher apparently makes around $6.  A few studies have found that $6 is the sweet spot for EBOOK pricing and apparently the publisher makes around half of that amount ($3) once everyone else gets their cut.  So, from the publishers perspective, they make half the revenue on the same book when selling at the preferred ebook price.  Thats why they're pricing their books higher.  Around 12 dollars, and they maintain their $6 revenue, comparable to what they make from the print book.  From the publishers perspective, that makes sense for the most simple-minded look at things.

 

However, they're a bit shortsighted.  They're panicking and trying to stay with the old way of doing things.  There is no willingness to think differently.  They are comparing unit-to-unit.  If you cut the price of the your ebook, you sell more.  So, you might make less profit per unit, but you sell more units.  I would imagine (without any proof) that if you price your new release hardcovers at a sweet spot of $10 (well, $9.99, because we all know that $9.99 is a MUCH better deal than just saying its $10), you will 1) make consumers happy and get a good market share from repeat customers (basically what AMAZON has done) and 2) probably sell more books and keep the same profit. 

Wordsmith
mariel9898
Posts: 769
Registered: ‎01-08-2011
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Re: Best way to combat Inflated E-book pricing?

 


DrAstro wrote:

I saw this article which I found interesting: http://www.the-digital-reader.com/2011/03/30/ebook-pricing-problems/

 


Excellent thanks for posting! Tha't one of the best and clearly explains a lot of things.

 

Contributor
EricfromOregon
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎04-06-2011

Re: Best way to combat Inflated E-book pricing?

I am new to the nook color and only got my last week after getting one for my wife the week prior, the big selling point beside the web access was the ability to get books from the library that dont cost us anything.  I agree there are some books out there that are way to high price for an e-book but they must price them that way since people are willing to pay the price.  BUT ON THE OTHER HAND I suspect as E-Readers grow more and more authors will just doing self publishing, much like music artist are doing with digital music, they can cut out the middle man, put the music out there directly and keep more of the money in their pocket.  I have a friend who has written several books that are published through a well know publishing house and the amount of money compared to the price of book is awful.  Just looking at the split B&N does with a self publish book is win win.. B&N makes more profit off of each sale and the author gets more money off of each sale compared to a traditional book. 

Inspired Correspondent
FredOak3
Posts: 105
Registered: ‎03-08-2011

Re: Best way to combat Inflated E-book pricing?

But I guess that's the point, if the hardcover was $28 (with $6 profit) and they sold the E-Book for $12( With $6 profit), I wouldn't have a problem with that. I know the limitations of not owning the physical book and if I pay less than the hardcover but the publisher still makes his cut I'm OK with that.

But putting both out ther for the $28 is what is going to make me either 1) skip it 2) borrow it 3) go to the dark side.

Inspired Scribe
riffrafff
Posts: 1,581
Registered: ‎12-27-2010
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Re: Best way to combat Inflated E-book pricing?

 


DrAstro wrote:

I saw this article which I found interesting: http://www.the-digital-reader.com/2011/03/30/ebook-pricing-problems/

 

 

 

GREAT article.  Sure, some of the stuff has to be taken with a grain of salt, since, as the author admits, he is an "outsider."  Nonetheless, his comments reinforce what I've been saying all along. 

 

In the IT industry, for example, UNIX servers commonly have uptimes numbering in years, not days or weeks.  These just keep plugging along, delivering data (ebooks, possibly, in this case) day after day, month after month. Cost of operation is minimal. The content of books is already in digital format at the DTB printers (you don't think they typeset by hand anymore, do you?), ebooks are just gravy.  

 

There's some distribution costs associated with ebooks (servers, web guys/gals, etc), but anyone who thinks the cost of production of ebooks is anywhere NEAR the cost of physically producing books should ask Netflix how they can possibly make a profit streaming video non-stop for $8 per month, pay the studios, and still make a profit.  Hmmm?

 

 

 

COME...to the Dark Side.

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Inspired Correspondent
mickeyquickrice
Posts: 100
Registered: ‎02-24-2011

Re: Best way to combat Inflated E-book pricing?

I think they should drop the price by publish date.Say a book published say 5-10 years ago shouldn't be full price.I see books I read years and years ago at full price.They should do like the used book stores do..Drop the price as they get older!!Just sayin

If I had a dollar for every book I have read I would be RICH!
Contributor
threadtales
Posts: 25
Registered: ‎03-27-2011
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Re: Best way to combat Inflated E-book pricing?

I am a library girl...and I only buy books that I absolutely KNOW I will read again...To Kill a Mockingbird comes to mind...I read so much that over the last several years I decided the best place to store casual reading books (most fiction) was at the library...I am the same with my NC...read 'em and send 'em back...

 

Now cookbooks, quilting books and other reference material is a different story!:smileytongue:

Distinguished Correspondent
DrAstro
Posts: 134
Registered: ‎04-05-2011

Re: Best way to combat Inflated E-book pricing?

Maybe the best combat would be to push towards a subscription service ala Netflix.  I'm sure a lot of readers on here would happily pay around $20 a month for, say, 3 EBOOKS a month.  Not sure exactly how it would work, but if they followed some kind of Netflix model, I think they could clean up.

Inspired Contributor
BookieDT
Posts: 48
Registered: ‎10-25-2010
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Re: Best way to combat Inflated E-book pricing?

 


Jenniisme wrote:

 

I still share all my ebooks with friends and don't really have an issue with the pricing.

 


 

Other than using the one-time "Lend Me" feature, how do you share your ebooks?  I have spent a small fortune on ebooks (at least it appears that way to me) and would love to share them with family members.  I've yet to purchase a book that has the "Lend Me" feature anyway.

 

Thanks.

Inspired Contributor
Pokey1
Posts: 35
Registered: ‎04-06-2011

Re: Best way to combat Inflated E-book pricing?

I totally agree with Mickeyquickrice. I'm not going to pay full price for an older book when I know I can get it for a few $$ @ 1/2 price books & then sell it back to them after I read it. I wish there was some way to exchange my physical books for credit towards ebooks!!
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NookwormNY
Posts: 64
Registered: ‎03-30-2010
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Re: Best way to combat Inflated E-book pricing?


BookieDT wrote:

 


Jenniisme wrote:

 

I still share all my ebooks with friends and don't really have an issue with the pricing.

 


 

Other than using the one-time "Lend Me" feature, how do you share your ebooks?  I have spent a small fortune on ebooks (at least it appears that way to me) and would love to share them with family members.  I've yet to purchase a book that has the "Lend Me" feature anyway.

 

Thanks.


Very simple: Go to your BN library on-line and download a book to your desktop. Then sideload the book to your friend's Nook (on the Classic, to the "Documents" folder; on the NC, to the "My Files" -> "Books" folder)

 

When your friend opens the book on his/her Nook, it will ask for the name and CC number used when it was originally purchased. Enter the info and it will open. The Nook will retain the name and cc info (but will not charge anything to it, so any books loaded that way from your Library to their Nook will be opened.

Inspired Contributor
BrianMcE
Posts: 46
Registered: ‎03-20-2011

Re: Best way to combat Inflated E-book pricing?

I hope to see a day come where buying a hardback earns you a free digital copy. Just like so many dvd or blu-rays do. I do love the Nook Color but at times I feel like a sucker. We are paying good money for a bunch of 0's and 1's. The potential to lose all your ebooks over time is high. Just from devices failing and people changing their hobbies. It's really brilliant really. We pay for digital items when the same money could nearly buy the real thing. Very similar to the gaming notion of micro transansactions. What's awesome when you think about it is how the ebook retailers have one digital item with very low overhead that they can sell for pure profit for years and years.
Inspired Correspondent
zenaxe
Posts: 96
Registered: ‎01-09-2011
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Re: Best way to combat Inflated E-book pricing?

[ Edited ]

 


riffrafff wrote:

The only thing that would get their attention would be if everyone, everywhere (and not just on this minuscule microcosm we call the forum) suddenly quit buying ebooks. 

 

 

 


No... A lawsuit would work as well. Anything that got the media's attention or somehow went viral would too..

 

 


 

I hope to see a day come where buying a hardback earns you a free digital copy.

 


 

 

This would be a big incentive for me, personally. I generally resent buying ebooks of things I own hardcopies of. It could also be used to justify piracy in some people's minds.

Inspired Wordsmith
yocalif
Posts: 817
Registered: ‎01-03-2011
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Re: Best way to combat Inflated E-book pricing?

DrAstro  great article thanks so much

mariel9898 thank you for pointing out what makes this thread distinct from similar threads, and should be readily apparent.

 

riffrafff as always great posts.

 

phoneboy thanks for the article link.

 

OK lots of good discussion, by staying away from ranting about the pricing I learned a lot from others.

 

What is happening reminds me very much of the early PC days.  (To be brief I'm not going to list every brand/model, just major highlights.)   First Apple I & II only sold thru hobby stores, first mass marketed Personal Computer was the Commodore sold in larger retail stores (I had a C-64 Commodore).  The IBM PC hit the market with open architecture, the influence of IBM's design resulted in similarity of design in all competitors except Apple.  Early 80s PCs were very expensive however the prices did slighly lower in mid 80, HOWEVER a new pricing revolution took place.  Mail Order, Dell and Gateway among hundreds of others cut out the distributors and retail stores and sold direct to customers. (Anyone remember 900+ pages of Computer Shopper all ads for mail order sales?)  Dell started making headway in business & gov sales.  Then big box stores like Fry's came with prices that competed directly with Mail Order and the race was on to put an affordable PC in every home.

 

Ok whats my point?  Lets see who will break ranks among the big publishers and start selling online direct, cutting out Amazon & B&N, Apple, Google?  Or maybe a new publisher breaking the old rules and making new rules.  The same as Dell & Gateway did back in the 80s.

 

Actually the point is, it looks like we have to wait for ebook business models to evolve and market forces come to bear, then ebook prices will eventually hit realistic levels.

Inspired Contributor
BookieDT
Posts: 48
Registered: ‎10-25-2010
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Re: Best way to combat Inflated E-book pricing?

Thanks for sharing the info on downloading and then sideloading my Nookbooks to others.  I was under the impression that we were unable to do that.  I'll give it a try.

 

Thanks again.

Distinguished Correspondent
LGman
Posts: 117
Registered: ‎02-03-2010
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Re: Best way to combat Inflated E-book pricing?

 


DrAstro wrote:

Maybe the best combat would be to push towards a subscription service ala Netflix.  I'm sure a lot of readers on here would happily pay around $20 a month for, say, 3 EBOOKS a month.  Not sure exactly how it would work, but if they followed some kind of Netflix model, I think they could clean up.


 

The only way this would work for me if it was truly like the Netflix streaming model where I can have access to any ebook anytime as many times as I want during the month.  Anything short of that I want (need) to own the data.

I like digital data, the thought of not having quick access to it bothers me.

 

For every complex problem, there is a solution that is simple, neat, and wrong.
Wordsmith
mariel9898
Posts: 769
Registered: ‎01-08-2011
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Re: Best way to combat Inflated E-book pricing?

 


yocalif wrote:

 

Ok whats my point?  Lets see who will break ranks among the big publishers and start selling online direct, cutting out Amazon & B&N, Apple, Google?  Or maybe a new publisher breaking the old rules and making new rules.  The same as Dell & Gateway did back in the 80s.

 

Actually the point is, it looks like we have to wait for ebook business models to evolve and market forces come to bear, then ebook prices will eventually hit realistic levels.


In a way it's already happening. Check out the Android Market and see how many "book apps" there are. I've never downloaded any so I can't speak to quality or features but they are there. Then check out several authors like Amanda Hocking who are self published and selling 100,000 copies per month. I think her books are $4 or less. Mos of the books app are $4 or less.

 

Wordsmith
KingAl
Posts: 549
Registered: ‎11-16-2010
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Re: Best way to combat Inflated E-book pricing?


mariel9898 wrote:

I think that the price of an e-book when it first comes out should be equal to the price of a hardcover less the costs for paper, binding, storage, shipping, and distribution - in short all the costs that are not incurred for e-books.

 


I disagree. The price should be whatever the market will bear. If the public is willing to pay $19.99 for an ebook (see Ken Follett's "The Fall of Giants"), then the publisher should charge that much.

Wordsmith
KingAl
Posts: 549
Registered: ‎11-16-2010
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Re: Best way to combat Inflated E-book pricing?


BrianMcE wrote:
I hope to see a day come where buying a hardback earns you a free digital copy. Just like so many dvd or blu-rays do. I

That's not really free. The price of the DVD/digital combo pack is very likelyhigher than the DVD alone, though certainly cheaper than buying them separately.