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Distinguished Wordsmith
rbentley101
Posts: 222
Registered: ‎04-04-2011

Nonresident Public Library eBook Access

[ Edited ]

There have been many posts from people complaining that their local library does not have much of an offering in eBooks and also many posts asking about access to eBooks at libraries out of their area.

 

I did a little research and found that in April of this year the American Library Association surveyed and found that 2/3's of all public libraries offer eBooks and that 85% of public libraries offer wifi.  http://ala.org/ala/newspresscenter/mediapresscenter/americaslibraries2011/index.cfm

 

If your local public library does not offer eBooks or does not have a very large catalogue you often can get access to libraries out of your area.

 

1.  Ask your library if they have reciprocal agreements with other libraries.  Many do.  In my area both the Salt Lake City, UT and Salt Lake County, UT libraries have multiple reciprocal agreements with other libraries which allow my to use my card at other libraries with full borrowing privledges, including eBooks.  This may very well be available to you.

 

2.  Many public libraries allow access to nonresidents.  Unfortunately there is usually a fee for that as the services are local taxpayer supported.  The Salt Lake County library for example charges $80/year or $40/six months.  From my limited search that seemed average.  Some libraries charge nonresident fees as high as $150/year.  You can find nearby libraries that offer eBooks by using the Overdrive Search. http://search.overdrive.com/Default.aspx

 

3.  Libraries that offer cards online or by mail.  A problem with getting nonresident access is that the vast majority of public libraries require you to appear in person with ID in order to apply and pay the fees. My library claimed that was due to the Patriot Act, but I doubt that as I was able to find the following libraries however that do allow you to apply online or by mail:

 

 

    • The Free Library of Philadelphia-- .
      • Non-residents may apply by mail (using the printable registration form for a library card. The fee is $35/year. NOTE - You do not have to register in person. The first time that you want to remove "physical" material (books, movies, etc) you must show ID. Otherwise you can download audio books, e-books, music, movies, etc as soon as you get your library card.
      • As of August 2010 the collection includes 1546 epub and 652 pdf titles.
     
  • Fairfax County VA-- See library web site for residency requirements. Non-residents can apply by mail for a library card; the current fee is $27/year. As of August 2010, the collection includes 879 epub, 269 mobi, and 1892 pdf titles. 

 

  • Charlotte-Mecklenburg County -- See library web site for residency requirements. Non-residents may apply  and pay online for a library card; fee is currently $45/year. As of August 2010, collection contains 105 ePub, 59 mobi, and 177 pdf titles.  Charlotte-Mecklenburg County, NC ($45/yr)

 

  • New Orleans -- Nonresidents can apply by mail for $50 per year. Collection is very small however.  268 epub and PDF books. 

 

There are probably others, but these were the only ones I could find in the limited time I had to search.  Hope this was of some use.

 

 



 

 

Distinguished Wordsmith
rbentley101
Posts: 222
Registered: ‎04-04-2011

Re: North American Libraries With The Largest eBook Collections

As of August 2010, the following libraries from the USA and Canada seem to have the largest ebook collections:

 

  • CLEVNET -- over 18,000
  • Greater Phoenix Digital Library -- over 18,000
  • Seattle -- over 15,000
  • NYPL -- over 15,000
  • Orange County, FL -- over 11,000
  • Salt Lake County -- over 9,000
  • Lee County, FL -- over 8,000
  • Washington, DC -- over 7,000
  • Oregon Digital Library -- almost 7,000
  • R.E.A.D.S. (Tennessee) -- over 6,000
  • Brooklyn Public, NY -- over 6,000
  • British Columbia, Canada -- over 6,000
  • Los Angeles, CA -- over 6,000
  • Calgary, Canada -- over 5,000
  • Virginia Beach, VA -- 5,000
  • Columbus, OH -- almost 5,000
  • Manitoba, Canada -- over 4,000
  • San Jose, CA -- over 4,000
  • King County, WA -- over 4,000
  • Clark County, NV -- over 4,000
  • San Francisco, CA -- over 4,000

 

I was very happy to see my local Salt Lake County Library so well represented with over 9,000 titles.



Inspired Contributor
Milltree4
Posts: 60
Registered: ‎05-05-2011
0 Kudos

Re: North American Libraries With The Largest eBook Collections

I do know that the New York City Public Library will allow New York State residents to get a library card.  At the present time, it is free.  You can fill the paper work out on line.  They will mail you a card.  You do have to present proof of residency.  I could do this by email.


Distinguished Wordsmith
rbentley101
Posts: 222
Registered: ‎04-04-2011
0 Kudos

Re: North American Libraries With The Largest eBook Collections

[ Edited ]

Milltree4 wrote:

I do know that the New York City Public Library will allow New York State residents to get a library card.  At the present time, it is free.  You can fill the paper work out on line.  They will mail you a card.  You do have to present proof of residency.  I could do this by email.


The New York Public Library site  http://www.nypl.org/help/library-card says "You must present valid identification in person at a New York Public Library location before using your card to borrow materials, download eNYPL content, search Library databases, or reserve a computer. Accepted forms of identification may be found here. Identification cannot be submitted by mail or fax."

Inspired Wordsmith
yocalif
Posts: 817
Registered: ‎01-03-2011
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Re: Nonresident Public Library eBook Access

Project Gutenberg (books published prior to 1923 in public domain) 34,000 digital titles as of 2009.

 

Project Gutenberg Australia where their copyright law places authors who died prior to 1954 into public domain, thus many more titles.

 

Plus if you know where to look 10,000 titles DRM stripped current titles.

 

Unless you have a lot of extra money, and though it is always a good thing to support your local Library, (I do with the local property taxes I pay.)  Why would I want to pay those out dated over priced library fees?

 

I didn't even mention there are numerous college library systems you can down load lots of stuff for free.  If you love history, there is thousands of journals and materials worth reading.   Years ago I found the journal of a one of the last Mountain Men, unedited, no commentary, the reading was anything but boring, and what an eye opener on how history is being rewritten, NOT for the good.  How about the U.S. Army's report on all Indian attacks west of the Mississippi, covering a 30 year period, with complete reports and both civilian and military.  You might learn a thing or two that differs greatly from what you have been taught in school or by TVs in the last 50 years.

 

My point, there is enough free digital reading out there if your willing to look to cover every one of the members of this forum for a life time.

Distinguished Wordsmith
rbentley101
Posts: 222
Registered: ‎04-04-2011
0 Kudos

Re: Nonresident Public Library eBook Access

[ Edited ]

@yocalif.

 

You just posted this in another thread:  "Sure you can read free book on NC and Nooks, and convert same to read on Kindle, but most owners crave new literature and that is the purpose of this conversation." 

 

http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/NOOK-Color-General-Discussion/Should-B-amp-N-include-this-bui...



 

Now you are advocaing public journals and pre 1923 literature.  How many inconsistent positions are you going to take within 10 minutes.  :smileyhappy:

Inspired Wordsmith
yocalif
Posts: 817
Registered: ‎01-03-2011
0 Kudos

Re: Nonresident Public Library eBook Access

Which means you either misunderstood what I was posting in the other thread or I wasn't clear enough, since it is obvious I have more than a basic idea of where to get free ebooks other than B&N.

Distinguished Wordsmith
rbentley101
Posts: 222
Registered: ‎04-04-2011
0 Kudos

Re: Nonresident Public Library eBook Access


yocalif wrote:

Which means you either misunderstood what I was posting in the other thread or I wasn't clear enough, since it is obvious I have more than a basic idea of where to get free ebooks other than B&N.


Which makes it all the more confusing that you would say "B&N Nook or NC owners are basically locked in, forcing their owners to buy books from their respective device stores."

Inspired Wordsmith
chuck4prez
Posts: 722
Registered: ‎04-29-2011
0 Kudos

Re: Nonresident Public Library eBook Access


rbentley101 wrote:

yocalif wrote:

Which means you either misunderstood what I was posting in the other thread or I wasn't clear enough, since it is obvious I have more than a basic idea of where to get free ebooks other than B&N.


Which makes it all the more confusing that you would say "B&N Nook or NC owners are basically locked in, forcing their owners to buy books from their respective device stores."


OHHH, now I see how you got to your conclusion Rbentley.  I still don't think he was baiting though.  I think he just has a broken kindle on a shelf collecting dust an hundreds of kindle books on a cloud, and just wants to get people to chime in to encourage B&N to support kindle books so he won't have to replace the kindle.  BTW, this is pure speculation, and I have absolutely no reason to come to this conclusion, it just seems kinda likely, thats all.

Inspired Contributor
Milltree4
Posts: 60
Registered: ‎05-05-2011
0 Kudos

Re: North American Libraries With The Largest eBook Collections

[ Edited ]

I have had a NYC library card for over 5 years. I live 100 miles North of the city and only go down once or twice a year.  It had to be renewed last year and I went down to the Bronx and renewed it.  The library clerk handling the transaction only renewed it for one year instead of 3.  A month ago, I received an email from the library telling me that my card had expired.  They gave me the opportunity to either email or fax my identification to them.  I do know what the web site says, but I know how my case was handled.  The Library does allow people who do not live in either the city or Westchester to renew by mail.