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TexGal70
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎05-09-2011
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Restricted Kid Access

Hi!  Just got my new Nook and my 11 year old is just as anxious as I am to use it.  I am concerned that she will also have access to more adult content (i.e. Cosmo).  Is there some type of password feature to restrict her access?

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normysmom
Posts: 635
Registered: ‎03-19-2011
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Re: Restricted Kid Access

No, not at this time.  However, you can restrict access to the WIFI by having your NC "forget" your WIFI passcode/passkey.  This will not, however, restrict your daughter's access within your "on board" library of books, magazines, etc.

 

There have a been a few discussions on this topic in the recent past and, hopefully, some of those participants wrote directly to B&N on this need. ;0)

Nothing like a fire, a cat and a good Nook!
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chuck4prez
Posts: 722
Registered: ‎04-29-2011
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Re: Restricted Kid Access

anyone with a rooted NC know if there is an app for password protecting?

Inspired Wordsmith
donc13
Posts: 1,064
Registered: ‎04-22-2010

Re: Restricted Kid Access

NOTHING will stop your child from seeing inappropriate material.   They may not see it at home, they may not see it at the babysitters, they may not see it at school and they may not see it for a while....but they WILL see it.

 

Friends have computers.   Friends have cell phones.   Friends have friends, etc.

 

No, there is no software for the NC (stock NC) that can filter websites or filter which books someone on your NC can see.

 

The best thing you can do is teach your child what is and what isn't appropriate and to MONITOR their activities.   In other words, watch what they are viewing on your NC.    If you don't trust them, make the agree to loss of privledges BEFORE you even give the privledges.

 

Parents are the BEST control.but the best parents in the world will tell you, kids are curious, kids become teens and "rebel" and kids have lots of peer pressure and kids...subcome.

 


 

---------
Don
Frequent Contributor
KibblesNbits
Posts: 42
Registered: ‎04-28-2011
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Re: Restricted Kid Access

Don- while you are correct that parents themselves are the best control I think you may be overlooking that parents are usually attempting to do other things too. Like watch other children, cook, clean, do laundry, check homework, etc... which makes literally looking over your child's shoulder quite difficult.

 

I don't let my 10yr access the internet without direct, constant supervision. While it works to keep her from inappropriate content and accidental virus downloads- it also means she *rarely* has internet access. I just don't usually have the time (or interest to be perfectly honest) to stand over her shoulder while she plays math games or nick.com.

Kibbles
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roustabout
Posts: 3,629
Registered: ‎03-31-2011
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Re: Restricted Kid Access

As of now I have not seen a "safe mode" lock for the android web browser.  A rooted device could probably run an app such as "Kid Mode Play + Learn," which basically restricts apps that a kid has access to, or "Android parental control" which also controls which apps any given user can access. 

 

However, if you decide to let your kid have access to the web browser, I'm not seeing anything in the market that lets you lock that down.  You could hire someone to do something in iptables, I suppose.  The real problem is, how do you store and sort the data?  There are billions of websites on the 'net.  There are probably gazillions you don't know about but don't really want your kid viewing. 

 

www.eroticfalconry.com might well be one. No, I'm not kidding, that's a real website.  Would it, in a million years, have occurred to me to block it?  Not until I started reading "A billion wicked thoughts" it wouldn't. 

 

My recommendation is that anyone with a computer in their house look at setting up openDNS.  If you point your router at the OpenDNS name servers instead of your ISP's name servers, you add a layer of phishing and malware protection to every computer in the house by default. 

 

You can go further and set up an account, and then you can restrict access across all computers in your house by using that account's settings. 

 

OpenDNS runs servers that have pre-categorized many domain names and can quickly look to see how any domain compares to what you're interested in permitting or restricting.  Hardware for a business that does similar stuff has a starting price tag of many thousands of dollars. 

 

I don't think people realize how expensive doing this right gets, in terms of storage, processor time and programming. 

 

OpenDNS is the closest thing I've seen to a "unified easy button" for home users. 

"no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution.
Contributor
nyquil-junkie
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎05-07-2011
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Re: Restricted Kid Access

Cosmo is adult material?

 

 

Inspired Wordsmith
chuck4prez
Posts: 722
Registered: ‎04-29-2011
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Re: Restricted Kid Access


roustabout wrote:

As of now I have not seen a "safe mode" lock for the android web browser.  A rooted device could probably run an app such as "Kid Mode Play + Learn," which basically restricts apps that a kid has access to, or "Android parental control" which also controls which apps any given user can access. 

 

However, if you decide to let your kid have access to the web browser, I'm not seeing anything in the market that lets you lock that down.  You could hire someone to do something in iptables, I suppose.  The real problem is, how do you store and sort the data?  There are billions of websites on the 'net.  There are probably gazillions you don't know about but don't really want your kid viewing. 

 

www.eroticfalconry.com might well be one. No, I'm not kidding, that's a real website.  Would it, in a million years, have occurred to me to block it?  Not until I started reading "A billion wicked thoughts" it wouldn't. 

 

My recommendation is that anyone with a computer in their house look at setting up openDNS.  If you point your router at the OpenDNS name servers instead of your ISP's name servers, you add a layer of phishing and malware protection to every computer in the house by default. 

 

You can go further and set up an account, and then you can restrict access across all computers in your house by using that account's settings. 

 

OpenDNS runs servers that have pre-categorized many domain names and can quickly look to see how any domain compares to what you're interested in permitting or restricting.  Hardware for a business that does similar stuff has a starting price tag of many thousands of dollars. 

 

I don't think people realize how expensive doing this right gets, in terms of storage, processor time and programming. 

 

OpenDNS is the closest thing I've seen to a "unified easy button" for home users. 


 

You do realize you posted an active link to a porn sight right? My NC has been violated.
Inspired Correspondent
ZOMBully
Posts: 144
Registered: ‎03-07-2011
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Re: Restricted Kid Access

Is the violation from just seeing the link, or are you kinda admitting you clicked it...:smileywink: i usually dont let my son leave the site i bring up for him, and on the ipod touch or nook hes pretty good at staying in the right apps, but i do put a lot of time checkimg, thats why i love when the site/app has music that stabds out and or loops. If i dont hear it im up pretty fast. He sticks to his psp go tho lately and the browser is horrible on that.
"I became insane, with long intervals of horrible sanity." - Poe
Inspired Wordsmith
chuck4prez
Posts: 722
Registered: ‎04-29-2011
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Re: Restricted Kid Access

Oh, i clicked it. Btw, the home page is only slightly suggestive.
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normysmom
Posts: 635
Registered: ‎03-19-2011
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Re: Restricted Kid Access


nyquil-junkie wrote:

Cosmo is adult material?

 

 


Let's say that Cosmo is usually rated PG13 with rated R material often intermixed. It also often has some X rated articles thrown in. So, I certainly wouldn't want an eleven year old reading some of those articles without an adult vetting the material first.
Nothing like a fire, a cat and a good Nook!
Inspired Scribe
geatdanemomDT
Posts: 858
Registered: ‎11-21-2010
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Re: Restricted Kid Access

You do realize you posted an active link to a porn sight right? My NC has been violated.

 

 


 They disabled the link.:smileysad:

http://quiltinharmony.blogspot.com/
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NookonErik
Posts: 230
Registered: ‎02-19-2011
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Re: Restricted Kid Access

Here we go again!

Nook Color Wallpapers
Inspired Wordsmith
donc13
Posts: 1,064
Registered: ‎04-22-2010

Re: Restricted Kid Access

[ Edited ]

KibblesNbits wrote:

Don- while you are correct that parents themselves are the best control I think you may be overlooking that parents are usually attempting to do other things too. Like watch other children, cook, clean, do laundry, check homework, etc... which makes literally looking over your child's shoulder quite difficult.

 

I don't let my 10yr access the internet without direct, constant supervision. While it works to keep her from inappropriate content and accidental virus downloads- it also means she *rarely* has internet access. I just don't usually have the time (or interest to be perfectly honest) to stand over her shoulder while she plays math games or nick.com.



I agree, it is very time consuming.   But creativity in 'watching' goes a long way.   With my kids, I let them browse the internet, but also told them, I would check their page history and search request history often...and in the beginning, I did.    I checked their computers at least once a day.     I also told them that if I ever found an inappropriate site, that they'd lose their computer for X amount of time...with each infaction increasing that amount of time.   They also knew that if I found their history deleted, it was considered to be evidence they had gone somewhere they shouldn't have.

 

I can't guarantee it worked.but I can guarantee that one day, my youngest mis-typed a URL and got to a porn site.....he IMMEDIATELY ran down the steps to tell me and he was crying because he thought he was going to lose his privledges.   He didn't lose his privledges, honesty gets rewarded and it was an honest mistake.  And I NEVER found any objectionable sites when I searched their computers.  Never found any porn pictures, or even racy pictures.

 

But I can also tell you, they both learned all the words, and what they really meant from friends, classmates, just because that's what kids do.    Think back to your late elementary school days and junior high (now middle school) days.    I'll bet you learned more "naughty" things at school than you ever did at home.    And they weren't taught in classrooms, they were whispered about in the lunchroom and on the playground, etc.

 

But if you teach your kids good behavior, allow them to ask questions and get real answers and take the "mystery" away it goes a long way towards "watching" the kids.

 

I was a cop in Denver for 26 years, 99% of all the 'bad actors' I came across came from homes where there was no real parenting.    No guidance on what was right and wrong, etc.   

 

oh well..this is way off topic now...end of sermon.

 

 

---------
Don
Inspired Correspondent
zenaxe
Posts: 96
Registered: ‎01-09-2011
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Re: Restricted Kid Access

[ Edited ]

donc13 wrote:

NOTHING will stop your child from seeing inappropriate material.   They may not see it at home, they may not see it at the babysitters, they may not see it at school and they may not see it for a while....but they WILL see it.

 


While, you make many good points, I get tired of this sort of lecture on internet forums when parenting topics come up. Everyone's situtation is slightly different. Even the most responsible and concerned parents will vary their approaches to different parenting problems.

 

So, I see nothing wrong with asking for a feature to help parents in their mission of protecting and monitoring their children. Passwords and other such access controls are valuable tools in a parents arsenal for managing a child's behavior and access to things (which can even happen unintentionally without any access control). Stuff will happen and you can't control everything but I actually think it is a sign of a responsible parent that they are trying to understand what tools are at our disposal or seeking new ones.

 

Some things you simply CANNOT unsee.

 

Inspired Correspondent
ZOMBully
Posts: 144
Registered: ‎03-07-2011
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Re: Restricted Kid Access

I had a similar conversation with a friend who thoughy tv had become over sensitive to parents, he didnt have a child but he felt those who did ruined basic cable with all the protection we who do have kids wanted. I can see it boths ways in this and that. I do spend a varied amount of time payinh attention, usualy being on the large amount of time side, but as i do i have been practicing and rehearsing conversations i know its better to hae sooner then later. I try not to go out of my way to restrict something, i like helping him choose the right choices, without restricting the bad. And as for cosmo, heck yea its adult. I hope many agree maxim is more adult themed and my wife and i have both mags and constantly have a competition on which shows women more seductivly, cosmo wins 9/10 i would say always but there are occasions they lose, few, but there are.
"I became insane, with long intervals of horrible sanity." - Poe
Inspired Wordsmith
chuck4prez
Posts: 722
Registered: ‎04-29-2011
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Re: Restricted Kid Access

[ Edited ]

zenaxe wrote:

donc13 wrote:

NOTHING will stop your child from seeing inappropriate material.   They may not see it at home, they may not see it at the babysitters, they may not see it at school and they may not see it for a while....but they WILL see it.

 


While, you make many good points, I get tired of this sort of lecture on internet forums when parenting topics come up. Everyone's situtation is slightly different. Even the most responsible and concerned parents will vary their approaches to different parenting problems.

 

So, I see nothing wrong with asking for a feature to help parents in their mission of protecting and monitoring their children. Passwords and other such access controls are valuable tools in a parents arsenal for managing a child's behavior and access to things (which can even happen unintentionally without any access control). Stuff will happen and you can't control everything but I actually think it is a sign of a responsible parent that they are trying to understand what tools are at our disposal or seeking new ones.

 

Some things you simply CANNOT unsee.

 


 

 

it did not seem to me that don's post came across as a lecture. There was no "parents should do this but not that" in there.  The message i took from it is that you only have so much control of surroundings, so control what you can/want to, but don't stress too much over what gets through. Seemed to me that he was saying to each parent their own. And yes, there are most defenately things that can not be unseen.  I am still scarred from that link above, the question is why I continued on past the home page.

Inspired Wordsmith
chuck4prez
Posts: 722
Registered: ‎04-29-2011
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Re: Restricted Kid Access


geatdanemomDT wrote:

You do realize you posted an active link to a porn sight right? My NC has been violated.

 

 


 They disabled the link.:smileysad:


Both in the quote and in the original post?  Im at work, so it would be bad for me to check...

Inspired Wordsmith
donc13
Posts: 1,064
Registered: ‎04-22-2010

Re: Restricted Kid Access


zenaxe wrote:

donc13 wrote:

NOTHING will stop your child from seeing inappropriate material.   They may not see it at home, they may not see it at the babysitters, they may not see it at school and they may not see it for a while....but they WILL see it.

 


While, you make many good points, I get tired of this sort of lecture on internet forums when parenting topics come up. Everyone's situtation is slightly different. Even the most responsible and concerned parents will vary their approaches to different parenting problems.

 

So, I see nothing wrong with asking for a feature to help parents in their mission of protecting and monitoring their children. Passwords and other such access controls are valuable tools in a parents arsenal for managing a child's behavior and access to things (which can even happen unintentionally without any access control). Stuff will happen and you can't control everything but I actually think it is a sign of a responsible parent that they are trying to understand what tools are at our disposal or seeking new ones.

 

Some things you simply CANNOT unsee.

 


I'm sorry, I disagree.   NONE of the "tools" are foolproof.    New URL's come into existance every minute of every day.   NO program can instantly know of these new URLs and block your access to them.   NONE.

 

Also, hiding something (and NO, I am NOT advocating showing kids inappropriate sites) only makes it more desirable to imature minds.   You don't have to demonstrate what naked people look like to teach kids why it's not appropriate.    You don't have to wash your kid's mouth out with soap if they say a 'bad' word.   But you do need to listen and watch and when something occurs, explain why it's "bad" or inappropriate.

 

PROACTIVE parenting is the key.   Permissive attitudes or .... push little Sally or Johnny off into the corner and give them 'protected' devices so you can can sit and read your Cosmos or Playboy or Playgirl, etc. is NOT "parenting" in my mind.

 

So ... I guess we'll agree to disagree.

 


 

---------
Don
Distinguished Bibliophile
roustabout
Posts: 3,629
Registered: ‎03-31-2011
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Re: Restricted Kid Access

[ Edited ]

I had not realized that Lithium was adding in markup to make anything in www . yadda . com syntax a hot link, no.  Here and I thought normally one added the http:// up front to indicate that. 

 

However, the particular bizarre site is actually very tame, more a great example of internet rule 34 than much of anything else. 

 

That all distracts from the point, which is that filtering on-device is probably prohibitive in terms of database size and query response time.   OpenDNS is a great service which offers as its baseline setting increased protection against having your PC hijacked and can have additional filtering added if you like. 

 

www.opendns.com - there, if Lithium's making these hot by default, that'll point y'all there. 

 

As far as the tone of some of the comments, I see some as pretty judgemental.  There are some that seem to make an assumption that anyone doing net filtering is doing "fire and forget" parenting. 

 

At a business, you basically need this stuff in place to address hostile workplace issues.  Everyone knows it's not perfect.  Good managers work with their folks to keep them moving and motivated, poor managers let their teams drift until a deadline comes up and start hyperventilating about it. 

 

Both good and sloppy managers want the filtering in place at the sites I've been at -- the bad managers want it "so my people won't waste so much time," the good ones want it to reinforce professionalism. 

 

I think that engaged parents might well want filters available, in addition to communicating with their kids, etc.  I find the tone of this very similar to the tone in the ps3 forum where parents occasionally ask Sony to let them put scheduling into the parental controls option on the ps3. 

 

People tend to beat up on those parents and tell them that discipline, removing the controllers, etc. is the way to go. 

 

If what a parent wants is to not disconnect components but to tell the kids "OK, 2 hours of PS3 a day, max" - and that is coming from a single parent with a job, well, why beat the parent up or tell them how to do their job?  (As a friend points out:  on the ps3 forums, probably many users are kids who DON'T want Sony making that stuff available.) 

"no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution.