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Distinguished Bibliophile
deemure
Posts: 3,933
Registered: ‎12-28-2009
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Re: iPad Far Behind Amazon, Barnes & Noble in E-Book Sales

Mark, I agree that some products like perhaps the xoom were not thought out or finished as well, perhaps. I think with technology we have reached a point where obsolescence doesn't need to be planned. And there's a wide gap between such planned obsolescence and intentional crippling of a device to drive sales for the next model. Who would buy a car that runs only on gas and has a 2 gallon gas tank, only turns right, has a speedometer that goes up to 20, even though it goes faster, that seats one, gets 5mpgs and costs $60,000? Oh, yeah, but it has special non-glare window glass. Planned obsolescence isn't making something that's incomplete, it's making something that will breakdown and that within a reasonable amount of time will be surpassed by another model. In my opinion.
"I still believe in spite of everything that people are good at heart." Anne Frank.
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MikeFromMesa
Posts: 19
Registered: ‎05-11-2011
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Re: iPad Far Behind Amazon, Barnes & Noble in E-Book Sales

>>  Plus, I don't like the attitude that it betrays

I agree.  If I ever did buy another iPad (I returned the first one I bought after using it for a month), I'd definitely want to be able to run the Nook and Kindle apps on it.  If Apple succeeds in pushing everyone else out of their ecosystem, that's much less reason for me to ever buy into it.

 

I certainly agree with this and, as I have said in this Forum, if Apple somehow manages to stop my ability to read my books on various devices I will get rid of my iPad and replace it with some other reader. In the meantime this kind of thing (upgrades limiting my ability to do what I have a right to do) is why I do not automatically upgrade my software. My iPad is still running the original OS level and my PC is still running an older version iTunes. That, at least, may delay when I am forced to take some action like replacing my iPad.

 

Mark_OB1
Posts: 1,580
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Registered: ‎12-14-2010
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Re: iPad Far Behind Amazon, Barnes & Noble in E-Book Sales


chuck4prez wrote:

 

Another US supreme court ruling: It is a great use of federal funds and resources to task the FBI with the anti-piracy movement. 

 

Didn't you hear?  The FBI is getting new jackets, with "Agents of the MPAA/RIAA" on them.  :smileywink:  It's unfortunate that other businesses won't have the benefit of tax-payer financed police enforcement to protect their business models.

 

Because illegal copywrite infringement is such a huge risk to the security of this nation....

 

I'm sure you meant copyright.  :smileywink:  And while I agree with the sarcasm behind the comment for the amount of indigenous infringment that's going on, in a larger sense, violating copyrights could have a very large negative impact on the economic security of our nation. 

 

Just to take one example at random, China "obtains" billions of dollars each year of movies from the US without paying for it.  And billions more in music and computer software.  While we actually pay for what we get from them. 

 

As far as theatrical releases go, the gov't allows only 20 'foreign' movies each year from anywhere in the world outside China to be aired anywhere on the mainland.  DVDs of any movie can be purchased on the street for $1 there, within days of its theatrical release here.

 

The problem is similar in Russia and other countries, but our people would rather focus on the internal crumbs than deal with the major problems elsewhere.  But I digress.  We're getting a bit OT here.  :smileyhappy:

 

- Mark

 


 

Distinguished Bibliophile
deemure
Posts: 3,933
Registered: ‎12-28-2009
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Re: iPad Far Behind Amazon, Barnes & Noble in E-Book Sales

The problem isn't with individuals that may infringe on copyrights and pirate a couple books for their use or even a bunch, though that isn't legal.  The problem is as with any criminal enterprise (those who provide the content, websites that do, or individuals that maybe steal the digital content in pre-publication), 3 things are generally true:

  1. The obvious criminal act helps to further or is merely the tip of the iceberg for some larger criminal enterprise.
  2. The small fish pays a far higher price and is targeted many times way more often than the big fish.
  3. Statistics used to cite success or to indicate the largescale of such criminal behavior overwhelmingly have the prosecution of smaller fish as proof and justification for continued targeting and funding.

 

If you look at any program that is meant to target the big offenders-the war on drugs, the war on terror, you will see that it's the minor offenders that are most often "caught" and are used to show success of such wars.  When the RIAA decided to go after offenders, the people that most often got the brunt of their wrath were individuals sitting at home behind their computers.  Napster did declare bankruptcy, but its founders presumably made a killing and went on to succeed in other ventures.  There's some dispute as to the full amount in millions of dollars they actually ended up making and Napster is still out there, though requires pay for content. 

 

As with any site you visit online, you really have no idea who is behind it.  It would be hoped that the FBI would be looking into who is really behind the pirating if they are going to focus on it.  But as for us consumers it's just like if you buy a piece of "hot" jewelry from a street vendor.  He could well be selling it to help feed a drug habit or to further the ventures of some larger organization.

"I still believe in spite of everything that people are good at heart." Anne Frank.