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Inspired Contributor
nookc
Posts: 46
Registered: ‎01-05-2011

Re: NookColor NOT parent friendly...

"The OP's concern includes public wifi hotspots where no password is required.  What they are after is the ability to password-protect wifi access itself, not just specific connections."

 

What, so that their 5 and 9 year old don't surf porn while sipping a Latte at Starbucks?

 

I think password control or parental control in general isn't a bad idea and would be a good upgrade. Until then monitor usage and web history or don't let them use the Nook color unless they are observable. 

 

 

_____________________________________________

Keep the rubber side down!
Distinguished Correspondent
TNTLamb
Posts: 291
Registered: ‎03-26-2011
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Re: NookColor NOT parent friendly...

 


nookc wrote:

"The OP's concern includes public wifi hotspots where no password is required.  What they are after is the ability to password-protect wifi access itself, not just specific connections."

 

What, so that their 5 and 9 year old don't surf porn while sipping a Latte at Starbucks?

 

I think password control or parental control in general isn't a bad idea and would be a good upgrade. Until then monitor usage and web history or don't let them use the Nook color unless they are observable. 

 

 


Thats not bad advice even with pass words and parental control IF there is internet acess. Same with any internet accesable device. Its certainly advice law enforcement is giving parents...........

 

There are 293 ways to make changes for a dollar.... No wonder we see things differently
Frequent Contributor
KD67
Posts: 182
Registered: ‎10-12-2010

Re: NookColor NOT parent friendly...


HomeschoolPa wrote:

KD67:  "....homeschooling limits the social aspect of growing up......?"...LOLOLOL...spoken like a parent oblivious to the "social aspects" of public school.  Hey…maybe we just love our kids enough to care about what they are absorbing.  It’s not for everyone.

 

Look, some people don't mind their kids hanging out with foul mouthed punks and over sexed pre-pubescent girls.  Some parents are OK with the public school system indoctrinating their kids with ideas of a socialist utopia where everyone is equal and all must be fair.  And there are those that are happy as clams their kids are learning ALL about how it's the government's job to take care of their every need.  Who needs that pesky Bill of Rights, you know? To each their own....we just happen to believe in raising well-read, intelligent, independently minded young adults who know how to make it on their own.

 

My HIGHLY RESPECTFUL 5 and 9 year old both speak 2 languages (working on a 3rd) and have a great time with their swim club and UN-schooled friends.  We take 2 "field trips" a year out of the country and my daughter just can't WAIT to move out when she's 18 to travel and then start her own business. She has also read at least 45 classics and is working on her own kid's book. Oh, and did I mention she can probably school your teenage kid on early American history and most of our founding documents.

 

Let's see how quick your kid moves back in when those 9 hours at the community college is just too tough for them.  Enjoy....

 

Oh yeah...we were talking about parental controls on the NC.

 

B&N....add a damn password prompt when turning on the WiFi...problem solved. It's not that complicated.

 


 

Well thank you so much for attacking me simply for stating a personal opinion.  I have known many individuals who where home schooled, learned several languages and still simply could not cope correctly with there piers. 

 

"we just happen to believe in raising well-read, intelligent, independently minded young adults who know how to make it on their own."

Sounds like my son to the letter!  And for your information, my child is not a robot minded, follow the socialist dogma teenager that you are describing.  I was not attacking you or your method and I resent the fact that you felt it necessary to attack mine.  I simply stated that I as a parent did not personally agree with it.  And for your information, my son is a straight A honor student, a conservative mind individual that wouldn't take a handout form our socialist government if it was forced on him because he has been taught the work ethic, how to stand on his own two feet and make up his own mind by looking at the facts of the situation, and has been taking college courses while in high school for the last 2 years and is only 2 years short of having a degree in 3D animation and Game design. 

 

I never stated that you children were disrespectful.  But I think if you children read your response to me they may not think that their parent was being very respectful.  Nice way to set an example.

 

"Oh yeah...we were talking about parental controls on the NC."

 

On this note what I did say was that as a parent you should be the one to decide and/or block content from you children, not expect B&N or the Government to censor it for you. 

 

Before you open you mouth and go off on someone you may wish to know the facts first.

Distinguished Wordsmith
Josienjoe
Posts: 1,949
Registered: ‎02-15-2010

Re: NookColor NOT parent friendly...

@ KD67,

 

I must respectfully disagree that the OP's post was an attack on you.  To me, it appeared to be an attack on every parent who utilizes any kind of educational institution other than homeschooling.

 

 

Contributor
adunofaiur
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎04-25-2011
0 Kudos

Re: NookColor NOT parent friendly...

I agree with the OP on the subject of a Wi-Fi password. Personally I would just trust the kids to not do anything that their parent would find offensive (and to be honest they probably wouldn't even know what Gay and Lesbain means), but for grounding a kid or restricting access when the family might be streaming a movie on Netflix sounds like a good idea.

Distinguished Bibliophile
roustabout
Posts: 3,667
Registered: ‎03-31-2011

Re: NookColor NOT parent friendly...

People, the OP is a troll.

 

The OP claims to be raising respectful kids in some kind of a values-oriented environment, then turns around and swears at the group because BN hasn't flipped on a password lock for a reader's wireless? 

 

This does not sound to me like a parent who is raising respectful kids.  You need to be able to model the behavior you want to encourage. 

"no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution.
Nallia
Posts: 4,758
Topics: 125
Kudos: 3,238
Solutions: 4
Registered: ‎02-15-2010

Re: NookColor NOT parent friendly...

 


HomeschoolPa wrote:

KD67:  "....homeschooling limits the social aspect of growing up......?"...LOLOLOL...spoken like a parent oblivious to the "social aspects" of public school.  Hey…maybe we just love our kids enough to care about what they are absorbing.  It’s not for everyone.

 

Look, some people don't mind their kids hanging out with foul mouthed punks and over sexed pre-pubescent girls.  Some parents are OK with the public school system indoctrinating their kids with ideas of a socialist utopia where everyone is equal and all must be fair.  And there are those that are happy as clams their kids are learning ALL about how it's the government's job to take care of their every need.  Who needs that pesky Bill of Rights, you know? To each their own....we just happen to believe in raising well-read, intelligent, independently minded young adults who know how to make it on their own.

 

My HIGHLY RESPECTFUL 5 and 9 year old both speak 2 languages (working on a 3rd) and have a great time with their swim club and UN-schooled friends.  We take 2 "field trips" a year out of the country and my daughter just can't WAIT to move out when she's 18 to travel and then start her own business. She has also read at least 45 classics and is working on her own kid's book. Oh, and did I mention she can probably school your teenage kid on early American history and most of our founding documents.

 

Let's see how quick your kid moves back in when those 9 hours at the community college is just too tough for them.  Enjoy....

 

Oh yeah...we were talking about parental controls on the NC.

 

B&N....add a damn password prompt when turning on the WiFi...problem solved. It's not that complicated.

 


You know, NO ONE on here insinuated that you didn't love your children or attacked your choice in any way.  There was no reason for you to be so nasty.

 

Nallia
Posts: 4,758
Topics: 125
Kudos: 3,238
Solutions: 4
Registered: ‎02-15-2010

Re: NookColor NOT parent friendly...

 


Josienjoe wrote:

@ KD67,

 

I must respectfully disagree that the OP's post was an attack on you.  To me, it appeared to be an attack on every parent who utilizes any kind of educational institution other than homeschooling.

 

 


Truly.  I hope her respectful children don't follow her example.

 

Frequent Contributor
KD67
Posts: 182
Registered: ‎10-12-2010

Re: NookColor NOT parent friendly...


Josienjoe wrote:

@ KD67,

 

I must respectfully disagree that the OP's post was an attack on you.  To me, it appeared to be an attack on every parent who utilizes any kind of educational institution other than homeschooling.

 

 


I completely agree that it was an attack on all parents who do not subcribe to the OP's form of educating their children, I only posted what I said due to the fact that the OP singled out my post to rant and rave about.  Thank you for your response.

Wordsmith
mariel9898
Posts: 769
Registered: ‎01-08-2011

Re: NookColor NOT parent friendly...

The irony of the OPs posts is truly amazing. Almost as bad as the arrogance and self entitlement. I'd laugh if it wasn't for the fact that there are children being raised by this person.

Contributor
flbutterfly1
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎04-15-2011
0 Kudos

Re: NookColor NOT parent friendly...

I currently homeschool my 10yr old. This is my fourth HS child, I have never had a problem controlling what and when my children view on the internet or TV. I also realize that they can't be babies forever. When they were younger I did not allow them to have the internet password. My 10yr old uses the NC all the time I just turn off wifi or sometimes just turn off the router. I also have a setting in my router that only allows access to wifi during certain hours. I do not think that there should be a problem unless the parent is unable to fully supervise what is happening with their child's access to things they deem unacceptable. My children have asked about gay/lesbian things and I explained them in a vague manner that wouldn't allow for any other questions. If the parent is against explaining things in a manner that matches the ages of the children then the password for the internet in the house should be kept confidential. At some point the outside world will pop up and smack you in the face and then you be forced to answer things when you don't expect to, sometimes it is best to follow your instincts and come up with a solution on your own that your family can live with.

Contributor
flbutterfly1
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎04-15-2011

Re: NookColor NOT parent friendly...

I almost forgot 3 of my children now go to public school. I have 2 freshmen, 1 in sixth grade. I think that the choice to HS should be a choice but so should public school. As the OP thinks that homeschool apparently makes them so important that they lost the "people have the right to choose" idea then shame on them.

Distinguished Bibliophile
deemure
Posts: 3,933
Registered: ‎12-28-2009

Re: NookColor NOT parent friendly...

I guess the OP has shown an unwillingness or perhaps inability to use "teachable moments" since the swearing started.  Do you use that mouth at home?  Or is it just reserved for people that you think are special?

 

And, you know whether a child is homeschooled or public school schooled is a matter of choice.  But to make a blanket statement that every public school kid is some type of worthless trash again shows me that your parent filter is rather porous.

 

You want independent-minded kids?  Then perhaps it is best that you teach them that there are others out there that are different and don't live in the bubble you have created.  I am not making a broad claim about all home-schoolers, but am speaking to this one person's ideas specifically.

 

At the church I grew up in was the most decent, kindest lady that taught youth group classes.  She'd pick me up for church when my mom was too sick to take me, after my dad had died.  She also initiated a program that taught us about other religions and took us to Synagogues as well as other Christian churches.  There were no mosques nearby in those days, but I've no doubt she would have taken us there as well if there had been.  The idea was for us to learn that others see things differently and that knowledge is power.

 

Some of those kids that you are so quick to disparage are not as fortunate as others.  Some don't have caring parents or parents that have any kind of money at all.  But they will live in the same world as your children when they are all grown up and some how, some way your children will have to live with them.

 

Teachable moments come about when you least expect them.  If you teach and show your kids the kinds of values (not some that you've shown here) that will make them decent people, they hopefully will grow up to be so.  But, hiding them away and only not ever allowing them to mingle with kids you see as trash, won't guarantee it.  It's possible that by seeing others outside their sphere they may learn compassion, gratitude, humility, tolerance, empathy, and even a sense of a broader community.  You'll probably say that's socialism.  When actually this country was partly founded on the ideals of a sense of community.  The sense of Americans as opposed to just colonists.

 

If you only ever teach your kids the things you think are true, you really will end up with mindless robots instead of kids with independent minds.

 

I have a niece and 2 nephews that went to public schools.  There were all kinds of different kids there.  Some spoiled, some from broken homes, some from less well-healed circumstances, and some from very over-protective homes.  My niece and nephews never learned that they were better than these other kids, but they learned they were different and in some cases more fortunate.  They learned not to allow bullies to rule, they learned to stick up for one another, they learned to think for themselves and they learned compassion and how to get along with people that are different.

 

Good luck.

"I still believe in spite of everything that people are good at heart." Anne Frank.
Inspired Correspondent
Nom-de-Nook
Posts: 956
Registered: ‎08-06-2010

Re: NookColor NOT parent friendly...

Parental controls are not likely to be native on the NC.  They never implemented them on the Nook 3G or Nook WiFi either although people asked for it.  Frankly I think it is a mistake since one of their major marketing pushes for NC is the whole NookKids thing.   But if parents don't feel they can let their children use the device independently (and frankly that is the whole point of the "read to me" functionality in the kids books) then BN will end up failing at that initiative which could be really profitable (I have a 10 year old who would probably give up her iPod for a NC).  And since NookKids is only available on NC and iPad (not even Android which is what NC is developed on) I guess people wanting the NookKids could always go iPad (at twice the cost).

Inspired Wordsmith
sandie52
Posts: 666
Registered: ‎01-14-2011

Re: NookColor NOT parent friendly...

While I see why a parent would want all that passwording etc, I don't have kids and don't want a lot of extra filtering on my NC.

 

if you want more control, buy a Netbook and put the NC app on it. Then you have complete control over the web browsing

. However I don't know if a way - other than to not save the passkey to control wifi access on those either.

 

There is no one size fits all device. What may seem like a simple thing to add a few extra passwords and filtering on the browser and shop and library, all that would do is make it less enjoyable for users who don't have those concerns.

Distinguished Wordsmith
NookonErik
Posts: 230
Registered: ‎02-19-2011

Re: NookColor NOT parent friendly...

Wow . . . Another thread on this topic. - And so verbose this time!

 

It boils down to a battle between:

Those who want options and tools for parental control, turned off by default. Thus giving everyone a choice.

 

vs.

 

Those who think that Parental Controls are a form of censorship and thus bad for every citizen living in a democracy - or something like this, more or less, and therefore want NO TOOLS for anyone to decide for themselves what is appropriate.

 

It's really funny to me how those who want no parental controls espouse freedom, yet the lack of choice makes us less free.

 

 

Nook Color Wallpapers
Distinguished Bibliophile
roustabout
Posts: 3,667
Registered: ‎03-31-2011

Re: NookColor NOT parent friendly...

@Erik:  Please read my post on how to attain control over internet browsing regardless of device used. 

 

Bolting controls onto preexisting protocols that weren't developed to support content level filtering is not terribly easy. Bolting them onto one device at a time, multiply the fun by n. 

 

Bolting an on/off setting for wifi with a password lock on the Nook Color might or might not be terribly easy -- assuming that it would be easy is making an "any fool can see" argument.  (Any fool can see that the earth is flat.) Adding that password setting, even if left "off" might (further) hose the the NC 1.2 network stack.  That network stack is driving a lot of folks to buy new access points right now, because it has major problems with Westell dsl modem/wifi access points in particular. 

 

Android is open source and the code is available.  If someone wants this control panel, they could hire a contractor to implement and test it.  If it was well done, they could sell the control to other parents if they liked. 

 

Demanding that BN add (more) to Google's Android is to misunderstand the degree to which device makers are permitted to tweak Android - the changes have to be vetted through Google. 

 

As far as the book filters themselves go, most booksellers are historically not interested, as a whole, in encouraging censorship or limits.  There are cultural and legal reasons for this. 

 

The better route would be to find a bookstore whose catalog you like and encourage them to make it available electronically, via an Android app for generic tablets.  (rather than a dedicated hardware device.)  Don't register your NC with Barnes and Noble so you can avoid their offending catalog. 

"no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution.
Inspired Correspondent
Nom-de-Nook
Posts: 956
Registered: ‎08-06-2010
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Re: NookColor NOT parent friendly...

 


sandie52 wrote:
If you want more control, buy a Netbook and put the NC app on it. Then you have complete control over the web browsing

.


What NC app are you referring to?  As far as I know, there is only the Nook PC app for windows based machines.  It does not support NookKids material and is not nearly a substitute for the NC

 

Distinguished Wordsmith
NookonErik
Posts: 230
Registered: ‎02-19-2011
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Re: NookColor NOT parent friendly...

[ Edited ]

 


roustabout wrote:

@Erik:  Please read my post on how to attain control over internet browsing regardless of device used. 

 

Bolting controls onto preexisting protocols that weren't developed to support content level filtering is not terribly easy. Bolting them onto one device at a time, multiply the fun by n. 

 

Bolting an on/off setting for wifi with a password lock on the Nook Color might or might not be terribly easy -- assuming that it would be easy is making an "any fool can see" argument.  (Any fool can see that the earth is flat.) Adding that password setting, even if left "off" might (further) hose the the NC 1.2 network stack.  That network stack is driving a lot of folks to buy new access points right now, because it has major problems with Westell dsl modem/wifi access points in particular. 

 

Android is open source and the code is available.  If someone wants this control panel, they could hire a contractor to implement and test it.  If it was well done, they could sell the control to other parents if they liked. 

 

Demanding that BN add (more) to Google's Android is to misunderstand the degree to which device makers are permitted to tweak Android - the changes have to be vetted through Google. 

 

As far as the book filters themselves go, most booksellers are historically not interested, as a whole, in encouraging censorship or limits.  There are cultural and legal reasons for this. 

 

The better route would be to find a bookstore whose catalog you like and encourage them to make it available electronically, via an Android app for generic tablets.  (rather than a dedicated hardware device.)  Don't register your NC with Barnes and Noble so you can avoid their offending catalog. 


 

Well said, but why do you assume that would be the only way to go about it?

 

If you do it on the B&N server, in each user account / NC association, then you have what would likely be minor changes to the NC's Android build. I could simply sign into my B&N account and set my filters there. This way my NC is fed the content that I want. Website have been doing this kind of thing for years now.

 

You wrote, "Don't register your NC with Barnes and Noble so you can avoid their offending catalog." - That's a pretty funny statement.

 

As for your post on "how to attain control . . . yadda-yadda-yadda" - I find that solution very technical and alienates most of B&N's customers - since most folks would have no idea how to impliment that.

 

I probably could work out your solution, but it's not going to allow me to put "bedtime stories" into the B&N Shop search and only get kids books. It will prevent the B&N shop from loading - period.

 

In my opinion, I think the folks that develop web-based services need to incorporate as many tools and conveniences into their websites as possible. The only limitations should be esthetic and performance related, not political or social.

Nook Color Wallpapers
Distinguished Correspondent
DaveAvl
Posts: 93
Registered: ‎04-20-2011
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Re: NookColor NOT parent friendly...

 


NookonErik wrote:

 The only limitations should be esthetic and performance related, not political or social.


 

There may be economic considerations as well - as a business, where does B&N invest its limited resources?  How can it be persuaded to grow/evolve the NC software and web-based structure to accommodate the kinds of features being discussed here?  Is browbeating the best approach?  That's what the OP's message to B&N looked like, to me at least.

 

And as a practical matter, I expect there's been a "feature freeze" on the NC software until the host of issues surrounding the 1.2 update are resolved.  As a former programmer and software designer, I can assure you that the last thing you want to do when troubleshooting is try to add a bunch of new features at the same time...

 

- Dave, in Asheville