Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Distinguished Bibliophile
deemure
Posts: 3,933
Registered: ‎12-28-2009

How the Nook has Changed Things

Well, these may be reasons why J.K. Rowling doesn't like ebooks.

 

It used to be when I'd curl up with a good book, that book was like an old friend.  I was curling up with that book, but no more.  Now, when I go to read, I am curling up with my nook.  I don't say anymore that "I'm gonna go read" this or that book, I say, "I'm gonna go read my nook". 

 

Now this may seem like a minor point, but it is in reality a quantum leap.  Of course, I am setting about to read a particular book when I pick up my nook, but the focal point has changed.

 

In public, it used to be if I was reading a book, that was kind of like advertisement for the book.  Anyone who looked could see what I was doing and what I was reading (unless for some reason I was hiding the book I was reading with a cover).  Now, someone might ask, "what are you doing?"  And my reply is not that I am reading this or that book, but that I am reading my nook or less often that I am reading such and such book on my nook.

 

The point is the nook has changed my relationship with books, but more to the point involving authors, it has also done away with that free advertising.  I don't get asked if I like the book I am reading anymore, but perhaps, "what's a nook" or even how I like my nook.  For me, the nook has become the good friend and the book seems to just reside upon it. 

 

I don't know if that is good or bad, I love my nook, but think somewhere a book is crying.

"I still believe in spite of everything that people are good at heart." Anne Frank.
Contributor
JRenshaw
Posts: 21
Registered: ‎03-24-2010
0 Kudos

Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

It's an important distinction, but I don't think it's one that the literary world should fear.  I feel sorry for any author who feels that the gateway is more important than the realm it opens onto.

Inspired Bibliophile
LarryOnLI
Posts: 2,002
Registered: ‎01-04-2010
0 Kudos

Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

Very good point deemure.

 

After reading your post I reviewed in my mind every time in the last few days I was asked, or stated, what I was going and it was always "I'm going to read my nook"  or I'm reading my nook".

 

Only when asked what book are you reading on it did I respond with "I'm reading .....".

 

Of course when eReaders become more common I expect more questions regarding what I am reading, instead of what am I reading on.

 

AlanNJ
Posts: 3,722
Topics: 64
Kudos: 1,518
Registered: ‎03-09-2010
0 Kudos

Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

Hmmm... I hadn't thought about how many times I used to go on vacation and people would stop and talk to me about a book they saw me reading.  Of course, now they stop and talk about the Nook they see me reading so I guess it all evens out.

►Without order there is chaos◄
Distinguished Bibliophile
deemure
Posts: 3,933
Registered: ‎12-28-2009
0 Kudos

Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

 

JRenshaw wrote:

It's an important distinction, but I don't think it's one that the literary world should fear.  I feel sorry for any author who feels that the gateway is more important than the realm it opens onto.

 

 

That's exactly it.  J. K. Rowlings thinks that what's important is the feel and experience of opening a book, smelling it and all, but I'm not sure I buy that.  I think if one truly loves the written word then any medium that gets it out and to the greatest number of people possible is more important than the smell of a book.  But then she did release Beedle the Bard as a limited edition bound in leather and silver with semi-precious stones, and then caved and released other less ambitious editions when people expressed their unhappiness with this.  One of the limited ed. ones sold at auction for about $4 million.  A volume speaks money and money speaks volumes.  Sigh, I miss the days when writers wrote because of some inner need.

"I still believe in spite of everything that people are good at heart." Anne Frank.
AlanNJ
Posts: 3,722
Topics: 64
Kudos: 1,518
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

I've had many people tell me they only like the feel of turning a page when reading a book.  When I was growing up I listened to music by putting a needle on a record and having to turn the record over when it was halfway through to hear the whole thing.  Then I switched to tapes.  Then CD's came out.  Now I listen on my iPod.  I still hear the music.

To me the medium is NOT the experience.  I still use my imagination when reading a book on my Nook.  That's what is important.

►Without order there is chaos◄
Distinguished Correspondent
SlaughterS
Posts: 526
Registered: ‎01-28-2010
0 Kudos

Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

All the literary world should concern itself with is that ... I am actually buying more books than I ever did before.

 

(and I tend to read one book every one or two days)

This is the Internet. I'm not going to let my complete lack of actual knowledge stop me from giving my opinion....
Frequent Contributor
Shrew
Posts: 65
Registered: ‎12-13-2009
0 Kudos

Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

[ Edited ]

 

deemure wrote:

I don't know if that is good or bad, I love my nook, but think somewhere a book is crying.

 

I think the book is crying because it was a tree, and now it's dead.  It died so that we can read our books.  I feel that these ereaders are great because we will still be able to read our books when we can't make books from trees anymore.  With my nook, I now read guilt free.

~ Pam
http://smiling-raindrops.blogspot.com
Frequent Contributor
Greeny
Posts: 69
Registered: ‎12-18-2009

Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

 

SlaughterS wrote:

All the literary world should concern itself with is that ... I am actually buying more books than I ever did before.

 

(and I tend to read one book every one or two days)

 

 

I couldn't agree more; granted I don't read that fast, but I have bought more books since mid December than I have in the last 7 years.

 

I read to read. Frankl;y I hated turning pages, I hated cracking the spine so I could read the words on the inside parts of the pages, I read what I want to read and don't care if others can see what I read.

 

I think the Rowlings of the world need to enter the new century. If they need something special and want something special people will buy it. There are people like me that prefer to curl up with my ebook and get lost in the wonderful world of e-ink and don't want to deal with the paper!

Frequent Contributor
Unburnt
Posts: 71
Registered: ‎01-02-2010
0 Kudos

Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

 

Shrew wrote:

 

deemure wrote:

I don't know if that is good or bad, I love my nook, but think somewhere a book is crying.

 

I think the book is crying because it was a tree, and now it's dead.  It died so that we can read our books.  I feel that these ereaders are great because we will still be able to read our books when we can't make books from trees anymore.  With my nook, I now read guilt free.

 

Instead, you are reading on a device made from fossil fuels and mined metals, the harvesting of which is far more destructive than logging.

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
deemure
Posts: 3,933
Registered: ‎12-28-2009
0 Kudos

Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

[ Edited ]

I do think there's a give and take here, the albeit perhaps small, electricity use and the use of parts made with heavy metals, plastic and the like are considerations versus killing a tree to make paper.  No matter what we do, everything that we use, eat, breathe, drive, read, or otherwise consume, impacts the environment in some way.  As humans we just seem to do our best to be as far removed as possible from the more seamy side of what our consumption costs.

 

We are for good or bad, CO2, methane, and God knows what else, waste producers in the extreme.  I just hope planet earth doesn't decide to dump us all into some big landfill in the heavens.

"I still believe in spite of everything that people are good at heart." Anne Frank.
Frequent Contributor
Shrew
Posts: 65
Registered: ‎12-13-2009
0 Kudos

Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

 

deemure wrote:

I just hope planet earth doesn't decide to dump us all into some big landfill in the heavens.

 

 

Not a problem; my nook has WI-FI.

 

~ Pam
http://smiling-raindrops.blogspot.com
Frequent Contributor
Dyrinn45
Posts: 240
Registered: ‎03-29-2010
0 Kudos

Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

[ Edited ]

People need to understand that while not all technology is a good advancement, the e-reader and "e-book" are. In todays society where everyone is concerned with their actions impact on our enviroment, publishers should really get behind this and create a positive spin but also push e-readers as the way to get books. This would be good for companys like B&N but it would be good for publishers because without any facts to back this up, I would assume an e-book costs less to produce and sell than a regular 400 page novel. Saving trees saves money for everyone, minus the cost of printing from a books price and you may save a few dollars with every book purchase...and while I don't have an extensive collection of books, I have about 85, I would imagine that would save 1 or 2 trees and probably 150 dollars if they were all e-books.

 

And J.K. Rowling probably hates e-books because she fears digital piracy(illegal sharing of digital media). But I sit back and think as someone who is laid-off and struggles just to make sure bills get paid, that someone who made over one billion dollars off of her harry potter books should be so concerned with money. That and the fact that harry potter is for 15 year olds makes it so that I will never read or see a harry potter anything.

Frequent Contributor
SmilinGirl
Posts: 50
Registered: ‎01-21-2010
0 Kudos

Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

"Adapt or die" is the motto of successful businesses.  Book publishers can try with all of their might to hold on to their antiquated business models, or they can adapt now and experience success.  Imagine if the big record companies had refused to change from the vinyl record format?  It is the same thing with ereaders. Technology and consumers will drive the market, not the publishers.  Hardcover books will be a thing of the past.

 

READ THIS PUBLISHERS:  I vow to never ever purchase another hardback book again!!!!  Like many others have stated, I have purchased many more books in the past few months than did the entire previous year.  A smart publishing company would pick up on that trend and capitalize on this new market instead of trying to fight it. 

 

 

 

 

"Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read."
--Groucho Marx
Frequent Contributor
BigmouthStrikesAgain
Posts: 33
Registered: ‎03-23-2010

Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

I'm just happy that I will no longer have stacks of books in my apartment that topple over on me!  It seems that as soon as I've taken a few bags to the library or passed them on to someone else, I have 4 more stacks.  My Nook is helping to declutter my life.

Inspired Wordsmith
NJMetal
Posts: 219
Registered: ‎01-13-2010
0 Kudos

Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

Shrew wrote:

 

deemure wrote:

I don't know if that is good or bad, I love my nook, but think somewhere a book is crying.

 

I think the book is crying because it was a tree, and now it's dead.  It died so that we can read our books.  I feel that these ereaders are great because we will still be able to read our books when we can't make books from trees anymore.  With my nook, I now read guilt free.

 

   Until you realized that your Nook needs to be recharged over and over again and that electricity leaves a carbon footprint and that perhaps it's not nearly as green as it seemed on the surface at first.

 

   That being said, I recall reading an article on some pro environmental web site that claimed research showed the ereader has less environmental impact given long term implications.  So you can still feel fairly guilt free.  The nook is electronic so there will always be some price to pay environmentally if you really do care.

"We always condemn most in others, that which we fear most in ourselves." -Robert Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance
Frequent Contributor
Dyrinn45
Posts: 240
Registered: ‎03-29-2010
0 Kudos

Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

not only does electricity have a lower carbon foot print, some people harvest solar or wind for power.

Distinguished Bibliophile
deemure
Posts: 3,933
Registered: ‎12-28-2009

Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

I'm just happy my nook allows me to read more efficiently.  If I don't like a book I'm reading or it's a long one (Stephen King), I can easily switch books for a change of pace, rather than search through stacks of books I have or run to the bookstore. 

 

Of course, I am now becoming a chair potato.  Cobwebs have begun forming on me.  I have certainly changed my carbon footprint-it's now a butt-print.

"I still believe in spite of everything that people are good at heart." Anne Frank.
Frequent Contributor
Shrew
Posts: 65
Registered: ‎12-13-2009
0 Kudos

Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

 

NJMetal wrote:

Shrew wrote:

 

deemure wrote:

I don't know if that is good or bad, I love my nook, but think somewhere a book is crying.

 

I think the book is crying because it was a tree, and now it's dead.  It died so that we can read our books.  I feel that these ereaders are great because we will still be able to read our books when we can't make books from trees anymore.  With my nook, I now read guilt free.

 

   Until you realized that your Nook needs to be recharged over and over again and that electricity leaves a carbon footprint and that perhaps it's not nearly as green as it seemed on the surface at first.

 

   That being said, I recall reading an article on some pro environmental web site that claimed research showed the ereader has less environmental impact given long term implications.  So you can still feel fairly guilt free.  The nook is electronic so there will always be some price to pay environmentally if you really do care.

 

 

Yes, I am aware of the other elements in the environment. This particular comment was only about the trees. My comment was posted with a light intent. I apologize if it sounded otherwise.

 

~ Pam
http://smiling-raindrops.blogspot.com
Distinguished Correspondent
very-simple
Posts: 1,262
Registered: ‎11-11-2009
0 Kudos

Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

Everything is a tradeoff, but for me, in my incredibly spacious 638 square foot one bedroom manhattan apartment, with, literally, piles of books on the floor, the nook was by far the more "environmental" choice, if only for my own personal environmental comfort.