Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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Inspired Bibliophile
LarryOnLI
Posts: 1,998
Registered: ‎01-04-2010
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Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

@Dyrinn45,

 

I'm afraid SlaughterS has you on this one.

 

There have been many professional/academic studies done on digital vs. print archival of records.

 

For records that must be kept and readable for long periods of time, print wins. It is part of my job function to be aware of this issue.

 

The rule of thumb for magnetic media used to be 5 years (it has gone up since then).The rule of thumb for optical is 20 years (although if properly stored it can be much longer than that).

 

Technology improvements increase the shelf life of digital media, but technology improvements are also part of the problem. I.e.. I have an important document on an 8" floppy disk drive (if you had CDs at 12 years old you probably haven't even seen an 8"" floppy). Sure you might find one on eBay this year, but 20 years from now, how about 50.

 

If not floppy disks, then how about QIC tape, or 9 track tape, was it encoded in ASCII or EBCDIC?

 

Frequent Contributor
Dyrinn45
Posts: 240
Registered: ‎03-29-2010
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Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

yes up until 6 or 7 years ago i had a floppy drive on my pc, i also had a zip disk drive as well. if you mean the 8" hard disks of the OLD days then i saw those 2, i had games on them for my very first pc.

 

but the point i am making is digital media can be stored and copied much easier than print material, and i still have media from over a decade ago and you all say that it should die within 5 years...which i havent seen yet. I assume baring something terrible happening that B&N will still be in business in 20 years. And they probably track all the digital media you buy from them and could replace it if needed.

Inspired Bibliophile
LarryOnLI
Posts: 1,998
Registered: ‎01-04-2010
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Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

LOL.

 

Yes up until 56 or 7 years ago you had a 3.5" floppy disk drive on your PC.

 

Before that you had a 5.25" floppy drive.

 

Older systems had 8" drives. I still remember loading software and data into an original IBM PC off of cassette tape.

 

The point is that 50 or 100 years from now, your CD might be in perfect condition and there might be nothing around that can read it.

 

Now a point in your favor is that the paper used in the books that last hundreds of years is made very differently than the cheap paper used in mass produced books today. The paper used in newer books has a much shorter lifespan.

 

Wordsmith
Po1gara
Posts: 290
Registered: ‎11-20-2009
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Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

 

LarryOnLI wrote:

LOL.

 

Yes up until 56 or 7 years ago you had a 3.5" floppy disk drive on your PC.

 

Before that you had a 5.25" floppy drive.

 

Older systems had 8" drives. I still remember loading software and data into an original IBM PC off of cassette tape.

 

The point is that 50 or 100 years from now, your CD might be in perfect condition and there might be nothing around that can read it.

 

Now a point in your favor is that the paper used in the books that last hundreds of years is made very differently than the cheap paper used in mass produced books today. The paper used in newer books has a much shorter lifespan.

 

 

LOL! I remember typing programs onto punch tape (paper) to load into the computer.

 

Frequent Contributor
Dyrinn45
Posts: 240
Registered: ‎03-29-2010
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Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

im not trying to start a war of words by any means, simply stating that digital media is the future, while i hope paperback books always exsist because i love that tactile feel of books and walking into brick and mortar stores and taking in that book store smell.

Inspired Wordsmith
NJMetal
Posts: 219
Registered: ‎01-13-2010
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Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

Dyrinn45 wrote:

OK, lets see...i have books less than 10 years old that are literally falling apart, and i have cd's from when i was 12-13 years old(12 years) that still work.

 

so yes, they can fail, but i have never had a cd/dvd just stop working on me, if it did it was because of horrible surface damage on the burned side.

 

like i said, digital media gets more and more reliable every day, where as the books design hasnt changed in what...100 years? you will lose the fight in digital vs print, especially as time wears on.

 

and the way to prove this is to look at every big business...how many of them do you think keep records of anything in print copy?

 

so yes, print can last longer, but it can also not. digital is winning the war, it is the future and in my experience is far more reliable.

 War?  I don't believe there is a war between digital and print.  It's a foregone conclusion that the printed word will never be obsolete.  The issues of digital storage being one of the major reasons.  Clearly you do not understand pitfalls of electronic storage.  There is no sense arguing with you until you educate yourself further on the matter.  Some simple google searches will give you a better idea and may I recommend reading The Case for Books  (currently available only in print), which delves deeply into the topic.

"We always condemn most in others, that which we fear most in ourselves." -Robert Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance
Contributor
mpengle
Posts: 19
Registered: ‎01-30-2010
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Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

NJMetal,

 

Didn't you give The Case for Books a paltry two-star rating??

 

Sorry, sorry, just teasing you and stirring up the pot. Please do not take offense, just goofing around. :smileyvery-happy:

Inspired Wordsmith
NJMetal
Posts: 219
Registered: ‎01-13-2010
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Re: How the Nook has Changed Things

mpengle wrote:

NJMetal,

 

Didn't you give The Case for Books a paltry two-star rating??

 

Sorry, sorry, just teasing you and stirring up the pot. Please do not take offense, just goofing around. :smileyvery-happy:

 

Indeed I did.  I didn't say it was an exciting read, but the information is there in all it's bland glory.

"We always condemn most in others, that which we fear most in ourselves." -Robert Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance