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mpb2000
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎06-30-2010
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Non-resident library cards for ebooks

What are the best options for non-resident libraries to check out ebooks?  Obviously, some combination of cheap and good availability is ideal.  I have seen some talk of Philadelphia.  What do people use?

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nickels
Posts: 204
Registered: ‎11-13-2009
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Re: Non-resident library cards for ebooks

The Free Library of Philadelphia! (But I am a local so I'd use it anyway)

http://freelibrary.lib.overdrive.com/E0499958-A5A6-4BA0-8A41-323E0C40FF98/10/354/en/Default.htm

gqb
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gqb
Posts: 1,523
Registered: ‎01-30-2010
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Re: Non-resident library cards for ebooks

When you say non-resident, do you mean non-resident of a state or non-resident of a particular city?

 

Some libraries give free cards to anyone who is a resident of that state.  I have three cards from Texas libraries and I live six hours away from two of them and 1 1/2 hours away from the other.

 

Check www.overdrive.com for a list of libraries with e-books in your state and contact them to see if they're free or if you can apply by mail or have to walk in.  And, check out the Free Library of Philadelphia for $15 if you don't live there.  It doesn't hurt to have more than one card because of waiting lists and book availability.

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ThatsSoYou
Posts: 18
Registered: ‎06-27-2010
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Re: Non-resident library cards for ebooks

For those who don't live in philadelphia and got the non-resident card, did you have to travel to the library to activate it? I'm strongly considering buying a card from that library but I live in upstate NY, there's no way I could travel there to activate it. There's no local libraries that have overdrive. 

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worthmaur
Posts: 73
Registered: ‎05-07-2010
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Re: Non-resident library cards for ebooks


ThatsSoYou wrote:

For those who don't live in philadelphia and got the non-resident card, did you have to travel to the library to activate it? I'm strongly considering buying a card from that library but I live in upstate NY, there's no way I could travel there to activate it. There's no local libraries that have overdrive. 


 

No, you do not have to go there in person (I live in NC). Print off the application from their website and mail it in with a check for $15. It took about 4 weeks for mine to arrive and I've been getting books from them ever since. Best $15 I ever spent!

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ThatsSoYou
Posts: 18
Registered: ‎06-27-2010
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Re: Non-resident library cards for ebooks

Alright, thank you so much! I think I may actually end up doing that then! :smileyhappy:

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joybo
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎04-05-2010
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Re: Non-resident library cards for ebooks

I got my Philly card - but started wondering with so many people getting them - wonder how long the wait lists are for the popular books LOL!

 

I used the Overdrive site to find some other libraries - within my state - to see about getting cards. All the ones that I have found I have to actually GO to the library to get the card...so that has been a little bump in the road...but while I'm on vacation, I'm gonna pick one up in this area....I figure another $15-$50 a year for at least one more card would still be cheaper than buying books!!!

proud owner of the Nook - never thought I could live without my REAL book in my hands...pleasantly surprised!!
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Fuddster
Posts: 48
Registered: ‎06-06-2010
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Re: Non-resident library cards for ebooks

Well...

 

I used to live in Philly, but now I'm in South Jersey. But I work in Delaware County right outside of Philly. So because I work in DelCo, I can get a library card there. Then, because I'll have a PA library card, I'll be able to get a free Free Library of Philadelphia card...

 

Then again, it just might be easier to pay the $15... :smileywink:

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Lynns_Nook
Posts: 81
Registered: ‎06-21-2010
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Re: Non-resident library cards for ebooks

My small town library doesn't yet have ebooks.  

 

The closest big city is Colorado Springs and while they will give me a card for DTBs, I can't check out ebooks with it because I live in a different library district. The rule makes no sense and is not in keeping with Colorado library policy, but that's what bureaucracy does best. They suggested I use someone else's card for ebooks and so I'm using my daughter's.  However, they don't have a large selection anyway.

 

The best selection I've seen so far is at Denver Public Libraries where I can get a card for ebooks but it requires a physical visit. I'll make that trip soon.

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Doc_R
Posts: 90
Registered: ‎10-26-2009
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Re: Non-resident library cards for ebooks

[ Edited ]

Count this as another affirmation of the Philly library.  At $15/year for OOS residents, it is a bargain.  We live in Maryland and belong to the state's digital e-consortium but it is fairly weak; the vast majority of titles are books on tape and the overall selection is limited.