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tommcgtx
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Registered: ‎04-01-2013
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Nook 1st Edition Web browsing

Hi, I recently obtained a first edition Nook, which I don't actually have yet, and I understand it has web browsing capabilities. My concern is the ability to veiw adult materials on the Web. I have used the B & N customer service chat twice. One rep told me you absolutely could not, and another told me you can. One told me you can't veiw videos also, and both told me there are no parental restrictions whatsoever. Does anyone have first hand knowledge of this matter? I have read threads about router restrictions and such, and that's not what I'm looking for. I want to know concretely if adult images and the like can be accessd with the first edition nook, and if anyone knows if the browser can be disabled or limited in any way to control such access. Thank you.

Doug_Pardee
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Re: Nook 1st Edition Web browsing

The browser in the N1E is extremely slow and clunky. It's primarily intended to allow Wi-Fi access to "captive portals" such as at Starbucks, where you have to enter a password or accept terms and conditions in order to get connected to the 'Net.

 

It's way too slow to display videos, and I don't believe it has any software for viewing videos. It will, however, display images, if you're patient enough.

 

There are no parental controls of any kind, nor any way to disable the browser. Disabling the browser wouldn't be enough, anyway, because the NOOK Bookstore carries erotica, some with rather explicit covers. All you can do is to add a password which will block any usage of the device.

 

B&N's stance, from their Terms and Conditions: "Our products and services are marketed for and directed towards purchase by adults or with the consent of adults."

 

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tommcgtx
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Re: Nook 1st Edition Web browsing

Ok, thanks, that's pretty much what I thought. No third party ways of doing this? Any other suggestions?

Doug_Pardee
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Re: Nook 1st Edition Web browsing

No. There's no way around it.

 

But really, does it matter? Is anyone going to stick around for five minutes watching a low-resolution B&W picture download? After fifteen or twenty minutes of working their way through the Web with the world's slowest browser?

 

You could buy a Nook Simple Touch Reader. Its browser is locked down to only being usable for logging into captive portals. The NOOK HD and HD+ have parental controls, I believe. Except... a quick search of the Web will turn up a bunch of easy ways to "root" those devices, whereupon you can do most anything with them you could do with a tablet. For that matter, just about anything with a screen on it can be "rooted."

 

About the only reasonably solid option I can think of is to find an older e-reader that doesn't have any Wi-Fi or 3G capabilities. Maybe an old Kobo or Sony. That way there's simply no way they can connect it to the 'Net, because the hardware isn't there.