Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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Dhanu
Posts: 59
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Nook vs. Kindle

 


flyingtoastr wrote:

 


Dhanu wrote:

no, it wouldn't.  You are just changing a battery, not softrooting the ereader or some such thing.  I would think if you put in a battery not made for the Kindle then it could.

 


 

Kindle Warranty TCW, Section 9, Subsection B:

 

B. Service or replacement required as a result of any alteration of the equipment, or repairs made by anyone other than a participating servicing dealer, an authorized service provider, its agents, distributors, contractors or licensees, or the use of supplies other than those recommended by the manufacturer.

 

If you replace the battery on your K3 and something goes wrong they will not cover it. You have voided your warranty.


 

And if my battery goes prior to the end of the warrenty, as was already stated, I would just send back the Kindle under the warrenty for a replacement Kindle.  After warrenty is up you can do as you wish.  They do have instructions to change the battery and you can also purchase the battery. 

I have a Nook and a Kindle and love them both for different reasons.  I just wanted to clarify that you can change the battery if necessary.

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pencilpusher
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎09-05-2010
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Re: Nook vs. Kindle

My perception has been that amazon.com has more books than the nook and the prices are lower. However...my perception has been WRONG. I went back and checked every paper book I have purchased in the last year (nearly 100 books) as a fair sampling of the books I actually buy. Amazon had a couple that B&N did not. B&N had one that amazon did not. The prices were usually exactly, to the penny, the same.

 

I also did a search for all the books of particular authors that I buy. For example Carl Hiassen. Amazon had one or two more of his older books than B&N. Cormac McCarthy was a tie.

 

It might have just as much to do with what books you like as anything. My solution. Buy my books in EPUB from where ever I can get them. If I flat can't find an EPUB version and Kindle has it, buy it from amazon and use the Kindle PC ereader (I've done that exactly once).

 

Eric

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LadyTessie
Posts: 134
Registered: ‎04-13-2010
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Re: Nook vs. Kindle

pmd772 wrote: For example: HBO just premiered a new series "Boardwalk Empire" this week. When I went to find the original book that inspired the series, Amazon has it ready to download as a Kindle book and B&N strikes out again.

 

 

You probably know this by now but it has been made available at BN. This is assuming I pulled the right book. And, I don't know when it was added.

 

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/books/e/9780937548998/?itm=1&USRI=boardwalk+empire+the+birth+high+t...

 

 

Doug_Pardee
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Ectaco and B&N DRM


Doug_Pardee wrote:

 

There are other e-readers that can handle B&N e-books. The Pandigital Novel is probably the most significant. There's also the Ectaco Jetbook Lite—and perhaps the Mini; we'll see.

Nate the Great at The Digital Reader reports that the Ectaco Jetbook Mini doesn't support any DRMed format. So just the "Lite", then.

 

Nate says that the Mini doesn't even handle EPUB. It wants its e-books in FB2. :smileytongue:

 

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sabst79
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎01-15-2010
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Re: Nook vs. Kindle

 


NookGuy wrote:

 


Dhanu wrote:

 


love_my_karma wrote:

 



Wouldn't that void the warranty?

 


no, it wouldn't.  You are just changing a battery, not softrooting the ereader or some such thing.  I would think if you put in a battery not made for the Kindle then it could.

 


I beg to differ. The Kindle 3 battery is NOT considered user-replaceable. If you try to and hose it, I believe Amazon will say you voided the warranty. There have been posts on forums at Amazon, MobileRead, etc with emails from Amazon CS reps stating that the battery is not user replaceable. I would check with Amazon before attempting it.

 


It would void the warranty, but if hte battery needs to be replaced while the Kindle is still under warranty Amazon would do it for free or send you a new Kindle.  Once its out of warranty, you got nothing to lose by replacing it yourself. 

 

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pearl5
Posts: 29
Registered: ‎06-29-2010
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Re: Nook vs. Kindle

I think it is a good idea to contact the publishers as much as you can as they are the ones who need to change the format, not B&N. I have had good success with 2 publishers of books I wanted that are currently on Kindle. They emailed me and said they are now working to have other formats including for nook. They didn't say how long it would take but at least I know they are working on it. I think this shows they are now seeing that it is important to not stick with only one format (Kindle).

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Frequent Contributor
Beckah
Posts: 26
Registered: ‎06-09-2010

Re: Nook vs. Kindle

I don't know how many people downloaded or read The Long Tail the 5th of the free books from early summer. I only got a little ways into it but the concept of the "long tail" is that a brick-and-mortar store can't stock items they won't sell lots of and quickly -- it's not financially smart. However a webstore with electronic merchandise (he used the example of music downloading) can stock the tune that only gets purchased every few months -- but every few months becomes worthwhile when there's no limitation of physical space.

 

I'm someone that reads out into the long tail. In the 1970s and 1980s, I had to order books all the time through my local booksellers. In the 1990s, Amazon came online. First I'd check locally and if the book wasn't available, I could order it myself. Amazon has had nearly two decades to develop working relationships out into the long tail. B&N is moving in that direction -- yesterday I looked up a book that wasn't available in eForm at B&N at the beginning of the summer but is now.

 

However, and this morning is an example, part of getting an eReader is getting what you want now -- not in the future. The Ryder Cup starts next week and I know the last Ryder Cup captain, Paul Azinger, has published a book about his winning strategy. I started this morning with my library and they don't have a copy in any form. B&N has the hardback for $17 and change. So I went to Inkmesh. Guess who has the only eBook and it's only $9.99. Yes, it's from a boutique publisher and, yes, now that I've mentioned it here, it may just appear in the B&N catalog as an eBook soon.

 

But my point is that I've had this happen enough over my few months of Nook ownership that I've realized why should I, the buyer, have to jump through so many hoops to read the book I want to read when I want to read it. I can afford to own two eReaders. I know all the books I've ordered over the years from Amazon because they weren't in my excellent local public library so they weren't books that most people wanted to read. Long Tail folks are in a tiny minority, which is what creates the Long Tail. However if someone is here debating a Nook vs a Kindle and they know they read way out into the Long Tail on a frequent basis; they may, like me, find themselves frustrated when they can only find the ebook at Amazon. 

 

I'm not sure B&N wants to (or should) pursue much of a long tail strategy. The majority of readers are in the mainstream like the previous poster who said everything he'd read was available including Hiaasen. Which had me scratching my head since I assume Hiaasen is represented by a major publisher and would be available pretty much everywhere at the same price. I almost looked it up but then said that's the real problem with the Nook -- it's just way too much trouble to always be hunting around on the web. I realized that at heart I'm the type of reader that Amazon is marketing to -- I just want to turn on my eReader, look for the book and download it. Sure with the Nook I can shop at Sony, etc. But I've yet to look for an eBook and not find it at Amazon if it's available anywhere, and the price is always competitive. I want to be a reader not a shopper. Also the more the technology gets in the way of reading, the less I like eReading. 

 

Anyway, this frustrated Nook owner is off to Amazon to download a sample chapter of Cracking the Code and to decide whether to keep waiting for the holiday price wars or visit Best Buy to see if the K3 is stocked yet.

 

 

Inspired Correspondent
bobwa
Posts: 85
Registered: ‎12-28-2009

Re: Nook vs. Kindle

Thank you for an excellent, thoughtful post.  I have been thinking much the same way.  When I first got my nook I got a kick out of searching through various sources for a book I wanted at a reasonable price.  And, I established a very beneficial relationship with our library.  Over time, I've tired of the hunt.  And, I have come to resent B&N pricing that is so erratic that every transaction has to be evaluated.  Why should it ever be true that an ebook costs more than an available DTB?  I continue to use the library frequently, and for that reason alone I prefer the nook to the Kindle.  But, I am perplexed at the B&N approach.  They have an excellent ereader with features that distinguish it.  But, as the market matures, most customers will just be about reading books -- the books they want, when they want them, at a price that doesn't seem exploitive.  B&N makes many pronouncements about being all in with ebooks.  I don't find their behavior to match their public pronouncements.  If Amazon decides to open its platform to ePUB the game will be over.  If I were B&N I'd like my future to be in my hands, not in those of a competitor.

Frequent Contributor
JREwing
Posts: 57
Registered: ‎04-18-2010

Re: Nook vs. Kindle

Excellent post.  I'm with you......I just want to turn my ereader on, find the book at the lowest price, and start reading.  I don't want to search all over the internet for a book. 

B&N needs to step up to the plate, and SOON, or else it's lights out.

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FantasyRider
Posts: 250
Registered: ‎05-09-2010
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Re: Nook vs. Kindle


JREwing wrote:

Excellent post.  I'm with you......I just want to turn my ereader on, find the book at the lowest price, and start reading.  I don't want to search all over the internet for a book. 

B&N needs to step up to the plate, and SOON, or else it's lights out.


Odd that people believe that Kindle satisfies that requirement.  Last I checked there are many titles cheaper at non-Amazon locations (many instances at Barnes and Noble) than at Amazon.  I have no problems turning on my Nook, finding the book at the lowest price, and start reading via my Nook.

"You do not really understand something unless you can explain it to your grandmother." Albert Einstein
Frequent Contributor
JREwing
Posts: 57
Registered: ‎04-18-2010

Re: Nook vs. Kindle

FantasyRider, I am a Nook supporter.  I own a Nook, and I love my Nook.  The Nook is more advanced than the Kindle3.  I want the Nook to succeed.  But there are many here who are frustrated by Amazon putting books out weeks, if not months, before the Nook. And many of the books in my discipline are not even released on the Nook or in epub format.

As for price, I don't see hardly any price difference between Nook and Kindle.  There are a few here and there, but mostly they are the same.  My complaint is the availability of books.  I just contacted a publisher who only puts their books on Kindle.  Hopefully this will all change.

Those of us who are complaining are doing so because we want the Nook to succeed.

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zippyap
Posts: 36
Registered: ‎01-23-2010
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Re: Nook vs. Kindle

I own the Kindle 2nd gen. I actually ordered the latest Kindle, then cancelled the order to buy a Nook instead. I'm happy that I did because the latest Kindle seems to have a bunch of problems that needs to be sorted out first before I'd buy one. It may sound nitpicky, but on some of the new Kindles, owners are reporting that the letters are rubbing off the keys. They're even talking about putting clear nail polish on each key to protect the lettering or covering the keyboard with saran wrap. That would drive me NUTS!Of course, Amazon replaces each unit with no problem, but some customers just have the same thing happen all over again.

I'm sure there are lots more people NOT having problems with their new Kindles, than there are people with problems. With my luck though, I'd be in the latter set.

 

Correspondent
Jodisims
Posts: 60
Registered: ‎06-20-2010

Re: Nook vs. Kindle

The availability of books is a non-issue for me.  There have been a few that were not available, true.  But either I found them somewhere else and sideloaded them or I just decided to read something else until my book can be found - after all I literally have thousands of options - do I really have to read THAT book RIGHT NOW?.  I don't mind doing this while BN goes through it's growing pains of acquiring digial media.  And if I have to contact a publisher now and again to help that happen I'm happy to do so.  Why?  Because I feel like I belong to the Barnes and Noble family.  I feel part of a community that is trying to succeed against all odds.  We are David to Amazon's Goliath. I love amazon, don't get me wrong, I just love my Nook more :smileyhappy:

 

Romanticism aside, being a new product I bought the Nook with faith that it will grow and improve.   And it has.  And I have faith it will continue to do so.

I have never let my schooling interfere with my education ~ Mark Twain

click here for information about sideloading library books
click here to view Nook user guide
Frequent Contributor
geertm
Posts: 1,193
Registered: ‎02-09-2010

Re: Nook vs. Kindle


bobwa wrote:

Thank you for an excellent, thoughtful post.  I have been thinking much the same way.  When I first got my nook I got a kick out of searching through various sources for a book I wanted at a reasonable price.  And, I established a very beneficial relationship with our library.  Over time, I've tired of the hunt.  And, I have come to resent B&N pricing that is so erratic that every transaction has to be evaluated.  Why should it ever be true that an ebook costs more than an available DTB?  I continue to use the library frequently, and for that reason alone I prefer the nook to the Kindle.  But, I am perplexed at the B&N approach.  They have an excellent ereader with features that distinguish it.  But, as the market matures, most customers will just be about reading books -- the books they want, when they want them, at a price that doesn't seem exploitive.  B&N makes many pronouncements about being all in with ebooks.  I don't find their behavior to match their public pronouncements.  If Amazon decides to open its platform to ePUB the game will be over.  If I were B&N I'd like my future to be in my hands, not in those of a competitor.


Most e-books that are more expensive than the DTB are agency 5 books. Those books have a fixed price by the publisher. Bookstores are not allowed to discount those books.

Those books will be just as expensive at the Kindle store, and you can read the same complaints about bookprices at the Kindle board.

Contributor
Shih_Tzu
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎10-11-2010
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Re: Nook vs. Kindle

I'm considering buying a Nook after I found out that it read ePub & PBF as I want to get my eBooks from different sources  but I'm also an author and I just found out that Kindle has a way to 'self-publish' and 'sell'. Does Nook have that and is the ability worth buying the Kindle?

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RedRapier
Posts: 660
Registered: ‎06-26-2010

Re: Nook vs. Kindle

[ Edited ]

B&N does indeed offer that ability with the just-launched PubIt!

 

http://pubit.barnesandnoble.com/pubit_app/bn?t=pi_reg_home

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MikeThinks
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎08-15-2010
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Re: Nook vs. Kindle

After much long personal debate, it has become clear to me that my B&N and the Nook is just not cutting it for me.  Dozens of books I want are available on Amazon that are nowhere to be found on BN, the new Kindle screen looks quite a bit better as well.  Add to that the fact that the Nook software feels stagnated....I mean when you "tout" that you can now go to any page in a book...well that means the bar was pretty low to start with.

 

I really want to like my Nook more...but the PDF support falls so far short...the book list is almost unmanageable with no folders or organization...the selection is just not where it needs to be.

 

Sorry BN, I tried.  Sure I'll still own a Nook for what benefits it offers...but my future purchases will be going to Amazon.

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Shih_Tzu
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎10-11-2010
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Re: Nook vs. Kindle

 


RedRapier wrote:

B&N does indeed offer that ability with the just-launched PubIt!

 

http://pubit.barnesandnoble.com/pubit_app/bn?t=pi_reg_home


I just checked Pipit! and I am delighted! 2 weeks ago I had never even heard of eBooks and now I can't wait to get my Nook. Open source books and the ability to self-pub without all the expense. What could be better? I do write for a monthly magazine but had given up on seeing a book with my name on the cover. Now I'll have an eBook out and won't need to carry a pickup load of books trying to sell them. Thanx again for all your help.

 

Doug_Pardee
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Self-e-publishing

In addition to PubIt!, you can also distribute through Smashwords. Smashwords will get you into all of the big e-book stores in one step instead of you having to work with each store individually, but your royalties will be lower (around 45% instead of 65-70%) and the formatting of your e-book needs to be relatively simple—it's mainly aimed at fiction like short stories and novels. Smashwords also allows free e-books, which PubIt! doesn't… obviously, the lower royalty rate at Smashwords is irrelevant for free e-books.

 

Personally, I'd distribute a non-free e-book directly through Amazon and B&N (PubIt!) because those are the big outlets and the higher royalty rates would make it worth my time, and I'd also distribute through Smashwords to reach the other e-book stores. For distributing a free e-book, I'd go strictly through Smashwords.

 

One annoyance: I believe that if you publish directly on Amazon, you still need to have a Kindle in order to check the quality of your product. :smileymad:

 

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sabst79
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎01-15-2010
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Re: Self-e-publishing

 


Doug_Pardee wrote:

In addition to PubIt!, you can also distribute through Smashwords. Smashwords will get you into all of the big e-book stores in one step instead of you having to work with each store individually, but your royalties will be lower (around 45% instead of 65-70%) and the formatting of your e-book needs to be relatively simple—it's mainly aimed at fiction like short stories and novels. Smashwords also allows free e-books, which PubIt! doesn't… obviously, the lower royalty rate at Smashwords is irrelevant for free e-books.

 

Personally, I'd distribute a non-free e-book directly through Amazon and B&N (PubIt!) because those are the big outlets and the higher royalty rates would make it worth my time, and I'd also distribute through Smashwords to reach the other e-book stores. For distributing a free e-book, I'd go strictly through Smashwords.

 

One annoyance: I believe that if you publish directly on Amazon, you still need to have a Kindle in order to check the quality of your product. :smileymad:

 


Can't you just download the free app for PC or Mac and verify formatting/quality there?