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Nallia
Posts: 4,758
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Registered: ‎02-15-2010

Re: Why do free NOOKbooks require a credit card number when no purchase is necessary?


Wylee wrote:
I was a little annoyed when i first discovered i had to have my cc on file in order to download free books. Then i was irritated when i downloaded one, and when i wanted to read it, i got a pop up message saying i have to enter the cc number to unlock the book. Wow, talk about frustrating! Then i read on this discussion panel that if for some reason i get a new cc, all my previously purchased ebooks and apps will be gone. WTH, electronic or not, i paid full price for them and they should be mine forever, no matter what! So now, the rest of my life, if i wanna keep my stuff, i gotta keep on giving B&N my cc? I guess i should have gotten the kindle. i know i'm gonna avoid buying my ebooks here from now on. Anyone got some other sites for buying ebooks they can recommend?
1. I have never been asked to enter my cc number into my NOOK or on any NOOK app in order to open a book I already bought that wasn't sideloaded. I don't know why this happens to some people, but I think it must be a device glitch. 2. The bold edits patently untrue. You don't lose anything when you change your cc number on your account. I've had NOOKs for almost two years and have changed my cc number four times since I bought my first one in February 2010. I have never lost access to a single book or app. Books and apps are encrypted with the cc on file at the time of download, not the time of purchase. Some prefer to archive and unarchive old books so the cc numbers they are associated with changes to the new ones on their accounts, but it isn't necessary for them to work. The NOOK stores the encryption key needed to open them (which is a number that is generated randomly from the cc number you have on file and not the cc number itself).
Frequent Contributor
geertm
Posts: 1,193
Registered: ‎02-09-2010

Re: Why do free NOOKbooks require a credit card number when no purchase is necessary?


Wylee wrote:
I was a little annoyed when i first discovered i had to have my cc on file in order to download free books. Then i was irritated when i downloaded one, and when i wanted to read it, i got a pop up message saying i have to enter the cc number to unlock the book. Wow, talk about frustrating! Then i read on this discussion panel that if for some reason i get a new cc, all my previously purchased ebooks and apps will be gone. WTH, electronic or not, i paid full price for them and they should be mine forever, no matter what! So now, the rest of my life, if i wanna keep my stuff, i gotta keep on giving B&N my cc? I guess i should have gotten the kindle. i know i'm gonna avoid buying my ebooks here from now on. Anyone got some other sites for buying ebooks they can recommend?


The I do not know where you read this information but it is not true!

The books are encrypted with your default credit card when they are downloaded. This encryption is complete enclosed within the ebook file. After downloading a book it has no connection whatsoever to your credit card or to B&N. Even if the credit card and B&N would no longer exist, you would still be able to read your books on any device supporting the DRM. You do not need B&N for this. You can copy a book as many times as you like, to as many devices as you like.

If you want your books encrypted with another credit card. just download a new copy with that card as the default credit card.

Also you only have to input you credit card info once. It will be remembered for all other books.

 

Kindle DRM ties your books to the hardware ID of a specific Kindle device. Unlike B&N ebooks you can not copy an ebook file to read it on another device. If you want to read a book on another device, that device has to login to your Kindle account, and you have to download a new version from Amazon (using Amazon's DRM server), that can only be read on that device.

If Amazon's DRM server would no longer exist, you would not be able to read your Kindle books on any other device than the ones to books are stored on at that time.

 

The above should make clear with DRM system is the least restrictive and the most future proof.

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sparks16
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Registered: ‎01-09-2012
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Re: Why do free NOOKbooks require a credit card number when no purchase is necessary?


bklvr896 wrote:

That is because the DRM that Amazon uses is tied to the device.  In other words, each device you want to read the book on has to be registered to the account.  So a family, in order to share books, would have to all be registered on the same account and I think there is a limit of 6 devices.  I have the Kindle App on my computer and phone and each one of those is registered to the account.

 

With the B&N DRM, it's not tied to the device.  So families can share books without sharing an account.  Which means if husband and wife generally don't read the same books, but occasionally do, rather than having their Nooks cluttered with books they'll never read, they have separate accounts, and simply sideload the books to the other's device.

 

It's simply a different method of DRM.  B&N chose not to tie it to specific devices.  For some, the B&N DRM is a better option, for those who don't want to put a cc on file for whatever reason, it may not be the better option.  I prefer the B&N DRM, as I can share books with my mother but I don't have to share an account with her.

 


Between the two, I think Amazon made a better choice -- it's invisible, very much like Apple's DRM.  Frankly, until reading this discussion, I wasn't aware that the Kindle had DRM.  The Nook's hits you from the get-go.  What's worse, there's no real advance warning -- it's just a bizarre requirement that's made necessary by a technical choice they made.  I know that the last time I was in a B&N store and their salesperson tried to convince me how great it was, she didn't mention anything about my credit card.

 

Also, I think the Amazon cloud reader isn't tied to my laptop.

 

But, regardless, B&N could offer both DRM styles -- "If you only want to use read this book on devices registered to your account, click this button and you don't need your CC info.  Otherwise, give us your CC info and you can 'sideload' to your heart's content."

 

Does anybody actually sideload?  Is it even possible to copy a nook book from my iPad to, say, my wife's laptop?  Seems a lot of trouble for something 95% of people don't do.

Bibliophile
bklvr896
Posts: 4,819
Registered: ‎12-31-2009

Re: Why do free NOOKbooks require a credit card number when no purchase is necessary?


sparks16 wrote:

bklvr896 wrote:

That is because the DRM that Amazon uses is tied to the device.  In other words, each device you want to read the book on has to be registered to the account.  So a family, in order to share books, would have to all be registered on the same account and I think there is a limit of 6 devices.  I have the Kindle App on my computer and phone and each one of those is registered to the account.

 

With the B&N DRM, it's not tied to the device.  So families can share books without sharing an account.  Which means if husband and wife generally don't read the same books, but occasionally do, rather than having their Nooks cluttered with books they'll never read, they have separate accounts, and simply sideload the books to the other's device.

 

It's simply a different method of DRM.  B&N chose not to tie it to specific devices.  For some, the B&N DRM is a better option, for those who don't want to put a cc on file for whatever reason, it may not be the better option.  I prefer the B&N DRM, as I can share books with my mother but I don't have to share an account with her.

 


Between the two, I think Amazon made a better choice -- it's invisible, very much like Apple's DRM.  Frankly, until reading this discussion, I wasn't aware that the Kindle had DRM.  The Nook's hits you from the get-go.  What's worse, there's no real advance warning -- it's just a bizarre requirement that's made necessary by a technical choice they made.  I know that the last time I was in a B&N store and their salesperson tried to convince me how great it was, she didn't mention anything about my credit card.

 

Also, I think the Amazon cloud reader isn't tied to my laptop.

 

But, regardless, B&N could offer both DRM styles -- "If you only want to use read this book on devices registered to your account, click this button and you don't need your CC info.  Otherwise, give us your CC info and you can 'sideload' to your heart's content."

 

Does anybody actually sideload?  Is it even possible to copy a nook book from my iPad to, say, my wife's laptop?  Seems a lot of trouble for something 95% of people don't do.


I prefer the BN DRM because I share books with my mom and a close friend.  I couldn't do that with a Kindle unless we were all registered to the same account.  I email the books to my mom and she saves them to her computer and then sideloads them to the Nook.

 

As far as offering both DRMs.  They would have to set up two entirely different systems to sell the books, something I doubt any retailer would be willing to do.  Not to mention, it's likely the majority of the users would simply be confused by having to chose one of two systems.

 

I read about families who share books but not accounts on here, so I would guess more people are sharing than you might think.

Distinguished Bibliophile
RHWright
Posts: 1,622
Registered: ‎10-21-2009

Re: Why do free NOOKbooks require a credit card number when no purchase is necessary?

Amazon definitely chose the KISS-ier option. It is simple and basically invisible.

 

I don't think it was necessarily the better choice.

 

B&N's scheme makes it easier for me to share books with my daughter.

 

Yes, if you have fears about your credit/debit card security, or don't have one, the Amazon way has advantages.

 

If that's not a stumbling block, the B&N system is, IMO, more flexible.

Doug_Pardee
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Ebooks with no-credit-card DRM

[ Edited ]

sparks16 wrote:

 

B&N could offer both DRM styles -- "If you only want to use read this book on devices registered to your account, click this button and you don't need your CC info.  Otherwise, give us your CC info and you can 'sideload' to your heart's content."


They could but they don't. If they did, the alternative wouldn't be wireless; it'd be Adobe EPUB. Personally, I think B&N's missing some business by not selling Adobe EPUB as an option, but that's their choice. The per-ebook fee that Adobe charges probably has something to do with it.

 

So for now, there's a simple solution: buy somewhere else which sells Adobe EPUB. Then your ebooks will be tied to your devices instead of to your credit card.

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
keriflur
Posts: 6,871
Registered: ‎01-05-2010

Re: Why do free NOOKbooks require a credit card number when no purchase is necessary?


sparks16 wrote:

 

But, regardless, B&N could offer both DRM styles -- "If you only want to use read this book on devices registered to your account, click this button and you don't need your CC info.  Otherwise, give us your CC info and you can 'sideload' to your heart's content."

 

Does anybody actually sideload?  Is it even possible to copy a nook book from my iPad to, say, my wife's laptop?  Seems a lot of trouble for something 95% of people don't do.


Offer both DRM styles?  That sure sounds like a mess.

 

I sideload.  Heck, most if not all of the forum regulars have sideloaded something at some point in time.  My parents sideload each other's books to their nooks all the time.  When I see them next we'll probably swap books with each other by sideloading.

 

As far as copying a nook book from your ipad to your wife's laptop, you probably could, if you can acess the download folder, but it would be much easier to simply log into your account on her machine and download the book from there.

 

--

 

As to the invisibility of the kindle DRM - I have never used a kindle, but I can tell you that the DRM on my nook is pretty much invisible.  I entered my credit card info years ago, before I got my nook.  When I bought my nook just I logged into it and started downloading books.  I never have to do anything besides log into my account.  The fact that in the time since I bought my first ebook I've had four phones, three laptops, and two nooks hasn't inconvenienced me the way it would have if I was using kindle DRM.

 

I've been a member of B&N for half my life (I'm 35) and have had a credit card on file with them since bn.com came into existance.  I have never once had a fraud issue because of B&N.

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Wylee
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Registered: ‎01-09-2012
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Re: Why do free NOOKbooks require a credit card number when no purchase is necessary?

OKAY, THANKS geertm,

I hope that's right, I don't want to have to be

giving B&N an updated cc number my whole life to keep my books. 

"Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body."
~Richard Steele~

"My test of a good novel is dreading to begin the last chapter."
~Thomas Helm~
Frequent Contributor
geertm
Posts: 1,193
Registered: ‎02-09-2010

Re: Why do free NOOKbooks require a credit card number when no purchase is necessary?


Wylee wrote:

OKAY, THANKS geertm,

I hope that's right, I don't want to have to be

giving B&N an updated cc number my whole life to keep my books. 


Just remember to make a backup of your books. The easiest way is to use Nook for PC to download the books to your PC. Than make a copy of the books to another folder/location. No ebook store can guarantee that your books will always be available for redownloading. This way you will always have your own copy of your books.

And if you want to download the books from B&N again, you need to have a valid credit card in your account.

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Sleeplessbooks
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎12-14-2011
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Re: Why do free NOOKbooks require a credit card number when no purchase is necessary?

robertVA: Why should customers ever have to get a prepaid credit card to access their books? That's not a good solution. We want to be able to manage our nook without using a credit card. Gift cards should be one acceptable route to make that happen.

Doug_Pardee: someone 12 years old can't legitimately have a B&N account?!?!? This breaks my heart, because it's dumb and stupid.  If what you say is true (and I trust that it is), Barnes and Noble is making it much, much harder for minors to enjoy reading from the comfort of a nook.  Kids can't enjoy reading without parental intervention, and that's just plain stupid.  Please note: I'm not yelling at you on this. I'm yelling at Barnes and Noble. I cannot fathom how they can justify this policy.

bklvr896: What's the problem with being limited to 6 devices?!? Precisely how many eReaders does your family need? From what I understand, Amazon's purchased eBooks have way better DRM support than B&N.  With Amazon, you can cancel your credit card, fail to supply them with a new one, and still have access to your old purchases.  Because after all, you paid for them. It's unethical to withhold purchases from customers due to a lack of CC# on file.

Wylee: I bet IndieBound has good ideas as to where else you can go.  Some independently-owned booksellers sell eBooks through other venues, and they'll be able to talk you through that process.  I don't know much about how it works yet, so I'm somewhat curious myself.

Nallia: When my mom's credit card expired, at some point her nook connected to a wifi network and checked the server to see if the number was still valid.  It wasn't.  That instant, she no longer had access to the books already on her nook.  Customer service refused to help her until she provided a new number.  This problem is very real, and B&N won't do anything about it.

geertm: What you're saying about the DRM isn't true.  See my above comments to Nallia.

Distinguished Scribe
Ya_Ya
Posts: 3,334
Registered: ‎09-29-2010

Re: Why do free NOOKbooks require a credit card number when no purchase is necessary?

[ Edited ]

@sleeplessbooks, clearly B&N is not the content seller (nor device manufacturer/provider) for you.  Perhaps you should get a Kindle.  Their system works exactly as you desire.  B&N's doesn't.  

 

I, personally, prefer B&N's current choice of DRM-scheme.

 

I feel like a broken record, but I'm going to copy this from where I've said it elsewhere:

 

Every content-seller has a DRM scheme.


Kindle's DRM scheme limits the number of devices a book can be displayed on -- for most things it's 6, but some it's 2 or even 1, and these devices must be registered to the same account - so you must share your account login with the device owner.  The other epub sellers (excluding Apple) use Adobe Adept which limits the book to only being displayed on devices registered to the same ADE account.  

 

I don't want to share an ADE account with my BFF or my father-in-law.  I will not share my B&N account with anyone, including my husband.  He has his own.

 

B&N uses Adobe's Social DRM which allows a purchased book to be displayed on an unlimited number of devices as long as one has access to the unlock information, ie; name and credit card number on file as default when the book is downloaded.  So, I can place my own books on any number of devices as long as I'm willing to type my credit card number into them.  (And, it can't be reverse-engineered -- so if the device is lost, someone finds it, they can't get my card number back out and buy things.)

 

It's the least-restrictive DRM scheme and one of the things I most like about B&N/NOOK.  I've shared a few books with my father-in-law and another few with my BFF, which I couldn't do if the books had come from any of the other vendors.

 

I really hope they don't change it.  :smileywink:

 

I understand why this DRM scheme doesn't work for some, and perhaps NOOK isn't the device for them.  But, for those for whom it works, it works very, very well. 

Bibliophile
bklvr896
Posts: 4,819
Registered: ‎12-31-2009

Re: Why do free NOOKbooks require a credit card number when no purchase is necessary?


Sleeplessbooks wrote:


bklvr896: What's the problem with being limited to 6 devices?!? Precisely how many eReaders does your family need? From what I understand, Amazon's purchased eBooks have way better DRM support than B&N.  With Amazon, you can cancel your credit card, fail to supply them with a new one, and still have access to your old purchases.  Because after all, you paid for them. It's unethical to withhold purchases from customers due to a lack of CC# on file.



It's not the limit of 6 devices so much, as I don't want to have to share an account with anyone else.  If you have kids, do you want them to share your account and have access to all the books you buy?  Do you want your Nook cluttered with their books?  Would you want to share an account with your mother or your spouse?  Because that's how it works with Amazon.  To share books, you share an account.  And if you read the TOS, you can only share an account with immediate family members.  

 

Unless you have essentially the exact same taste in reading material, you're device is going to be cluttered with books you'll never read. 

 

In any event, this is the DRM B&N chose, the majority of users don't seem to be upset with it, so I doubt they'll change it.

 

As far as not having access to your books, download them to your PC as a backup and problem is solved.

 

As far as under 13 not being able to have an account, I believe it's a legal issue.  When you set up an account, you are agreeing to the terms and conditions, similar to signing a contract.  A minor can't sign a contract.  Kids under 13 can't legally have a Facebook account either.  Amazon's terms and conditions say that "If you are under 18, you may use Amazon.com only with involvement of a parent or guardian".  Don't yell at B&N unless you want to yell at the rest of online world also.

Distinguished Correspondent
MegSLP
Posts: 146
Registered: ‎06-23-2010

Re: Why do free NOOKbooks require a credit card number when no purchase is necessary?

@Sleeplessbooks-- I alone have 4 Nooks first gent, STR, and the apps for iPad and iPhone). Throw my husband, mom, and sister-in-law and I couldn't benefit from Amazon. So, while you don't think people would have six devices, it is very possible. I like the credit card scheme. In addition, I have gone through 4 credit cards while using NOOK (two expired, one was stolen). I have never once had the device shut me out of my books. I bought the majority of my books on the card that was stolen and then bought the N2E. All of my books downloaded onto that device and opened just fine--without me ever entering the card number which had already been closed.
Doug_Pardee
Posts: 5,522
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Re: Why do free NOOKbooks require a credit card number when no purchase is necessary?


Sleeplessbooks wrote:

 

someone 12 years old can't legitimately have a B&N account?!?!? This breaks my heart, because it's dumb and stupid. ... I'm not yelling at you on this. I'm yelling at Barnes and Noble. I cannot fathom how they can justify this policy.


It's not B&N. It's US Federal Law. B&N is simply complying with the Child Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) which prohibits collecting personal information (such as an email address) from anyone under 13 without verifiable parental consent.

 

People continue to blame B&N for complying with laws. Canadians gripe when B&N complies with Canadian laws that restrict its operations in order to protect Indigo/Chapters, Kobo, etc., and Americans complain when B&N complies with US laws that restrict its operations in order to protect children.

 

If you don't like the laws, complain to your lawmakers. Don't complain that B&N is following the law.

 

New User
Reader2020
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-13-2012

Re: Why do free NOOKbooks require a credit card number when no purchase is necessary?

DRM only hinders legitimate customers - it has never stopped pirates.

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RHWright
Posts: 1,622
Registered: ‎10-21-2009
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Re: Why do free NOOKbooks require a credit card number when no purchase is necessary?


Reader2020 wrote:

DRM only hinders legitimate customers - it has never stopped pirates.


We're veering OT again, but what the heck.

 

Yes, DRM will not stop determined pirates. It does cut down on casual piracy. What it also does is hinder those who under no circumstances would pirate.

 

It's the simple psychology of loss prevention.

 

Experience has shown that a certain percentage of people (let's say 10%) that have decided to steal something will find a way to do. DRM it, encase it in barbwire, post snipers on the roof—they are going to try, and probably find, a way to steal it.

 

Another percentage (let's also say 10%) will never steal. What goes on in their head, we don't know, but their morals/ethics/code of honor/whatever preclude them from ever committing an act of theft. You could leave your doors wide open with no security whatsoever and they would still pay for the product before they left the store.

 

Then the big middle (with these faked up numbers, 80%) are the casual or situational decision makers. Given the opportunity, and weighing other factors, they'll decide if the act is worth the risk and what the consequences might be.

 

It's where a lot of rationalization comes in. Prices are too high. My one act won't hurt a big corporation. I wouldn't pay for it anyway, so it's not a lost sale. This company pays me sh*t, so they owe me. (This last one is an almost verbatim quote from an employee I discovered was stealing from the Borders where I worked at the time.)

 

Yes, would like to live in a world with more truly honest people. I would like to believe the existing fraction is over 10%.

 

But, then ask yourself: what little things have you taken, that didn't belong to you and were not offered to you for free?

 

Ever: Boosted some office supplies from work? Taken excess condiments from a restaurant? Found money on the floor of a business? Not spoken up when a cashier forgot to ring up an item or rang it up for less? Left work early, but turned in a full shift on your time sheet?

 

Then you're somewhere in the middle. Some of these things seem, and are, trivial. But my point is that most of us are not 100% honest or 100% dishonest. We fall somewhere along a spectrum in the middle that is determined by our personal ethics and the actions we take (or don't take) based on them. It's the individual judgement call that says, "here, now, I will do this, but I won't do that."

 

DRM, as annoying as it can be, prevents many people from casually doing what they might otherwise not do. (Thank you, Napster!)

 

My annoyance with it is no so much it's existence, but when it is used for other things than preventing piracy. Such as hindering portability. Companies are using it to try and lock in customers by making portability inconvenient at best and even illegal (if you break DRM).

 

I have no problem with DRM that keeps me from pirating. When it keeps me from the free use of my file (i.e. I can pretty much read it on any device I want) that's where I start to grumble.

 

To finally circle back on topic, the B&N DRM scheme is not perfect, but of the alternatives I've seen out there so far (other than going 100% DRM free) it seems the most flexible to me.

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Sleeplessbooks
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎12-14-2011
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Re: Why do free NOOKbooks require a credit card number when no purchase is necessary?

YA_YA: If it's not copyrighted, and if it's public domain, there's no call for DRM. There's no call for credit card numbers. In the case of books, it might be possible to find them on outside sites and sideload them. For apps, Barnes & Noble PROHIBITS users from sideloading apps.  The DRMs are not there at the behest of these publishers. It is a Barnes & Noble initiated requirement.  If your credit card's on file, then it becomes super easy to buy things, and that's good for B&N. That's it.

bklvr896: Incorrect. Barnes & Noble's DRMs are set up to revoke access to paid material until your credit card number is updated. This applies to backups on the PC and on your nook. And it's a dumb hassle that no human should ever be subjected to.

"The majority of users don't seem to be upset with it..."

There's no way you can possibly know that for sure. And I'm fairly convinced it's not.

"Don't yell at B&N unless you want to yell at the rest of online world also."

Good. Because I'm already yelling at the rest of the world. Fun times. Because honestly, the current digital content landscape is so far behind where it should be, it's not funny. It's pretty disgusting. There's NO reason why I shouldn't be allowed to install third-party apps on my nook. And I'm letting B&N know that.  Or should I remain silent like the majority of Barnes & Noble consumers, and deny B&N the opportunity to improve? Because if I'm not vocal about what I want out of their products, they're left in the dark. And that's not fair to them.

MegSLP: Were you keeping a current CC# on file at all times? Because if you do, you have access to your books. If you don't keep it up to date, then you don't have access.

Doug_Pardee: Allowing minors to load on eBooks with gift cards prevents MANY MANY problems with the COPPA laws.  Plainly put, a parent can register an account for their kids using the parent's email address. The parent can load the nook up with gift cards. The kid can take the nook and run with it. I respect the COPPA law. I don't respect B&N for this.

Here is a response to everyone: Why am I a horrible monster for providing criticism to Barnes and Noble?!? Post your disagreements with me, fine. But please stop telling me I shouldn't be criticizing B&N for it. Because I'm gonna. Ok? It's time to lay this portion of the debate to rest, permenantly. I am going to complain to B&N as I see fit. If B&N doesn't like it, they're the ones that need to respond. But I understand that in general, they welcome constructive feedback. So... this is my constructive feedback.

Please debate the points with me. Don't debate my motives for making them.

RHWright: I agree that B&N's DRM scheme isn't perfect.  It's not 100% terrible, either. But I want to offer my feedback in some manner or another.  It seems that the only way they do listen is to enter into public forums much like this. And besides, I do enjoy these conversations, as I do tend to learn things in the process -- no matter how thick my skull may seem to be right now.

What I want to know is why there's DRMs on things that fundamentally can't be pirated? You can't pirate public domain works. You can't pirate many government publications, such as annual reports and so forth. In many cases where content providers are literally giving their content away free to everyone, it's really hard to "steal" it in any manner.

Now, when it comes to implementing a DRM system to paid content, it's really hard for me to wrap my mind around what's really gonna help the bookstores, publishers, authors, and customers. What I do know is that the whole realm of paid digital content is still in its infancy, and consumer rights has not received its due attention. I hope I am not out of line by expressing my concerns to Barnes and Noble.

Wordsmith
tmr4
Posts: 268
Registered: ‎05-08-2010
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Re: Why do free NOOKbooks require a credit card number when no purchase is necessary?

I wasn't thrilled with the cc requirement but I got over my qualms by getting a B&N card. I figured if anyone hacks B&N, then its a B&N based card that is compromised. The rewards keep the giftcards coming to the extent I rarely ever pay for books otherwise. As for free content I suppose it is easier for B&N to use one system for all content and one really can't fault them for prioritizing it to the content that makes them money. Also with the N1E you can read sideloaded content without a cc on file. You simply have to supply a cc, download your books to your pc, sideload them to the N1E, then delete your cc from your account. This won't work for nook for pc and I've read, but haven't tried, for the NST. This is one reason I've kept my N1E after I got the NST. I backup all of my purchases to my pc so even the first couple steps aren't needed. I can also let my daughter use it without the parental control issues that are harder to solve with the other devices.
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MegSLP
Posts: 146
Registered: ‎06-23-2010
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Re: Why do free NOOKbooks require a credit card number when no purchase is necessary?


Sleeplessbooks wrote:

MegSLP: Were you keeping a current CC# on file at all times? Because if you do, you have access to your books. If you don't keep it up to date, then you don't have access.


Actually, on two occasions, I did not have a valid credit card on file and I still had access to all of my books.
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frantastk
Posts: 743
Registered: ‎06-29-2010

Re: Why do free NOOKbooks require a credit card number when no purchase is necessary?

I actually like B&N's DRM scheme. Really. My kids share a nook. They are 10, 7, and 4. I haven't gotten around to setting up a separate account for them because it is just easier for me to buy them the books they want and sideload them to their nook. Currently, their nook is unregistered but it has tons of books since I've been collecting e-books I thought they'd like ever since I got my first nook. They'd have to give me the nook to buy their books anyway, since I am not giving such young children full access to buy whatever they want. I backup my books everytime I buy something (or as soon after as I remember) so all my purchases are backed up. I did have to change my credit card and did not loose access to the books on my nook before I out the new one on. I had wifi turned off so B&N had no way of communicating with my nook. If you back up your books you won't lose access to the ones those either. I do have a couple of Kindle books on my PC. And I have to tell you, I hate the Kindle app. I also greatly dislike ADE. I do believe that B&N allows the publisher to opt out of DRM if they want to. There are some B&N books without DRM, but I don't think there's a way to find out which ones. I'm not defending B&N or DRM, I don't like that it's currently necessary. I don't know what a viable alternative would be. I do like B&N's drm better than the alternatives that I know about (Kindle, Adobe, etc.)