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New User
bwims
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎09-04-2013
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uk.nook.com appears to be guilty of fraudulent behaviour.

I'm hoping someone from B&N sees this, as I think it is pretty disgusting.

 

For a month or so, uk.nook.com had reduced the price of, in particular, the 16Gb Nook HD+ from £179 to £149 - a £30 reduction.  Their web site proclaimed "Quantities limited—hurry, offer ends 3 September" and their "Discount Offer Terms & Conditions" said: "This offer entitles customers to a discount off the list price for online purchases of NOOK® eReaders and Tablets (as listed below) beginning 3 July 2013 – 3 September 2013 11:59 PM UK time for a limited time only, quantities limited and continuing while supplies last"

These statements clearly implied that if one were not to order before 3rd September, the prices would almost certainly rise again.  I duly ordered a Nook and a spare power supply on the 2nd September for £149 and £15 respectively.

On the 4th September I was astonished to find that the "offer" had indeed ended and B&N had duly _lowered_ these prices to £129 and £10 respectively!

I feel that I have been defrauded out of £25 - %18 of the current price!  uk.nook.com must have known, when they took my order two days earlier, that prices would drop.  The use of the word "hurry", is a definite implication that I would suffer if I waited, instead of gain. 

 

If anyone from B&N is reading this, I would dearly like to know their thoughts.  Right now, I am considering returning it for a refund then re-ordering it.  Yes, I will lose the postage, but B&N will lose more.

Distinguished Bibliophile
bobstro
Posts: 3,765
Registered: ‎01-01-2012
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Re: uk.nook.com appears to be guilty of fraudulent behaviour.

[ Edited ]

Why not call and ask for the difference? Many shops in the US provide a 30 day price drop guarantee for exactly this situation. Worst case, get your refund and reorder at the lower price. Price reductions are a regular part of electronic device sales. At the time you bought it, that was less than the regular price. As to the legality of what they've done, check with a lawyer. If they'll make up the difference, it's probably not worth all this drama.

New User
bwims
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎09-04-2013
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Re: uk.nook.com appears to be guilty of fraudulent behaviour.

[ Edited ]

I don't think you appreciate the outrageous behaviour - or maybe it's so standard in the USA that you think nothing of it? - in saying "Hurry - offer ends September 3" and dropping the price on September 4.

How many people caught by this scam will not have noticed that the implied price rise was actually a drop? Far more than the people who actually bother to complain, I suspect.

Particularly since you have the benefit of low, low prices. $149 = £95 and I had to pay £149 =$232! Add that to the fact that you get paid more than we do, and you can see why I'm harping and "dramatising" over an 18% loss.

Yes, I have complained, yes the people on FB have said I'll get a refund (though customer support is making me wait 5 days for confirmation of this) but it's the dishonesty that disgusts me. Call me a whiner! I'm old enough to remember when companies had integrity.

Distinguished Bibliophile
bobstro
Posts: 3,765
Registered: ‎01-01-2012
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Re: uk.nook.com appears to be guilty of fraudulent behaviour.

[ Edited ]

I'm just not so quick to attribute to a grand conspiracy what is probably B&N's usual bungling of things. If you're able to get your refund, it doesn't seem to be anything overly malicious. They're making more work for themselves, after all. Any sort of price guarantee requires the consumer to pay attention. You have, and good on you for that.

 

I suspect there's not much difference in the actual law regarding such ploys. Are you sure what they've done actually fits the legal definition of "fraudulent behavior"? Shifty, perhaps. Poorly coordinated, more likely. Bad timing is what I suspect. With year-end approaching, B&N must still have so much stock, even with the sale you took advantage of, that they're desperate, especially if they're planning on releasing new devices anytime before Christmas.

 

B&N is effectively dumping these devices, so I don't think you're in any worse a position than anybody who paid full price a few months back, only to see prices drop by more than half days later. It happens. Nearly every electronic device I own has dropped in price since I bought it. On every one of them, they were more expensive the day before the price drop, and somebody surely bought one. I'm still miffed at Apple over the price I paid for my Apple II+!

 

I just have to wonder how many of the HD/+ series they stockpiled. They've been dumping them for months and they still seem to have plenty. Call and get your money and enjoy getting a good deal.

 

Don't feel offended. We're appreciative of the fact that you didn't do the usual "... and now I'm going to stomp away and buy a Kindle" bit that usually accompanies these posts! :smileyhappy:

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
keriflur
Posts: 6,620
Registered: ‎01-05-2010
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Re: uk.nook.com appears to be guilty of fraudulent behaviour.


bwims wrote:

I don't think you appreciate the outrageous behaviour - or maybe it's so standard in the USA that you think nothing of it? - in saying "Hurry - offer ends September 3" and dropping the price on September 4.

How many people caught by this scam will not have noticed that the implied price rise was actually a drop? Far more than the people who actually bother to complain, I suspect.

Particularly since you have the benefit of low, low prices. $149 = £95 and I had to pay £149 =$232! Add that to the fact that you get paid more than we do, and you can see why I'm harping and "dramatising" over an 18% loss.

Yes, I have complained, yes the people on FB have said I'll get a refund (though customer support is making me wait 5 days for confirmation of this) but it's the dishonesty that disgusts me. Call me a whiner! I'm old enough to remember when companies had integrity.


Marketing like this has been going on for as long as I've been alive, if not longer (I was born in the 70s) - in fact, we studied it in my psychology class in high school in the early 90s, from textbooks that had been written a decade earlier.  It's not new, and it shouldn't surprise you.

 

Thing about this one is that when they posted this, they were likely hoping to sell out before September 3, in which case there wouldn't have had to reduce the price further and your guess - that you needed to buy before Sept 3 to get the lower price (or, likely, a device at all) would have been correct.  But they didn't sell out.

 

Also, a lot of pricing decisions are made on the fly, meaning that the copy was likely written and published before the decision to lower the price further.  That decision may have happened on Sept 3.

 

In any case, as I stated in your other thread on the topic, the copy does not state anything that we know isn't true.  The deal you got ended on the 3rd, just like the copy said.  Whether quantities are limited is something we can't know, but I'd be willing to bet that they have a fixed number of nooks that they can sell at a reduced price (or maybe they have a fixed number of nooks period), which means that quantities really are limited.

 

What happened here is that you inferred meaning that wasn't there - you assumed the price would go up, but nowhere in the copy does it say that. You made an assumption and it turned out you were incorrect.  And you are already getting a refund.  So I don't see what the kerfluffle is about.