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Distinguished Bibliophile
MacMcK1957
Posts: 2,276
Registered: ‎07-25-2011
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Re: B&N eBook Format

Don't think so. Apple and Google and Samsung have been trading patent accusations all over the place, but I think BB has just suffered from not keeping up with the competition. When the market demanded new features to compete with iPhone and Android their responses were too little too late.
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keriflur
Posts: 6,807
Registered: ‎01-05-2010
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Re: B&N eBook Format


kamas716 wrote:
OT: and I realize I haven't followed BB very closely, but I thought most of BB problems had to do with patent infringement. Maybe I'm misremembering the headlines.

Huh. What I've seen is more of a general loss of market share since the iphone came out, and people began craving more screen space over physical keyboards.  Also, BB platform was more locked down, less conducive to apps, so as apps began to take off, BB was left behind.  BB has since changed to move with the times, but they were very much a follower and it was too little too late for a lot of folks.  I stopped following them after I made the move to Android (after bouncing from BB to Palm and back a few times), so if they've gotten into patent issues I wouldn't have heard about it.

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ck_h
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎10-13-2013
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Re: B&N eBook Format

The infamous patent issue that RIM ran into was long, long ago. Around 2000, NTP sued RIM for violating their patent on a "mobile email device". NTP is the archetypal patent troll. They exist solely to file/purchase overbroad patents on trivial "inventions" which they have no intention of developing (nor have the technical ability to even ponder how such inventions could be developed).

Their business model is basically to file a patent for a device which might potentially exist in the future when someone puts in the time and effort to make the technology possible, and if and when such a company succeeds, sue them for hundreds of millions of dollars.

Basically, they're not inventors or innovators. They're just a bunch of lawyers who exploit the incompetence of our judicial system and the USPTO. RIM was their first victim, but they've since extracted licensing fees from Palm, AT&T, Nextel, Verizon, and T-Mobile. So they're making hundreds of millions of dollars off of RIM and everyone else, even though they've never put out a single product or developed any of the technologies that enable mobile email to work. All they had to do was file frivolous patents that have zero informational content and contribute nothing to society.
Distinguished Bibliophile
MacMcK1957
Posts: 2,276
Registered: ‎07-25-2011
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Re: B&N eBook Format

Patent trolls are routine.  I've heard radio commercials to lobby Congress to do something about it.  A company I work with is battling a company claiming to own the patent on the "store locator" button.  Seriously.