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Bibliophile
bklvr896
Posts: 4,781
Registered: ‎12-31-2009

Re: LendMe feature - lending eBooks limitations.


Ravenswold wrote:

I have to admit that finding out all of this via the forums today has driven me a little nuts. What does it mean for me and my friends? Well:

 

1) It makes me realize that pirating eBooks is a better idea than buying legitimate copies, because oddly enough, I can at least share the ones I didn't purchase; and

 

2) When I do purchase books, I might as well start buying hard copies, because at least I can lend those without some idiotic limitation from the publisher. 

 

The digital revolution is not quite here.


The publishers may be wrong in the lending limitations, but it shouldn't be an excuse to do something illegal.  That old saying, two wrongs don't make a right.

 

And they'd probably be less likely to be so strict on this if people wouldn't try and set up sites where you can post your books and lend the people they don't know.  You don't lend your printed books to people you don't know, like on the other side of the country, do you?  Lending to friends, I agree, we should be able to do that but until they can figure out how to stop the "napster" type sites if the allowed lending, I don't see it happening.

Frequent Contributor
geertm
Posts: 1,188
Registered: ‎02-09-2010

Re: LendMe feature - lending eBooks limitations.

[ Edited ]

Ravenswold wrote:

I have to admit that finding out all of this via the forums today has driven me a little nuts. What does it mean for me and my friends? Well:

 

1) It makes me realize that pirating eBooks is a better idea than buying legitimate copies, because oddly enough, I can at least share the ones I didn't purchase; and

 

2) When I do purchase books, I might as well start buying hard copies, because at least I can lend those without some idiotic limitation from the publisher. 

 

The digital revolution is not quite here.


The great thing about B&N is that they are using a social DRM. That means that unlike with Kindle and Adobe DRM there are no technical restrictions that prevent you from sharing an B&N ebook. Every B&N ebook can be shared as many times as you want, with as many devices as you want, just by copying it to a device (or software reader). Anyone who knows the credit card number and name the book was encrypted with (the social part of the DRM) can read the book.

Distinguished Bibliophile
RHWright
Posts: 1,612
Registered: ‎10-21-2009

Re: LendMe feature - lending eBooks limitations.


Ravenswold wrote:

I have to admit that finding out all of this via the forums today has driven me a little nuts. What does it mean for me and my friends? Well:

 

1) It makes me realize that pirating eBooks is a better idea than buying legitimate copies, because oddly enough, I can at least share the ones I didn't purchase; and

 

2) When I do purchase books, I might as well start buying hard copies, because at least I can lend those without some idiotic limitation from the publisher. 

 

The digital revolution is not quite here.


1) While I can ethically support some arguments for breaking DRM (currently against the law) on content I have purchased and/or obtained legally, "sharing" is not one of them.

 

There is just too much involved to ensure everyone is acting properly. With physical book, there is only one object to pass around and only one person can have it at a time. To act in the same way with a file, I must delete it & all my back-up copies once I have lent the file. The person I lend it to must delete the file and all copies when they give it back to me. (If the person I "lend" it to "lends" it to someone else, they must act in the same way & the chain becomes longer.) Somehow, I don't see this happening and we have Napster all over again, which proved to be illegal and, IMO, unethical.

 

Opinions may vary; justify it in your own mind how you will, just because you feel that what the publishers are doing is "bad" (though legal) doesn't make piracy "good" (though illegal).

 

2) If lending is a key factor for you (along with other rights that pertain to physical ownership of a copy of book that do not apply to ebooks), then you should be buying hard copies. You may see the limitations as idiotic; publishers see it as protecting the content they have paid for the right to copy and distribute.

 

The technology is not in place to make owning and passing along (through loan or resale) ebooks seamlessly identical to what has been done for hundreds of years with physical books. Personally, I don't see society and the industry evolving in a way to make it so, no matter how much I would wish.

 

Capitalism still holds, god help us all. We haven't yet gotten to the Star Trek point where all human knowledge seems to be free and at your fingertips for the asking.

New User
pleasantly_parsimonious
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎03-19-2012
0 Kudos

Re: LendMe feature - lending eBooks limitations.

The LendMe feature is a great idea, at least compared to not having any option at all.

 

But lending only once?

 

Lending for only two weeks?

 

Some books are actually pretty long, and gee, maybe I need to do other things than lay around reading all day.  Or I have interruptions that don't actually come scheduled and take quite a while. 

 

I realize that the publishers want to push book sales, but at least let me work on reading a lent book like I do other books....  until i'm done with it!  Or at least longer than two weeks.

 

Further if you lend to someone who has a Nook App on their phone, for example, the reading experience doesn't help with long sessions of reading......

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