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Contributor
GP10Ellison
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎03-29-2010

Wifi issue

[ Edited ]

My problem is that I use static IP addresses and WEP.

It can accept all the info for the security side but as far as I can tell you can't manually set the IP address or DNS information.

 

Any thoughts or suggestions

Inspired Wordsmith
icebike
Posts: 4,434
Registered: ‎11-30-2009
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Re: Wifi issue

Suggestion:

 

Stop using static IPs.  There is no reason to do this.  If you need a machine to always get the same IP use a reservation in the router for this.  All modern routers have this.

 

 

Contributor
Happy_Buddhaman
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎04-21-2010
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Re: Wifi issue

I found WEP unusable. I had to switch my router to WPA2 and it picked it up instantly.

Contributor
GP10Ellison
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎03-29-2010
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Re: Wifi issue

The choice is reset every machine in the house which are all static along with the router as they have been for a decade or find a way to set a static on this one item.

 

I went static for a reason.  All I asked was does anyone know of a way to setup static IP on the nook or if it is in the works....

Contributor
GP10Ellison
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎03-29-2010
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Re: Wifi issue

WEP isn't the issue...static IP and manually set DNS is

Inspired Wordsmith
icebike
Posts: 4,434
Registered: ‎11-30-2009
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Re: Wifi issue

 

GP10Ellison wrote:

The choice is reset every machine in the house which are all static along with the router as they have been for a decade or find a way to set a static on this one item.

 

I went static for a reason.  All I asked was does anyone know of a way to setup static IP on the nook or if it is in the works....

 

 

 

Your reasons for going static 10 years ago wasn't valid then, and hasn't improved with age.

 

Your router has a built in DHCP server, and every one of them can handle a mix of static as well as dynamic IPs.   Further, every router allows you to set the DNS servers given to DHCP addresses.

 

There is no way to set Static IPs up, and it is highly unlikely to be in the works.   Its 2010 for pete sake.

Correspondent
Mandroid
Posts: 184
Registered: ‎02-03-2010
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Re: Wifi issue

In other words, no, there is no way to set a static IP address on the nook.  :smileyhappy:

"5 out of 4 people don't understand fractions"
Contributor
DLReid
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎12-07-2009
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Re: Wifi issue

Actually you can have a mixed setup of dhcp and static ip addresses on your network if you so choose to do so.  There are reasons to do this for some personal or business networks.  I really hate it when some people act like they are the experts and the only ones who know how everything related to networking is supposed to be. 

 

One way to have your nook have a static ip address is to setup your router to be a dhcp server (if you have static addresses set up for your computers be sure to set the dhcp range to a different address range) and then set up a reservation for your nook using its mac address and have the router assign the same address to it every time.   If your nook is the only thing that will be connecting by dhcp you could set up the router to only use one ip address for dhcp.

 

I recently purchased a new dual band router that has the capability to actually have a guest account that is completely separate from my main account and this is the one I use to have the nook login through because if I have to change the password or other settings it does not affect the rest of my network.  The address reservation works very well and my nook has the same address assigned every time.

 

 

 

 

Contributor
GP10Ellison
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎03-29-2010
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Re: Wifi issue

 

DLReid wrote:

Actually you can have a mixed setup of dhcp and static ip addresses on your network if you so choose to do so.  There are reasons to do this for some personal or business networks.  I really hate it when some people act like they are the experts and the only ones who know how everything related to networking is supposed to be. 

 

One way to have your nook have a static ip address is to setup your router to be a dhcp server (if you have static addresses set up for your computers be sure to set the dhcp range to a different address range) and then set up a reservation for your nook using its mac address and have the router assign the same address to it every time.   If your nook is the only thing that will be connecting by dhcp you could set up the router to only use one ip address for dhcp.

 

I recently purchased a new dual band router that has the capability to actually have a guest account that is completely separate from my main account and this is the one I use to have the nook login through because if I have to change the password or other settings it does not affect the rest of my network.  The address reservation works very well and my nook has the same address assigned every time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for a real answer and not being an ass like most people on message boards.

I'll give this a shot

Contributor
GP10Ellison
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎03-29-2010
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Re: Wifi issue

 

icebike wrote:

 

GP10Ellison wrote:

The choice is reset every machine in the house which are all static along with the router as they have been for a decade or find a way to set a static on this one item.

 

I went static for a reason.  All I asked was does anyone know of a way to setup static IP on the nook or if it is in the works....

 

 

 

Your reasons for going static 10 years ago wasn't valid then, and hasn't improved with age.

 

Your router has a built in DHCP server, and every one of them can handle a mix of static as well as dynamic IPs.   Further, every router allows you to set the DNS servers given to DHCP addresses.

 

There is no way to set Static IPs up, and it is highly unlikely to be in the works.   Its 2010 for pete sake.

 

 

didn't give you my reason for static since it's not your business.

 

so you don't know what is valid or isn't.  A simple "you can mix static and DHCP" would have been sufficient without your condescension

Contributor
GP10Ellison
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎03-29-2010
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Re: Wifi issue

It worked using the mix of static and DHCP on my router just in case anyone wants to know for their own use

Inspired Wordsmith
icebike
Posts: 4,434
Registered: ‎11-30-2009
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Re: Wifi issue

 

GP10Ellison wrote:

 

didn't give you my reason for static since it's not your business.

 

so you don't know what is valid or isn't. 

 

 

 

There are no valid reasons for setting up an entire network using static IPs when a DHCP server is present.  Therefore I din't need to know the reason.

 

You seem to have an awfully big chip on your shoulder for a guy that was given the correct solution on the very first reply moments after posting your question.

New User
MikeObi
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎07-07-2010
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Re: Wifi issue

I realize that this is an older post, so it will probably never get read, but I figured I would mention something that made sense to me while I was trying to bring my wife's Nook onto our home network. The ability to set static IP's is something they should definitely remedy on the Nook. Anything with a MAC Address should have the ability to change the standard IP address. The solution provided which allows you to assign an IP via DHCP which then can be turned off is more of a workaround and is in fact what I did. However, it does not show the benefits of statically assigning IP addresses, which is:

 

  • Increased security; The ability to assign IP addresses statically means no random user with a laptop and password-cracking program can hack your network without using a particular IP scheme.
  • Increased knowledge; The knowledge of which IP's you have gives you the ability to track usage, activity, and violations (In case you do somehow get hacked).
  • Subnet cropping; The use of a variable length subnet-mask which allows you to further subnet the standard Class C subnet also further increases your security. While you can do this with DHCP, it is most uncommon. Most DHCP servers (not all) use a standard Class C subnet (255.255.255.0). 

One criticism to you, GP10Ellison,

  • The only criticism I may have is the usage of WEP instead of WPA2, which is, in fact, a more secure and harder-to-crack wireless security standard. I would definitely upgrade to WPA2 at your earliest convenience. Otherwise, you're just a target waiting to be hacked.

To you, icebike, I work in network security, I promise you that Static IP addressing is very valid. Don't discount it.

 

To those who did post with options, thanks. I tried to look for a statis option before I just did the workaround anyways.

 

To Barnes & Noble, FIX IT!!

Inspired Correspondent
Big_Dave_H
Posts: 334
Registered: ‎06-22-2010
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Re: Wifi issue

[ Edited ]

MikeObi wrote:

 

  • Increased security; The ability to assign IP addresses statically means no random user with a laptop and password-cracking program can hack your network without using a particular IP scheme.

 

 

 Static IPs are very easy to hack into and provide almost no extra security.

 


MikeObi wrote:

 

  • Subnet cropping; The use of a variable length subnet-mask which allows you to further subnet the standard Class C subnet also further increases your security. While you can do this with DHCP, it is most uncommon. Most DHCP servers (not all) use a standard Class C subnet (255.255.255.0). 

 

Most home routers do allow you to change the subnet mask.  Subnetting is not something most people know how to do, so most routers supplement this by having a "starting address" and "address range" or "number of addresses" function which allows you to limit the number of devices which can connect at any given time. 

 

EDIT:  I am not sure you understand the difference between subnetting and variable length subnetting. 

 

Instead of doing the things you mention, it is far better to turn on "MAC Filtering" or the "Access Control List". 

 


 

MikeObi wrote:

 

 I promise you that Static IP addressing is very valid.


 

 

It is very valid, but not so much from an anti-hacking standpoint.  It is valid if you have a device that you putting in a DMZ or enabling NAT access to.  Static IPs pose barely a speed bump to hackers. 

 

 

 

Inspired Wordsmith
icebike
Posts: 4,434
Registered: ‎11-30-2009
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Re: Wifi issue

Static IPs are totally useless in a wireless environment for security purposes. (Sure they work, although not on the nook, but they provide no security at all).

 

Unlike a wired environment, where the static ips are all presumably present at all times, hackers need only wait for a wireless device to go off air and then assign themselves that ip.  Its childs play, and anyone working in "network security" should know this already.

 

This is totally pointless, because the nook does not allow you to set a static IP.  Game over.

 

If you want to use the same IP for your nook, simply set a reservation for it's mac address in your DHCP server, and issue it the same IP each time it connects.  This is great for routing purposes, but the nook does not need any inward routes.

 

Mac addresses are easily hacked, cloned, and spoofed.  So reservations provide no security either.  

 

Furthermore subnet cropping (silly name for adjusting the mask length) provides no security either, because you need only see an IP in use (wireshark, airsnort) and you know everything you need to know about the subnet.  The mask has no function in IP to IP transmissions.  Once you set your default gateway, you can set any mask you want, because it will never be used by the client side for routing.

 

But again, the nook does not allow setting a static IP, so the discussion is pointless.

 

 

New User
Traxman
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎12-20-2010
0 Kudos

Re: Wifi issue

.There are indeed very valid reasons to use static IP's and tightly regulated LAT's on devices that are connected full-time to networks utilizing proxy access (inbound, outbound, or network to network) as an extra layer of security. Internal IP's can be set to ranges which are invalid on and unreachable via the Internet, and the internal servers can alert the admin not only to invalid access attempts, but any duplicate IP addresses for devices that may have been "hacked" or discovered by someone attempting to determine the usable IP ranges. These measures may be used in addition to WEP, WPA and other security measures giving the hacker a more difficult task in getting to where he wants to be. Cracking a piece of a network does not always achieve access to the data being guarded.

 

Good answers here, but there are NO absolutes that work for everyone.  Somtimes old technology provides the best answer for some users for reasons that may be unique to the application, the architecture, or the needs of the organization.  I agree that the ability to set a static IP would be a good feature to implement on the device.  Some of us have been successfully useing these methods for decades and have pretty good records of security on our systems.

Correspondent
ps56k
Posts: 658
Registered: ‎10-24-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Wifi issue

It's interesting that someone asked about setting a static IP address,

and everyone jumps all over him lecturing on why he's an idiot for not using DHCP.

 

I was going to ask the same question about how to setup the Nook Color with a static IP,

and here's my reason WHY...

 

I would like to have my network protocol analyzer monitor the Nook Color traffic

and to accomplish that on a consistent basis - yup - I need a static IP address to monitor.

 

In fact, all the "special devices" around the house are setup with static IP addresses such as

- Tivo - HDTV - Bluray player - print server -

 

The other devices use the DHCP from the router -

laptops, desktops, smartphones, xbox, Nook, Kindle

 

SO yeah - most of the world functions very nicely using DHCP,

but in certain cases, there might be a reason to use a static IP address...

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
keriflur
Posts: 6,757
Registered: ‎01-05-2010
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Re: Wifi issue

You're responding to a thread that's 6 months old, so I'm guessing none of the previous posters are still checking this thread for answers....

Inspired Correspondent
Big_Dave_H
Posts: 334
Registered: ‎06-22-2010
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Re: Wifi issue

ps56k,

 

There are some here who poo-poo anything and everything when it comes to WiFi other than using WPA2.  

 

Yes, there are some instances when a static IP is a desired capability.  It does not necessarily add anything in regards to security, but it can be nice to always know what IP to look at to find a specific device, like maybe a WiFi webcam. 

 

For the average person with no networking background, DHCP is great as it allows for a very simple set-up and connection process for the user.  But IP addressing is really not all the difficult and there are a ton of tutorials and calculators out on the web, so static IPs are a great way for people to learn.  Many, if not most kids these days can't count back change correctly from a register, but they can do subnet masking for IPv4 in their head.

 

For more advanced users, as mentioned before, there are some practical uses for static IPs. 

 

So, we probably should not castigate people for using static IPs.  We might want to advise against it unless the person really knows what they are doing or explain the pros and cons to them. 

 

Personally, I would not mind seeing a choice for setting a static IP or using DHCP on the Nooks. 

Correspondent
ps56k
Posts: 658
Registered: ‎10-24-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Wifi issue

for Big_Dave_H -

 

tnx for the added comments, but just to clarify,

using a Static IP address has nothing at all to do with "security"... 

they are two totally different discussions...

 

it's DHCP vs Static IP - as one discusssion

 

it's "WiFi security" - as another discussion

comparing different implementations such as MAC filtering, WEP, WPA2, etc

 

 

 

 

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