Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

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thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
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NOOK FOR KIDS

I was looking over a childrens' book site and  I came across information about what is planned for kids, in the future, by Barnes and Noble. The Nook for them sounds very interesting, with all sorts of interactive options, but it made me wonder, if we immerse them so much in electronic devices, will they have any further need for social human interaction or will they become more and more introspective and anti-social? It seems like an interesting discussion for young moms and grandmoms.

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EscapistFL
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Re: NOOK FOR KIDS

 

Many parents are already allowing their children to play electronic devices for hours and hours which is very sad and at the risk of offending some, in my opinion, irresponsible. An "addiction" to reading on a Nook would not be good, but certainly better than the electronic games.

 

 

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luminessence
Posts: 89
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: NOOK FOR KIDS

Reading a paper book isn't any more social than reading on a Nook. Why would reading paper books be good for kids while reading on a Nook would be harmful?

Inspired Wordsmith
icebike
Posts: 4,434
Registered: ‎11-30-2009
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Re: NOOK FOR KIDS

If you substitute the word "Book" for "Nook" the post becomes kind of silly.  Nook simply changes the form of the book.  Not the content.  Not the purpose.  Not the enjoyment.

 

The objection then seems to become that kids are going to spend too much time reading.  While not impossible, its a risk most parents would be willing to take. 

 

Contributor
Scambugger
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎10-21-2010

Re: NOOK FOR KIDS

I let my 4 year old play Wii.  He watches TV.  That's enough electronic devices for him.  I want him to use DTBs as long as possible, just to have the experience of the feel and smell. 

 

I've seen kids who are always lost in books (electronic or not).  I don't think having an electronic book will cause any more "addiction" than using a DTB for escape.  I've also seen kids who couldn't sit still with a book if they tried.  Maybe the e-book will get some kids to read who otherwise think they "hate" it.  If a kid who hates to read has a cook e-gadget to use for reading, it might start a new love of reading. 

 

But whatever the case, I think it's important for parents to create balance across all the playing genres--electronics, outside games, alone, with friends, etc.  I try to make sure my son is exposed to many different things and people.  It's alot easier to just sit and let him play Wii all day than it is to play with him; but  no one ever said parenting would be easy.

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sirwillard
Posts: 496
Registered: ‎06-10-2010
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Re: NOOK FOR KIDS


thewanderingjew wrote:

I was looking over a childrens' book site and  I came across information about what is planned for kids, in the future, by Barnes and Noble. The Nook for them sounds very interesting, with all sorts of interactive options, but it made me wonder, if we immerse them so much in electronic devices, will they have any further need for social human interaction or will they become more and more introspective and anti-social? It seems like an interesting discussion for young moms and grandmoms.


Why is it an interesting discussion for young moms and grandmoms? What about old moms? What about dads? What about granddads?

 

Addiction to anything is bad. Electronics aren't any different here. A DTB is no different than an eBook, and both are probably a whole lot better for kids than a video game. That said, there's also plenty of evidence that moderate video game playing is something that can provide many benefits and could be considered "a good thing". I don't fear eBooks (or even electronic gaming) leading to anti-social behavior.

Check out my books on Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/profile/wekempf
Inspired Bibliophile
thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007

Re: NOOK FOR KIDS

 

I meant in regard to social interaction as in a library, for instance. Librarians have so much to impart, or used to, anyway. I can't imagine a library of nooks but maybe that is the way it will be someday. the card catalog is no longer a card catalog, newspapers are no longer stored, even The Oxford English Dictionary will no longer be published as a hard copy. Progress marches on.
Electronic devices are used mostly as babysitters, these days, and teaching tools. It may eliminate the need for a human being. Do you think people will lend their nooks to each other as they do books? Can you love your nook they way you loved a book? When I see certain books on a shelf, I get such a wonderful feeling. I don't get that with an e-device. I sometimes feel as if we are moving more and more to a world with less emotional attachments.
Also, a child can go to bed with a book and lovingly hold it. Somehow, although the picture might be interactive and more fun, I can't imagine a child loving a nook and taking it to bed because he loves the characters in the story or the pictures on the page or the fact that it is his/her very own. The emotional connection feels like it is missing.
That said, I don't think it would be harmful just more clinical, maybe.
luminessence wrote:

Reading a paper book isn't any more social than reading on a Nook. Why would reading paper books be good for kids while reading on a Nook would be harmful?


 

Doug_Pardee
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Re: NOOK FOR KIDS


thewanderingjew wrote:

 

Also, a child can go to bed with a book and lovingly hold it. Somehow, although the picture might be interactive and more fun, I can't imagine a child loving a nook and taking it to bed because he loves the characters in the story or the pictures on the page or the fact that it is his/her very own. The emotional connection feels like it is missing.


I certainly can't speak for children, but I'm far more likely to take my NOOK to bed to read than take a book. The NOOK is much easier to handle while lying down, and if I fall asleep while reading, it shuts itself off and automatically keeps track of the page I was on.

 

Inspired Wordsmith
Ozman69
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Registered: ‎04-24-2010
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Re: NOOK FOR KIDS

 


Doug_Pardee wrote:

thewanderingjew wrote:

 

Also, a child can go to bed with a book and lovingly hold it. Somehow, although the picture might be interactive and more fun, I can't imagine a child loving a nook and taking it to bed because he loves the characters in the story or the pictures on the page or the fact that it is his/her very own. The emotional connection feels like it is missing.


I certainly can't speak for children, but I'm far more likely to take my NOOK to bed to read than take a book. The NOOK is much easier to handle while lying down, and if I fall asleep while reading, it shuts itself off and automatically keeps track of the page I was on.

 


On a hardcover book, my drool served as a handy bookmark when I fell asleep while reading.  

 

The above is based upon my opinion... yours may vary!
Distinguished Scribe
Ya_Ya
Posts: 3,334
Registered: ‎09-29-2010
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Re: NOOK FOR KIDS

I don't think anyone is suggesting that NOOK or NOOKcolor replace regular books entirely, at least for children.

 

I'm not a Mom, but I have three nephews.  One is 4 (almost 5), one is 18 months and the third is 6 weeks old.  The 4-year-old and I play our own version of Scrabble, he loves books so much.  He would LOVE the NOOK.  The 18-month-old's most cherished toys are his books.  (Both of their mothers are teachers; one is an elementary school librarian the other teaches Montessori pre-K.)  

 

I imagine they would still have books they'd take to bed with them, that they'd know by cover and present to Uncle to read.  Uncle, who doesn't always get it and on more than one occasion has started to read the book, silently to himself.  The older one thinks he's joking and pokes him and they read together.  The little one just stands there looking puzzled.  :smileyvery-happy:

 

(Any wonder we're still childless?)

 

I haven't eliminated DTBs yet; I imagine I won't buy any that I haven't already read.  Sort of a NOOK it and those that I must have in paper, well, I'll buy a second time.  (I have Harry Potter in hard back, in softcover, and if I could have it on my NOOK, I would.)

 

I do understand what you are saying about libraries - but the libraries are doing everything they can to make themselves relevant; they'll probably still have children's storytimes, but maybe they'll be reading from NOOKs?

 

Inspired Correspondent
SuperC142
Posts: 76
Registered: ‎11-02-2009

Re: NOOK FOR KIDS


EscapistFL wrote:

 

Many parents are already allowing their children to play electronic devices for hours and hours which is very sad and at the risk of offending some, in my opinion, irresponsible. An "addiction" to reading on a Nook would not be good, but certainly better than the electronic games.

 

 


I'm sorry EscapistFL, but I disagree wholeheartedly.  As a parent, it's my job to prepare my child for life as an adult and I believe that shielding my child from modern technology would be the irresponsible course of action.  Being comfortable with technology is already essential to being successful in this world; can you imagine what it will be like 20 years from now?  I'm a devoted father that spends every free minute with my son and I intentionally expose him to all of the technology I can for exactly this reason.  That doesn't mean sending him off to his room to play with a gadget by himself; we play with these things together.  He is two and a half, has his own laptop (a netbook), his own portable media player (a Zune), etc.  I've written software to help him learn to use the laptop.  He's already comfortable with a keyboard and is learning to type, understands basic interface constructs (such as drag-and-drop, etc.) and is, already, generally comfortable with technology.  I also read to him constantly and also encourage him to try to read the books himself.  A device that encourages him to read while simultaneously exposing him to technology is a very good thing, in my opinion.

 

He has friends and plays well with other children.  Being comfortable with technology does not preclude having a rich social life.  Indeed, I'd say it enhances it, and that will become more true over the next two decades.

 

This isn't intended to be construed as an attack (please don't take it as one); I understand why you believe the things that you do.  I just fundamentally disagree and wanted to explain the other side of the argument.

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03FLHT2
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Re: NOOK FOR KIDS

SuperC142  I totally agree with your assessment.  I have a son who will be 6 in a month and he has had his own computer sense he was around two.   Unlike you though I am not of this generation and though I can get around a computer and most programs.  I have never learned any computer language.  It was in its infancy when I was in college   I feel it's highly important that he understand it and in fact relish it.  My son is also very out going, well he probably gets that from me.  He like me will walk up to most strangers in a group setting and say Hi I am Austin and start talking like he has known the kids forever.

Inspired Bibliophile
thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
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Re: NOOK FOR KIDS

 


sirwillard wrote:

thewanderingjew wrote:

I was looking over a childrens' book site and  I came across information about what is planned for kids, in the future, by Barnes and Noble. The Nook for them sounds very interesting, with all sorts of interactive options, but it made me wonder, if we immerse them so much in electronic devices, will they have any further need for social human interaction or will they become more and more introspective and anti-social? It seems like an interesting discussion for young moms and grandmoms.


Why is it an interesting discussion for young moms and grandmoms? What about old moms? What about dads? What about granddads?

 

TWJ WROTE: POINT WELL TAKEN, SORRY.

 

Addiction to anything is bad. Electronics aren't any different here. A DTB is no different than an eBook, and both are probably a whole lot better for kids than a video game. That said, there's also plenty of evidence that moderate video game playing is something that can provide many benefits and could be considered "a good thing". I don't fear eBooks (or even electronic gaming) leading to anti-social behavior.


 

Inspired Bibliophile
thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
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Re: NOOK FOR KIDS

 


Doug_Pardee wrote:

thewanderingjew wrote:

 

Also, a child can go to bed with a book and lovingly hold it. Somehow, although the picture might be interactive and more fun, I can't imagine a child loving a nook and taking it to bed because he loves the characters in the story or the pictures on the page or the fact that it is his/her very own. The emotional connection feels like it is missing.


I certainly can't speak for children, but I'm far more likely to take my NOOK to bed to read than take a book. The NOOK is much easier to handle while lying down, and if I fall asleep while reading, it shuts itself off and automatically keeps track of the page I was on.

 


That is a feature I was unaware of, but I don't often use my e-reader. I guess it depends on the age of the reader...I have to admit, I am a kid at heart but....the rest of me isn't!

 

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thewanderingjew
Posts: 2,247
Registered: ‎12-18-2007
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Re: NOOK FOR KIDS

I really wanted input and I thank you all for giving me some. I think there will always be bookshelves in my home, but I am a dinosaur. I am one of those who thought the cell phone wouldn't catch on!  :smileyvery-happy: Now I can't leave home without it...

 

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EscapistFL
Posts: 84
Registered: ‎06-26-2010
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Re: NOOK FOR KIDS

SuperC, we are actually in agreement!  My daughter has a DSi, I allow her to use one of our computers etc, however it is earned and timed.  I meant the parents that allow their children to spend hours and hours playing electronic games to the exclusion of sports, music, reading, playdates etc.

 

I did not take it as an attack. You are very respectful. I totally agree with what you said. I should have explained myself better. :smileyhappy:

Correspondent
lisat96
Posts: 194
Registered: ‎04-22-2010
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Re: NOOK FOR KIDS

 


Doug_Pardee wrote:
I certainly can't speak for children, but I'm far more likely to take my NOOK to bed to read than take a book. The NOOK is much easier to handle while lying down, and if I fall asleep while reading, it shuts itself off and automatically keeps track of the page I was on.

 


And you don't roll over on the nook and end up with bent pages or a torn cover.

 

Reader 4
clmullins
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎08-10-2010

Re: NOOK FOR KIDS

Yes it's important for our young kids to learn about technology but where is the line drawn between way too young and the right age. My 4 year old does not have his own electrons, call me cheap but I would rather teach him how to care for his stuff with a $4 pack of matchbox cars then with a $400 netbook or a $250 nook. You can argue that he or she can take care of it but ultimately who takes care of the electronics, mum and dad do not the child. We end up doing everything for them. So you then may say they can do it themselves well let me ask you this then at age 4 or age 2 or age 6 they BREAK a $400 piece of equipment are you going to run out the door right then and drop the cash for a new one, if you can do that then hey let me be your kid but not all of us can do that.

Let them learn the technology but don't treat it as a birth right and think that hey at the age of 6 months let get the kid a nook color, or a netbook, or a cell phone. Get the gadgets once they prove they are responsible enough to care for them and not break them within a few months, and can make it last a few years without mum and dad stepping in to take care of it.

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TXAnnie
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Registered: ‎02-24-2010
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Re: NOOK FOR KIDS

[ Edited ]

As a parent who passed her love of books on to her daughters before ereaders were a fact of life and a kinder teacher, I really would like to see children exposed to books where they can turn pages back and forth, drag them to any room of the house or take them to school, and have several open and surrounding them at one time.  

 

Yes my five/six year old students do have access to computers in my classroom, but reading books with a stuffed animal (reading buddy) and one or two children in a group is exciting and fun.

 

I can see buying favorite books for your two year old children and sharing with them on your own color nook.  But buying a color nook for a child younger than 8 or 9 seems a little much in my humble opinion.  Let them have fun with their books, get carried away with enjoying them, not having to be careful because they have an expensive electronic device in front of them.

 

I see children growing up way too fast in so many ways, let kids be kids.  Expose them to electronics then give them time to explore with blocks, empty boxes, parks, etc.

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JMMoore
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Registered: ‎02-21-2011
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Re: NOOK FOR KIDS

I just got my Nook for Christmas (My husband is tired of tripping over all of my other books) and every night my 3 year old and I sit and read a story on the Nook she loves it and the pages don't tear! She often wants me to get it out and read, she also has over 50 other childrens books in a state of disarray, a book should be read and hers are already thouroughly thumbed through. The Nook lets her pick hndreds of books and being 50 miles away from a B&N it's not always easy to get there. It's easy to travel with and in the car she would rather the Nook read to her than watch a movie or play games. So with all of the pros and cons that people have, wouldn't you rather have a child read and explore their imaginations. It doesn't matter how they read it just matters that they read.