Reply
Frequent Contributor
goldenstatewriter
Posts: 65
Registered: ‎03-27-2012
0 Kudos

Amazon on a new censorship kick

Well after an article in a UK newspaper where some reporter complained about how you can by books about taboo sex subject online, Amazon is on a kick to start censoring erotica again.

 

Problem is, they haven't warned anyone, and they're being very random about it. Books that have been okay for years are suddenly finding themselves targeted. I don't know if B&N is going to fall prey to the same stupidity, only time will tell.

 

But it doesn't mean a lot of people are going to start going elsewhere for their Erotica, so sales here may see an increase if B&N doesn't cave into the demands of a lone prude reporter.

Frequent Contributor
AEplus
Posts: 27
Registered: ‎07-19-2012
0 Kudos

Re: Amazon on a new censorship kick

You should see what Kobo did. Yesterday around midnight they just pulled all erotica off their library. I only know this because they sent an email to everyone saying how they are going to look at each book to make sure it doesn't violate their terms of service.

 

The reports I see for B&N is that they are considering removing some erotica. I'm against censorship in general because that I believe in choice and that if you don't like it then don't buy it or look at it.

 

If all the major distributor censor you can expect other places to sell it to pop up and make a killing from what other places are unwilling to sell.

Frequent Contributor
goldenstatewriter
Posts: 65
Registered: ‎03-27-2012
0 Kudos

Re: Amazon on a new censorship kick

actually kobo didn't pull ALL erotica off the shelves. There are some authors who are still there. From what I gather they only pulled INDIE authors off the shelves. If you have a publishing company, you're safe.

Contributor
sdsmith64
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎08-14-2013
0 Kudos

Re: Amazon on a new censorship kick

can we get the ACLU involved with the whole banning erotica on Kindle thing? this is from the ACLU web site:

"The ACLU's vision of an uncensored Internet was clearly shared by the U.S. Supreme Court when it declared, in Reno v. ACLU, the Internet to be a free speech zone, deserving at least as much First Amendment protection as that afforded to books, newspapers and magazines. The government, the court said, can no more restrict a person's access to words or images on the Internet than it could be allowed to snatch a book out of a reader's hands in the library, or cover over a statue of a nude in a museum."

https://www.aclu.org/free-speech/internet-censorship

Frequent Contributor
TomRichardson
Posts: 69
Registered: ‎03-06-2013
0 Kudos

Re: Amazon on a new censorship kick

IANAL, but private organizations may do (and often do) things that are expressly forbidden to the USA, state, and local governments by the Constitution. What Amazon and Kobo have done is s***ty, but it's legal.
Bibliophile
bklvr896
Posts: 4,802
Registered: ‎12-31-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Amazon on a new censorship kick


sdsmith64 wrote:

can we get the ACLU involved with the whole banning erotica on Kindle thing? this is from the ACLU web site:

"The ACLU's vision of an uncensored Internet was clearly shared by the U.S. Supreme Court when it declared, in Reno v. ACLU, the Internet to be a free speech zone, deserving at least as much First Amendment protection as that afforded to books, newspapers and magazines. The government, the court said, can no more restrict a person's access to words or images on the Internet than it could be allowed to snatch a book out of a reader's hands in the library, or cover over a statue of a nude in a museum."

https://www.aclu.org/free-speech/internet-censorship


You can put your erotica on the Internet, you just can't do it on Amazon's site.  A retailer is free to sell or not sell whatever it wants.  Amazon is not the government.

Frequent Contributor
goldenstatewriter
Posts: 65
Registered: ‎03-27-2012
0 Kudos

Re: Amazon on a new censorship kick

Actually Tom, there are still rules that apply in this case. Amazon and Kobo can pull and censor books, but ONLY if they apply the same rules across the board to all vendors. If they start showing one (or more) vendors preferential treatment over others, then (at least in America) that is against the law. Don't know about overseas however.