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Thriller-Writer
Posts: 28
Registered: ‎01-05-2013
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Some book submission questions

[ Edited ]

Looking at some articles about DRM encryption and I'm on the fence about it. Some people say it helps, others say it hinders readers. Thoughts?

 

I've heard that technically since I'm the original creator of my book, that I automatically hold a copyright. Is this true? And if it is, how does it impact my rights as to where it can be sold?

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Mrs-Smith
Posts: 783
Registered: ‎08-12-2010
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Re: Some book submission questions

Yeah, it's pretty much a personal decision. As soon as you write your book, it belongs to you. As soon as you publish it, you then hold the copyrights. You can sell your book anywhere they allow Indies to publish. If you like, you can file copyright, but again, that's a personal decision.

 

 

Hope this helps :smileyhappy:

 

 

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Thriller-Writer
Posts: 28
Registered: ‎01-05-2013
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Re: Some book submission questions

You have been as helpful as anyone could be. I appreciate all the answers you've given me throughout this process.

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eB00k
Posts: 63
Registered: ‎12-09-2012
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Re: Some book submission questions

[ Edited ]

Hi Thriller-Writer,

 

Respectfully, I think you have an incomplete picture. DRM may be easy for a skilled hacker to crack but that doesn't mean it isn't important. It depends on what kind of protection you want. If you want legal protection, then you should probably use it.

 

For example, you do not need to file an official copyright to own the copyright to your work. But if you ever go to court to seek damages from the thief who has profited greatly from the theft of your work, you will discover that not filing the copyright reduces the award you can receive from the judicial system.

 

In similar fashion, not employing reasonable measures to protect your work (such as DRM encryption) may greatly reduce your ability to win damages from the thief.

 

Questions like this one are seldom answered accurately in a forum like this. If you have intellectual property that is important to protect, go talk to an intellectual property lawyer. An initial consultation may be free.

 

Kind regards, David

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GLPub
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎03-16-2013
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Re: Some book submission questions

Always DRM everything you can as well as copyright and if it has images watermark those also and make sure  they are also copywritten.

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EinsteinPD
Posts: 235
Registered: ‎05-08-2012
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Re: Some book submission questions

Publish with clearly displayed and stated notice of copyright, if not the book becomes part of the Public Domain, and you lose all rights.

 

"Copyright (c) 2013 Phillip Duke all rights reserved. Reproduction prohibited without the author's permission in writing."

 

I publish with two copyright notices- one just below the Title and author, the other with the "Front Material" in the back. Smashwords.com has detailed copyright instructions.

 

Most Indies do not have to be concerned about copyright, because their books are never popular enough to pirate. But you should copyright anyway, it's your right to protect your intellectual property.

 

JTR-SH cover.jpg

Cover image is an authentic Jack the Ripper victim crime scene photograph.

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TSCerys
Posts: 101
Registered: ‎12-25-2010
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Re: Some book submission questions

You don't need to put a copyright notice on anything, though it's recommended.  The only real reason to put copyright notice is so that you can attempt to prove "willful infringement" if someone blatantly steals your work.  If there was no copyright notice, they might believe that it's in the public domain.

 

Just because you don't put a copyright notice doesn't mean it's not copywritten, though.  As soon as you write something unique, it now has a copyright on it, whether you state such or not.  Just because you don't put a copyright notice on it doesn't mean it randomly becomes public domain after that.  The only way it would become public domain is if you, for whatever reason, make it openly available.  Typically you'd use a Creative Commons license for that, or whatever, but I guess you could just state it's in the public domain, too, if that's what you wanted to do.

 

Anyways, this is old and I don't know why people wanted to discuss it again and bring it back up to the top of the forums, but oh well.  I don't DRM anything because the people who want to pirate my stuff are just going to break the DRM anyways.  DRM is annoying to real customers and it doesn't really provide you with any useful anything.  I'd recommend everyone put a copyright notice on their stuff because it's fairly standard and it makes it easier to prove willful infringment if you ever have to deal with that, but technically you don't have to put a copyright notice on to still retain the copyright for it.  

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Tm-Moore
Posts: 58
Registered: ‎09-12-2008
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Re: Some book submission questions

Any professional publisher produces a copyright statement regardless of the format. You can't trust that anyone will honor your rights to the work unless you publish said rights clearly and formally on the top level of the text.

 

I do not bother with DRM.

 

I figured out something new, however, which may fix some of the problems I had been experiencing with access to the file once a download is sold. It may help those who still use Word as a base file.

1)All margins must be set to "0" to accommodate the margin setting of the ePub converter. No header or footer. Section="continuous", section breaks only when needed, otherwise I just use one section.

2)Fancy fonts, etc. must be replaced with a picture, and the basic text setting is Times New Roman no matter what.

3)The file must be clear of tabs, tables and other extraneous features. Alignment="left", indents at "0", first line indent=".25"; set this as "default" for the entire document, "this document only".

4) Do NOT save the file as "read only".

 

I can make ePubs but even if they pass validation, sometime they get rejected anyway. Ah, well.

Theresa M. Moore
Author of the Children of The Dragon vampire series and other fiction/nonfiction books http://www.antellus.com/