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Frequent Contributor
abrahamm
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎02-20-2013

Can Your Nook Levitate?

Of course not, but I see many wanting theirs to do things it wasn't designed to do.

 

Am I alone in being content that it does a marvelous of job of doing what it was designed to do?

 

Yes, I'm cranky as I'm recovering from surgery and can't work out or bike or even pick up any one of our three cats.

 

I've got cabin fever.

 

I'm whining...anyway, I do see a lot of folks wanting their Nook to cook breakfast or retrieve the mail or any number of things it wasn't designed to perform - what's up with that?

 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
keriflur
Posts: 6,552
Registered: ‎01-05-2010
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Re: Can Your Nook Levitate?

I like you.  :smileyhappy:

 

You should come on over to the Community board and join in on the discussion there.

Frequent Contributor
abrahamm
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎02-20-2013
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Re: Can Your Nook Levitate?

Keriflur,

 

Thanks!

 

My curmudgeonly attitude is shifting...yep, there it is - a smile is bursting upon my craggy face!

 

Of course, with the aid of your kindness and two shots of tequila, I feel much improved.

Frequent Contributor
abrahamm
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎02-20-2013
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Re: Can Your Nook Levitate?

I'm hopelessly ill equipped to know specifically where to go within the Community to join in the discussion... so please, HELP I need navigating specifics... were it not for my wife (Sr. Systems Analyst - Aero Space -  yes, I'm bragging about her) I wouldn't own anything technical.

 

Some of my favorite tools: 2 different types of axes /  3 different weighted sledge hammers, 5 steel wedges and a partidge...well, no partidges. I like to split firewood. Yes, I'm a cave person.

 

We live in rural Texas on an acre and a half of land, populated with coyotes, bobcats, skunks, possums, raccoons and sigh, a few venomous snakes. Of course, they don't all show up at the same time...they're polite enough to make random appearances. Oh and lest I forget, feral hogs which I shoot from my back porch, but only do so if the larder is getting bare. And man, are they tasty, but something of a chore to dress out. It's pretty disgusting, but if you're a carnivore, you do what needs doing...

 

Can I blather or what?

 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
keriflur
Posts: 6,552
Registered: ‎01-05-2010
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Re: Can Your Nook Levitate?

Here's a link to the Community Board:

http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/Community-Room/bd-p/CR

 

To get to all the boards, go here:

http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com

 

I could never in a million years clean and butcher a hog, but it does sound tasty. :smileyhappy:

Distinguished Bibliophile
Mercury_Glitch
Posts: 1,380
Registered: ‎06-07-2011

Re: Can Your Nook Levitate?

See, the NST/G are capable of quite a bit more than what B&N allows you to do.  So I do side slightly with those who enable their Nooks to do more and are then content.  However, you're quite right that there are those out there who expect the Nook to do things that no one has ever claimed it would do, nor that it even could do. 

 

I blame the entitlement phenomenon that has been sweeping the consumer public for the past years. 

The Wheel weaves as the Wheel wills, and we are only the thread of the Pattern.
Distinguished Bibliophile
bobstro
Posts: 3,720
Registered: ‎01-01-2012

If my NOOK can levitate, why shouldn't I let it?

[ Edited ]

The phenomenon is nothing new. People have always tried to get more out of whatever they buy. I'm pretty sure the original manufacturers didn't intend for their products to be modified like this:

 

Unauthorized Consumer Modifications

Unauthorized Product Use 2

 

There's an entire market based on aftermarket modifications for cars and trucks. It's their stuff, you see. Do you only use original manufacturer parts on your car or truck?

 

The difference is that the new consumer products are making such "hot rodding" more accessible, and without the need for a toolbox and getting grease under one's fingernails.

 

I make a distinction between those who buy into marketing hype only to be disappointed by reality, and those who like to get under the hood and tinker.

 

I know when I modify my devices that the manufacturer is no longer responsible for fixing it. If you read up on the rooting and alternate firmware development threads at XDA, each one starts with something like "By doing this, you void all device warranties". The problem comes when those who have no competence or understanding decide they can play with the big boys and manage to screw up their device. Here again, nothing new:

 

Consequences

More Consequences

 

At least with consumer electronics, the odds of being killed or hurting others is much smaller.

Inspired Scribe
kamas716
Posts: 1,467
Registered: ‎09-28-2011
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Re: If my NOOK can levitate, why shouldn't I let it?

Bobstro, I love the vehicle analogy. I liken the people who buy a reading optimized device and complain that it doesn't do this or that for them to the guy who buys a Chevy Luv truck and then complains that it won't carry a ton and a half of wood or carry 12 people. You need to buy the device that fits your needs, not the cheapest device and expect it to do everything you want without doing some heavy modification.
http://www.goodreads.com/kamas716
Distinguished Bibliophile
bobstro
Posts: 3,720
Registered: ‎01-01-2012
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Re: If my NOOK can levitate, why shouldn't I let it?

[ Edited ]

kamas716 wrote:
[...] I liken the people who buy a reading optimized device and complain that it doesn't do this or that for them to the guy who buys a Chevy Luv truck and then complains that it won't carry a ton and a half of wood or carry 12 people.

 

Some are just plain goofy, to be sure. There are some folks apparently convinced they can make their NST into an iPad-beating tablet. I put those in the same category as the teen who slathers his car in stickers and bolt-on accessories, convinced it'll go faster.

 

Stickers Don't Cut It

 

There's another category, though, that realizes their devices can do much, much more than was originally intended. Generally, these types are OK with the idea that doing so voids their warranty. Again, check out the warnings on XDA. I liken these more to the type that'll make a few mods to their car to improve performance or mileage, or just keep it running an extra decade or two.

 

The problem is when the first group tries to emulate the second.

 

There is a difference between complaining about the device, and suggesting that B&N quit trying to prevent users from doing what they want with the device. I personally resent planned obsolescence, and hope to get many extra years out of any device I buy, even if it's not "current" per the manufacturer. Lock down makes this much more difficult. It would be a shame for my NST or NC to wind up in a land fill simply because B&N has newer products out. I'd be perfectly happy if B&N provided a "check here to void all warranties" option to bypass the lock down, thus absolving them of any responsibility while allowing me to tinker as I wish. Of course, that might "deprive" them of sales, so they aren't likely to do this.

 

One area I think B&N should pay attention to is that of low-hanging fruit type improvements to the device. Some of the mods are for basic things such as allowing the user to control when updates are accepted, turning off "swipe here" lock screen bars and other common-sense, easy-to-implement improvements. I personally like to sync my device to local time when I travel. I like to have more control over when wireless is turned on to save battery. I want to be able to deal with any wifi captive portal, not just some. I really want to be able to back up my device regularly. These are hardly outrageous demands. More like asking for improvements to that Luv so it'll work better for its intended use.

 

Then there's the whole issue of B&N taking away funcitonality. On my poor little NST, one day my Discover and Popular Science subscriptions quit working with B&N's reader, yet I can read those same epubs with a 3rd party reader. Others experienced page numbers no longer working in the ToC. One day, without warning, the bed of my Chevy Luv is 2 feet shorter. So now we have to modify our devices to preserve functionality that was there when we bought them. 

 

This isn't a rant or an attack on anybody. These are just my opinions. I hope everybody is happy with their devices and getting as much out of them as they want.

Inspired Scribe
kamas716
Posts: 1,467
Registered: ‎09-28-2011
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Re: If my NOOK can levitate, why shouldn't I let it?


bobstro wrote:

One area I think B&N should pay attention to is that of low-hanging fruit type improvements to the device. Some of the mods are for basic things such as allowing the user to control when updates are accepted, turning off "swipe here" lock screen bars and other common-sense, easy-to-implement improvements. I personally like to sync my device to local time when I travel. I like to have more control over when wireless is turned on to save battery. I want to be able to deal with any wifi captive portal, not just some. I really want to be able to back up my device regularly. These are hardly outrageous demands. More like asking for improvements to that Luv so it'll work better for its intended use.

 

Then there's the whole issue of B&N taking away funcitonality. On my poor little NST, one day my Discover and Popular Science subscriptions quit working with B&N's reader, yet I can read those same epubs with a 3rd party reader. Others experienced page numbers no longer working in the ToC. One day, without warning, the bed of my Chevy Luv is 2 feet shorter. So now we have to modify our devices to preserve functionality that was there when we bought them. 

 

This isn't a rant or an attack on anybody. These are just my opinions. I hope everybody is happy with their devices and getting as much out of them as they want.


Yeah, I pretty much agree with everything you said here, and think it would be very beneficial in terms of sales.

http://www.goodreads.com/kamas716