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Distinguished Bibliophile
roustabout
Posts: 3,571
Registered: ‎03-31-2011

Re: Difference between the Nook Color, Nook Tablet, and Nook HD?

[ Edited ]

Me three.  I root, I teach others to root, I criticize BN's PHB types when they're being stupid or lying to their customers - but I subscribe to magazines from BN, I've shifted plenty of devices from them and I've probably kept a number of folks from returning their devices by teaching them to fix or improve them.  

 

Wiht the nook color, I was a fairly endless pest about landscape reading, and was walking folks through the rooting process and installing and setting up Aldiko over the phone - not to nick customers away from BN, but because Aldiko played well with BN's DRM scheme and supported landscape mode reading.  

"no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution.
flyingtoastr
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Re: Difference between the Nook Color, Nook Tablet, and Nook HD?

But, again, what's pretty much the first thing people here say when they talk about rooting?

 

"I can install the Kindle app."

 

BN (rightly) has no interest in making it easy to subsidize their main competitor's store. You may not personally use it, but don't pretend that it isn't the single most cited reason on these forums to mess with a device.

 

Likewise, the Play Store is a direct competitor as well - given that they have moved into BN's main content sales channels (books and periodicals).

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bobstro
Posts: 3,521
Registered: ‎01-01-2012

Re: Difference between the Nook Color, Nook Tablet, and Nook HD?

Think about that for a minute, FT. That question should be music to your (B&N), ears. That's the sound of an Amazon customer trying to transition over to a B&N content-centric device. They're just not willing to throw away an existing investment. You're essentially saying that converts are not welcome. Is that good business?
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5ivedom
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Re: Difference between the Nook Color, Nook Tablet, and Nook HD?

Bobstro, that might be the case half the time. The other half it's someone wanting to use a B&N subsidized device to buy Kindle books.

 

Since Amazon takes more losses on book loss leaders it's very risky for B&N to allow this.

 

If they could come up with some way to allow converts and then not allow them new purchases from Amazon that would be interesting.

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keriflur
Posts: 6,169
Registered: ‎01-05-2010

Re: Difference between the Nook Color, Nook Tablet, and Nook HD?


5ivedom wrote:

Bobstro, that might be the case half the time. The other half it's someone wanting to use a B&N subsidized device to buy Kindle books.

 

Since Amazon takes more losses on book loss leaders it's very risky for B&N to allow this.

 

If they could come up with some way to allow converts and then not allow them new purchases from Amazon that would be interesting.


Here's the thing about loss leaders - they only work if the overall purchases from the customer create a profit.  If all I buy from Amazon are loss leaders, and they never "lead" to other purchases, Amazon loses money on me.  So, why does it hurt B&N for me to buy loss leaders from Amazon?  It doesn't.  In fact, it hurts Amazon.

 

The key to winning over customers in a competitive market isn't just price, it's price plus user experience and perception.  If B&N can provide a better user experience (ease of shopping, ease of use of the devices, features, intuitive and functional UI on the devices and the website, good customer service, etc.), then it won't matter if customers have the option to shop elsewhere, as they won't want to.

DeanGibson
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Re: Difference between the Nook Color, Nook Tablet, and Nook HD?

[ Edited ]

5ivedom wrote:

Bobstro, that might be the case half the time. The other half it's someone wanting to use a B&N subsidized device to buy Kindle books.

 

Since Amazon takes more losses on book loss leaders it's very risky for B&N to allow this.

 

If they could come up with some way to allow converts and then not allow them new purchases from Amazon that would be interesting.


The problem is, most people are not fools when it comes to money, and for those that are, they usually have friends that are not.  When you restrict users, if they find a suitable alternative, they will go there.  If that means a competitor's device, well then, that means your potential customer is spending most of his/her time at the competitor's store/web site, rather than at yours.

 

When the Nook Color was released, there was no suitable (read: economical) alternative, and even if B&N wasn't making much (or any) profit from the sales of Nook Colors to tablet-oriented users, it was the economic uniqueness of the Nook Color that put B&N on the map.  Here is an old WSJ article from the period (March 2011):

 

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703662804576188901890884360.html?KEYWORDS=nook+color

 

Many companies (Amazon included) take small losses in certain sales in order to build up market share.  Having done this with the Nook Color, it's a shame that B&N didn't continue it.  I understand their reasons, even sympathize with them to a certain extent.  The problem is, B&N has lost a lot of customer loyalty from the Nook's early adopters.  While the "walled garden" is part of that, it's not the whole story.

 

An interesting metric would be to know the percentagle of resales of Nooks vs Kindles, as measured, say, by eBay and/or Craigslist listings.

2 Nook HD/8GB + 2 Nook HD+/16GB: B&N 2.2.0 rooted
2 Nook Touch (one Ltd. Ed.): B&N 1.2.1 rooted; Dell Venue 8 Pro: Windows 8.1
2 Nook 1stEd/3G: B&N 1.7.0 rooted.; Acer Iconia A500: Android 4.0.3 rooted;
Nook Color: B&N 1.4.3 rooted; Samsung Galaxy Tab2 (7.0"): Android 4.2.2 rooted
Customer loyalty is earned, not commanded or deserved, and easily lost.
Never suspect intent where incompetence will do.
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bobstro
Posts: 3,521
Registered: ‎01-01-2012

Have some faith in your products, B&N!

[ Edited ]

Another factor B&N should consider: The Kindle app pales in comparison to the B&N reader, imperfect as it is. The Kindle app is great marketing for B&N's readers. Take a completely random and hypothetical customer (me) who is looking at a device for the first time. I've bought 2-3 Kindle books to read on my smartphone, because, hell, ebooks are Kindle, right? I go into the store and I pick up a NOOK and marvel at how much better the reading experience is (I did). I ask if I can either convert my existing Kindle books or load the Kindle Android app. We all know conversion is imposssible (from B&N's perspective), so one of two things happen:

 

1. Yes, I can load the Kindle app and walk out with a device that's going to put B&N content front and center on my device. The Kindle app is there so I can still read my three books, but man, it really sucks. I'll just buy from books B&N from now on. Oh, I can share B&N ebooks with my wife? Better buy her the nicer NOOK for Christmas. Oooh, it does video too? Wow, the NOOK versions of these apps sure work better. Now maybe I'll start buying from B&N.

 

or

 

2. FT slaps the device out of my hands and tells me what a dirty Amazon customer I am and throws me out of his store. I go across the street and buy a Kindle and never buy content from B&N.

 

OK, that's a bit of a dramatic example, but isn't that effectively what FT's stance results in?

 

(In reality, there's option 3 in which I know that I can root and do what I want, but y'all are telling me what a small portion of the market I represent, and how bad a customer I am despite spending over $600 per year with B&N since acquiring my first NC, so we'll just pretend that option doesn't exist.)

 

As to B&N subsidizing the NOOKS: Last I read, admittedly on the NT, B&N is making a profit, albeit a small one, on each device. Even if the user never buys another bit of B&N content, they haven't lost anything selling a NOOK to them. (If B&N were truly subsidizing the device, they'd be smart to do it along with a contract, just like the cellular carriers do.)

 

Even if only half the users who buy a NOOK to read Kindle books convert, that's more than B&N has now, and is eating directly at the base of Amazon's juggernaut. One half of this market is better than the none B&N gets now, no?

 

Essentially what I'm saying is that B&N should have more confidence in their ability to deliver a superior product with a superior reading experience on their device (they do), and quit counting on trapping users into a closed market (they can't). Provide the more compelling reader, the more compelling device and the more compelling ecosystem and users will become loyal even in the face of options. Make us feel that B&N is where we want to be, not where we're stuck because we got a NOOK for Christmas and not an iPad.

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5ivedom
Posts: 3,544
Registered: ‎12-03-2011

Re: Have some faith in your products, B&N!

Well, this is risky:

 

*****

Essentially what I'm saying is that B&N should have more confidence in their ability to deliver a superior product with a superior reading experience on their device (they do), and quit counting on trapping users into a closed market (they can't).

*****

 

You're basically saying B&N has a choice -

 

1) Have 100% sales from people who are OK with the closed ecosystem.

OR

 

2) Have X% sales from ALL people on the device.

 

*****

 

So, in first case let's say they sell 5 million. IN second case they sell 10 million.

 

Will 100% sales from 5 million people be better than

 

X% sales from 10 million.

 

*****

Here's what I've found in general from customers who ask for openness (not saying it applies to you, not saying it's scientific) -

 

Then tend to spend less and want more.

 

*****

Basically, there's a very strong movement towards 'Free Digital Content' online.

And Google represents that to an extent.

 

So the people most likely to want 'open ecosystems' are the most likely to not pay for ebooks.

 

*****

OK, you and 5% of people might be the exceptions.

 

However, 95% of people who want openness and no closed ecosystem are not good customers for a BUSINESS.

 

Your argument, for the business, is akin to a Horse telling the ranch owner

 

Open up the doors. I'll take a stroll once in a while but I'll always be back.

 

The ranch owner trusts you but he doesn't trust -

 

1) That the other horses won't run away.

2) That wolves or mountain lions won't sneak in.

3) That something else won't go wrong.

 

*****

 

All the examples you could point out of 'open' systems working really well only happens on very very big scales.

 

Perhaps B&N doesn't want to be like Wikipedia where every year they have to get out their 'Please Donate' banners.

Perhaps it wants to be super profitable like Apple.

 

Perhaps it doesn't want to be like Android. For Google Android is just a defence. So this entire idea of openness it's selling is just to PREVENT someone else from attacking search.

 

If you don't already have a very lucrative revenue stream like Search, then it makes no sense to make what could be Your Very Lucrative Revenue Stream 'open and vulnerable'.

 

*****

Problem is that very, very, very few people actually do what you are suggesting they will do.

 

They will almost always pick the cheapest ebook source. So why would B&N cater to people like that when it get can get customers who are happy to buy from ONLY B&N.

 

*****

It's about defensibility.

 

B&N knows Amazon can keep taking losses just to let it go bankrupt. So leaving Nooks open would be madness.

flyingtoastr
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Re: Have some faith in your products, B&N!

I do find it more than a little insulting that you would insinuate that I would act like that to a customer.

 

And my stance, as I've posted as nauseum, is that I don't give a flying crap what people do to their devices, so long as they don't come whining to me when they screw something up and demand a replacement. You break the EULA, you lose your warranty. That's all it is to me. If that's a trade-off you're willing to make, then by all means do whatever you want to the darn thing.

 

All I've ever posted is that I can understand the business reasons why BN (and any company) would want content lock-in, especially on null margin devices.

 

But it's just a lot easier to make me into a strawman for your righteous tirade, right?

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bobstro
Posts: 3,521
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Re: Have some faith in your products, B&N!

[ Edited ]

5ivedom wrote:

[...] You're basically saying B&N has a choice -

 

1) Have 100% sales from people who are OK with the closed ecosystem.

 

OR

 

2) Have X% sales from ALL people on the device.


The people in the first category don't go away. They'd have 100% of sales from people who are OK with the closed ecosystem AND X% sales from all other people on the device. They are not mutually exclusive. They are different demographics.


So, in first case let's say they sell 5 million. IN second case they sell 10 million.

 

Will 100% sales from 5 million people be better than

 

X% sales from 10 million.


The 5 million do not go away. B&N is potentially expanding their market beyond that existing 5 million base. By exactly how much, we can't say, but a lot of people do have extensive collections of media from Amazon. If the additional growth comes at Amazon's expense, I would think that's a gain for B&N. Unless such users see some sort of transition, how else will you convince them to switch?

 

FT's assertion was that those who want other app sources want, in most cases, the Kindle app. I'm suggesting that is perfectly understandable if they have an existing content collection, but that B&N provides a reading experience that is far better than that much-feared Kindle app. Would you still want an ebook for $0.50 less if reading it is a lousy experience on your device (which is, after all, a NOOK)?


[...] Here's what I've found in general from customers who ask for openness (not saying it applies to you, not saying it's scientific) -


I'm not so much advocating for "complete openness" as suggesting they quit making fighting customer desires for additional non-B&N apps priority one. Provide an option for those willing to accept terms that limit B&N's liability (per FT's comment) in a way that is readily verifiable by both parties. Heck, most devices come with "Warranty void if sticker removed" slathered all over the case. Do this with software.

 

B&N is going into year 3 now with a reputation for a limited, if not poor, app selection. (Don't take my word for it. Read the reviews comparing the NOOK to Kindle.) This situation clearly isn't changing anytime soon.


Then tend to spend less and want more.


You need to separate people who want a more open device to run a few, likely paid, apps from the millions, often kids, who will download a game and spend 10 minutes on it before moving on. Those millions aren't lost sales. They're not real potential customers.


[...] Basically, there's a very strong movement towards 'Free Digital Content' online.

And Google represents that to an extent.


I'm not suggesting that B&N give anything away for free. The closest we've discussed in this thread is the ability for an existing Amazon customer to load the Kindle app onto a NOOK they might buy.


[...] However, 95% of people who want openness and no closed ecosystem are not good customers for a BUSINESS.


Not sure how you got to giving stuff away from my suggestion that having the Kindle app on a NOOK might be good for B&N. I think you're adding "Open Source" to this discussion. A closed ecosystem is not the opposite of open source.

 

Again, 5ivedom, why do you associate rooting with being a bad customer?


All the examples you could point out of 'open' systems working really well only happens on very very big scales.


OK, now I'm confused. Are you confusing me with someone else? I'm asking to be able to add a very few 3rd party apps to my purchased and paid for NOOK, alongside my several hundred dollars worth of purchased NOOK content so, amongh other things, I can preserve my existing investment in purchased Amazon content. How am I now asking for anything for free?

 

Asking for opening access to additional sources for apps is not asking that all apps and content be free!


[...] They will almost always pick the cheapest ebook source. So why would B&N cater to people like that when it get can get customers who are happy to buy from ONLY B&N.


So you're conceding that B&N will never be the cheapest source at the outset? What if the content is identically priced? The better experience, the better ecosystem will be the draw. This is Apple's appeal, after all.


B&N knows Amazon can keep taking losses just to let it go bankrupt. So leaving Nooks open would be madness.


I'd counter that making selling a device to a potential customer contingent upon their abandoning their existing purchases is equally madness. In what other world would such an idea work? Will B&N not sell me paper books because I might buy other books somewhere else?

 

Again, 5ivedom, you seem to think that rooting or loading a non-B&N app makes an individual into a bad customer. I do not see how you come to that conclusion.

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bobstro
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Re: Have some faith in your products, B&N!

[ Edited ]

flyingtoastr wrote:

I do find it more than a little insulting that you would insinuate that I would act like that to a customer.


As I wrote, dramatic. You didn't do that any more than I bricked a NOOK and tried to trick B&N into taking it back.


[...] And my stance, as I've posted as nauseum, is that I don't give a flying crap what people do to their devices, so long as they don't come whining to me when they screw something up and demand a replacement. You break the EULA, you lose your warranty. That's all it is to me. If that's a trade-off you're willing to make, then by all means do whatever you want to the darn thing.


If you'll read my previous post in this thread, I think we both view that issue (which is not the one currently under discussion) the same way. But yes, we're now aware of your stance on THAT issue.

 

The specific question I've asked in this thread is why 5ivedom thinks rooters are somehow bad customers. You suggested that it was because they might load the Kindle app. I don't think that automatically makes them into customers whose money B&N shouldn't want.


[...] But it's just a lot easier to make me into a strawman for your righteous tirade, right?


Ah, but on you it looks good, right?

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BFCoughlin
Posts: 649
Registered: ‎03-08-2011

Re: Have some faith in your products, B&N!

This line of reasoning makes a lot of sense to me.  At present, opting for either the Nook or the Kindle locks one intyo that system unless one is willing to lose the investment one made in books already.  I have a firend who was given a Kindle Fire for Christmas.  She likes it as a browser but finds it too heavy for reading.  She loves my Nook Simple Touch.  She'd buy one, but then she couldn't read all the books she already has on her KF.  My mom bought a Kindle and lost it.  She, too, really likes my NST, and would have replaced the lost Kindle with one if it didn't mean losing access to the books that were on the Kindle. If they were able to read those books on their new Nooks, they'd probably go one to buy their future books from B&N. 

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patgolfneb
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Re: Have some faith in your products, B&N!

I feel BN's business model isn't the real issue, because this is really a response by the smaller competitor trying to protect itself from a couple of near monopoly firms.

 

Amazons insistence on a proprietary eBook format is telling. If Apple created an ap3 music format, and everyone else used mp3, with the restrictions similar to Amazons, plus drm, the outcry would be overwhelming. Instead of attacking BN the real focus should be on Amazon adopting an industry wide epub format and refraining from predatory pricing.

Google is attempting to parlay their search engine dominance and more recently attempting to exert more control over android by denying features unless stock android or restrictive packages are chosen, that it is willing to trod the path Microsoft trod, until courts intervened, in the past. Google play is trying to sell not only apps, but music, movies etc. 

 

If BN is to recoup device development costs and not be price cut out of existence by Amazon and Google it cannot cede revenue streams like apps to competitors. In the long run revenues from as many streams are necessary. Having credible content in apps and movies, enough to satisfy 80 percent of its target customers not be play clone is probably the goal. Criticizing the smaller company for not acting as a portal for the larger company is backwards. The focus should be on the practices of the large players.  Amazons formatting and pricing practices, Googles search engine and control of Android, mean their practices are the ones deserving of criticism.

DeanGibson
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Re: Have some faith in your products, B&N!

[ Edited ]

BFCoughlin wrote:

...  She loves my Nook Simple Touch.  She'd buy one, but then she couldn't read all the books she already has on her KF.  My mom bought a Kindle and lost it.  She, too, really likes my NST, and would have replaced the lost Kindle with one if it didn't mean losing access to the books that were on the Kindle. If they were able to read those books on their new Nooks, they'd probably go one to buy their future books from B&N. 


I have a friend who had a Kindle, and then admired my Nooks.  When her Kindle lost its ability to access WiFi, she downloaded her books via her PC and then to the Kindle via USB.  When the Kindle recently finally died, she converted all her books on her PC to ePub, bought a Nook Touch, and is very happy with the result.

2 Nook HD/8GB + 2 Nook HD+/16GB: B&N 2.2.0 rooted
2 Nook Touch (one Ltd. Ed.): B&N 1.2.1 rooted; Dell Venue 8 Pro: Windows 8.1
2 Nook 1stEd/3G: B&N 1.7.0 rooted.; Acer Iconia A500: Android 4.0.3 rooted;
Nook Color: B&N 1.4.3 rooted; Samsung Galaxy Tab2 (7.0"): Android 4.2.2 rooted
Customer loyalty is earned, not commanded or deserved, and easily lost.
Never suspect intent where incompetence will do.
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Wulfraed
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Registered: ‎11-24-2012
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Re: Have some faith in your products, B&N!

[ Edited ]

IGNORE: I'd misread a comment -- and my response had no applicability to the correct interpretation.

 

Baron Wulfraed
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TnTexas
Posts: 882
Registered: ‎10-22-2011

Re: Difference between the Nook Color, Nook Tablet, and Nook HD?

DeanGibson: The problem is, most people are not fools when it comes to money, and for those that are, they usually have friends that are not.  When you restrict users, if they find a suitable alternative, they will go there.  If that means a competitor's device, well then, that means your potential customer is spending most of his/her time at the competitor's store/web site, rather than at yours.

 

When the Nook Color was released, there was no suitable (read: economical) alternative, and even if B&N wasn't making much (or any) profit from the sales of Nook Colors to tablet-oriented users, it was the economic uniqueness of the Nook Color that put B&N on the map.

 

So true. I bought a Nook Color around August 2011 because it was the only e-reader I could find with an LCD display (wasn't interested in an e-ink one). I had a handful of Kindle books at the time that I was reading on my computer and no ties to B&N content wise. A month or so later, I ran across the N2A cards and bought one so I could read my Kindle books on my Color. Even then though, I stil made a point of ordering ebooks from B&N despite Amazon's prices being lower sometimes. Why? Because I felt a certain amount of loyalty to the company at the time.

 

After the Big Tablet Tussle, I realized that B&N didn't feel the same kind of loyalty toward me and that their main interest was their bottom line. Totally understandable on their part, but that attitude did cause me to reassess my relationship with them and exchange my loyalty-based relationship for a pure business-based one. As a result of that shift, when acceptable competition entered the 7" tablet market, I chose to walk out B&N's door rather than continue to deal with them.

 

************************************

 

BFCoughlin: This line of reasoning makes a lot of sense to me.  At present, opting for either the Nook or the Kindle locks one intyo that system unless one is willing to lose the investment one made in books already.

 

Not necessarily true. It depends on which devices you're talking about. I have no experience with the e-ink devices, but B&N's tablet devices are much more closed in that respect than the Kindle Fires. With the Fires, you can easily sideload the Nook app (as well as most other 3rd party apps you may want) and read your Nook books on them. From that perspective, the Kindle Fire is much more open and attractive for someone who wants to keep a foot in both ecosystems. Granted, the Nook devices have other selling points that will ultimately make them more attractive to some of those "divided loyalty" customers  (the memory slot comes to mind), but the ease of being able to download and read the competition's ebooks is not one of them. On that point, the Fire wins handsdown.

flyingtoastr
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Re: Difference between the Nook Color, Nook Tablet, and Nook HD?


TnTexas wrote:
I have no experience with the e-ink devices, but B&N's tablet devices are much more closed in that respect than the Kindle Fires. With the Fires, you can easily sideload the Nook app (as well as most other 3rd party apps you may want) and read your Nook books on them.

 

The new Kindle models (HD and the new Fire) actually have some programming that attempts to block certain apps from installing, even with the "allow apps from other sources" checked. Primarily it's aimed at anything that changes the lock and homescreen (so that you can't get around their "special offers" to BUY A NISSAN NOW), but it just so happens to make installing a non-Kindle reading app very difficult without further tweaks.

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bobstro
Posts: 3,521
Registered: ‎01-01-2012
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Re: Have some faith in your products, B&N!

[ Edited ]

patgolfneb wrote:

[...] Amazons insistence on a proprietary eBook format is telling. If Apple created an ap3 music format, and everyone else used mp3, with the restrictions similar to Amazons, plus drm, the outcry would be overwhelming. Instead of attacking BN the real focus should be on Amazon adopting an industry wide epub format and refraining from predatory pricing.


Pat, I agree with you 100% regarding Amazon's format & DRM. I will never buy an Amazon device, even though I find the Paperwhite technically compelling.

 

I am not attacking B&N, other that questioning some of their decisions. I think it would be to their ultimate benefit to provide a simple way for Kindle users to migrate to NOOKs. The Kindle app is one obvious solution.


[...] If BN is to recoup device development costs and not be price cut out of existence by Amazon and Google it cannot cede revenue streams like apps to competitors.

I disagree with you here on one point: The only apps that are really of interest to most of us, I suspect, are those that B&N doesn't sell. B&N does not cede a revenue stream for something they do not sell. What they do is make buying competitor's device less compelling by allowing the paying customer -- presumably someone like TnTexas who feels a bit of brand loyalty for having uprchased a NOOK -- to install it.

 

Again, I don't think trying to work things like this out, whether by rooting or other means, makes one into a "bad customer" for B&N.

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TnTexas
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Registered: ‎10-22-2011
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Re: Difference between the Nook Color, Nook Tablet, and Nook HD?

flyingtoastr: The new Kindle models (HD and the new Fire) actually have some programming that attempts to block certain apps from installing, even with the "allow apps from other sources" checked. Primarily it's aimed at anything that changes the lock and homescreen (so that you can't get around their "special offers" to BUY A NISSAN NOW), but it just so happens to make installing a non-Kindle reading app very difficult without further tweaks.

 

I don't have a Kindle Fire HD yet (have ordered one for my oldest for Christmas, though) so I can't verify it on my own, but there are several posts on the Kindle forums indicating that that's not the case for the Nook app -  that it works fine on the Kindle Fire HDs (the 7" verson at least). Guess I'll find out in a few days when my daughter's arrives and I try to install the Nook app on it.

DeanGibson
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Paradise lost


TnTexas wrote:... I stil made a point of ordering ebooks from B&N despite Amazon's prices being lower sometimes. Why? Because I felt a certain amount of loyalty to the company at the time.

 

After the Big Tablet Tussle, I realized that B&N didn't feel the same kind of loyalty toward me and that their main interest was their bottom line. Totally understandable on their part, but that attitude did cause me to reassess my relationship with them and exchange my loyalty-based relationship for a pure business-based one....


I have reproduced the above because that is so true for me as well.  I bought the Nook Color for viewing HTML and PDF files, with no intention of buying any B&N media.  However, soon after, I bought several eBooks from B&N.

 

However, the lockdown of the Tablet (even though quickly circumented) brought me to the same conclusion about B&N, and the eBook version of Leonard Maltin's 2010 Movie Guide (with invalid characters) brought me to an even worse assessment of the publishers.

 

I still watch B&N for interesting develoments, but I've lost the inclination to immediately buy their newest. 

2 Nook HD/8GB + 2 Nook HD+/16GB: B&N 2.2.0 rooted
2 Nook Touch (one Ltd. Ed.): B&N 1.2.1 rooted; Dell Venue 8 Pro: Windows 8.1
2 Nook 1stEd/3G: B&N 1.7.0 rooted.; Acer Iconia A500: Android 4.0.3 rooted;
Nook Color: B&N 1.4.3 rooted; Samsung Galaxy Tab2 (7.0"): Android 4.2.2 rooted
Customer loyalty is earned, not commanded or deserved, and easily lost.
Never suspect intent where incompetence will do.