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abrahamm
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎02-20-2013
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I find I'm an inadvertent Nook salesperson

I'm always extolling the virtures of my Nook.

 

Funny thing though, I'm the oldest person of those I try to sell on the idea of E-readers in general. I guess I'm somewhat of an early adopter.

 

Friends and relatives seem to tenaciously hang on to the idea that ownership of paper books is the only way to go. These people are avid readers. They insist on the quaint idea that the tactile pleasure of paper can't be dismissed and the building of a personal library a priority.

 

When you come up against this reluctance to switch - what arguments do you offer? Ah, besides the most obvious...i.e., portability, font and text choice.

 

Thanks!

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bobstro
Posts: 3,715
Registered: ‎01-01-2012
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Re: I find I'm an inadvertent Nook salesperson

Acknowledge that they're not wrong, first of all. There is something nice about sitting down with a book, wherever you happen to be, and reading. The NST can approach this, but you lose some of the immediate feedback such as seeing where you are in a book, and the ability to keep reading as your plane takes off. A lot of people take pride in the books they have on their shelves, and display them prominently in their homes (even if those really aren't the books they read most often.)

 

The NOOK has other advantages, and that's what you focus on. You can literally carry thousands of books along. Not every book winds up on the "shelf of pride" after all. With the NSTG, reading at night is much simpler. It's lighter than most books. To paraphrase an old saying "The best book is the one you have with you." The biggest dilema facing a book reader is what to take along on a trip when you've almost finished a book. Do you carry two, reading the last chapter(s) of the first before starting the second? Only the first, then have nothing? Only the second, interrupting reading the first? That's not an issue with the NOOK. You can also have a bonus stack of magazines along for quick reads.

 

I wouldn't focus on replacing the paper reading experience so much as extending one's ability to read more. If it's true, let them know how much more reading you're getting done now that you've got your bookshelf with you. How convenient it is to drop in a bag for travel. How useful to be able to drop by B&N and read for an hour before deciding to make a purchase (though you can do that with paper books too.) Show them the dictionary, the ability to search and other features you find useful. Emphasize the long battery life.

 

I don't view my NST as a replacement for reading actual books, but an extension of it. There's no way I'm taking a half dozen paper books along on a long trip.

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keriflur
Posts: 6,549
Registered: ‎01-05-2010
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Re: I find I'm an inadvertent Nook salesperson

My parents were avid paper book readers until I bought my father an NST for his birthday.  He loved it, and my mom loved it so much that she asked for one for her birthday.

 

I think the best way to convince someone that the NST is the way to go is simply to let them use one for more than a few minutes.  Sitting and reading a full book on one is enough to convince someone.  Sof if you want to convert your friends, you could get a second NST to lend out.  Pretty soon they'll all want their own.

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MacMcK1957
Posts: 2,170
Registered: ‎07-25-2011
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Re: I find I'm an inadvertent Nook salesperson

That's been my experience as well, that even the diehard "I need my paper book" readers change their tunes once they try the e-reader.  I am amazed at how popular they are with the elderly, especially for the font size choice.  Large-print books are expensive, and they're bulky and heavy, and not all books get released in that format.  The biggest evangelist for the Nook that I know is my elderly, half-blind mother.

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Joydeck
Posts: 37
Registered: ‎09-15-2012
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Re: I find I'm an inadvertent Nook salesperson

My Nook's six months old and, only now, am I beginning to prefer and choose reading on the Nook to the paper book.  Reading mainly classics, I revere almost instant access to a decent dictionary (thanks to update 1.2), easily finding obscure characters or incidents from earlier in the book, and highlighting remarkable or problematic passages.  I also access sideloaded Shakespearean, French, Italian and German dictionaries from time to time.  I keep these in Nook memory for easy access, and all the rest on my SD card.

 

Here's a useful trick I've stumbled upon.  To access look up, find or content, touch on the centre-line of the screen and, immediately, long before the menu appears, touch where the menu option you're seeking will appear.  This saves time and maintains concentration when reading.

 

For bookmarking, I tend to use highlight instead of bookmark because the bookmark feature bookmarks the physical-book page rather than the current screen, and there are often two screens per page.

 

I use shelves only for the books I'm currently reading.  One advantage of this is that my current place in both Nook Memory and the SD Memory Card is preserved. 

 

All in all, my enthusiasm for the Nook is growing.  I am toying with the idea of rooting my Nook to get quicker access to a browser.  While the hidden web browser does work, and I suspect more reliably in update 1.2.x, getting in every time takes far too long.

 

 

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bobstro
Posts: 3,715
Registered: ‎01-01-2012
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Re: I find I'm an inadvertent Nook salesperson

Joydeck wrote:

[...] I am toying with the idea of rooting my Nook to get quicker access to a browser.  While the hidden web browser does work, and I suspect more reliably in update 1.2.x, getting in every time takes far too long.

 

Keep your expectations for a browser on the NST modest. While you can run a browser on a rooted NST, the experience isn't anything near what you'd want to use for a lot of web surfing. It's sufficient to get through wifi captive portal logins and check an odd story out, but that's about it. I use Dolphin Mini, and it works reasonably well, within limits of the device.

 

 

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Mercury_Glitch
Posts: 1,377
Registered: ‎06-07-2011
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Re: I find I'm an inadvertent Nook salesperson

I figure I might as well throw my two cents in on this topic.  Since I work in a brick and mortar B&N, and I'm a regular bookseller at the Nook desk.

 

1) The books are still generally cheaper.  Yes ebook prices crept up a bit since they became popular, but for the most part you still save money when you buy them over the physical copy.  This ties in to the idea of making a physical book shelf of pride while reading every thing you want.  If you really love the book, get the physical, if you don't think it's worthy of a spot then save the money and get an ebook.

 

2) I point out that unlike with physical books borrowed from the library you will never have late fees, never wonder if the person reading the book before you read it while on the john, or in other less than desirable situations, etc.  Who cares where they read a digital book?  You don't actually touch it.

 

3) Highlighting, and dictionary.  A lot of my customers are bound to be in a bookclub, often they will be in more than one.  With the NST/G you can highlight and hop right back to that highlight for easy reference.  No need to bend corners, or to use sticky notes to mark pages. 

 

4) While the NST/G is not waterproof by any means, it can take getting a little wet, certainly much better than the average book. 

 

5) Read what you want, no one can sit and judge you for it.  Unlike physical books, the cover of an ebook is hidden once you've started to read, at least while you're reading it, if you go to the home screen or library it's certainly clear). 

 

6) Space is at a premium no matter where you live it always costs more to have more of it.  Keep the books you love, but read what you like.

 

Tying points 1 and 6 together I'll ask them how many books they read in a typical year.  Generally it's 10-20, and most often it's new hardcover books with a smattering of trade paper and mass markets thrown in.  I then walk them over to the HC bestsellers, and show them what the number of books they read a year looks like, point out that in another year that's doubled, and then do some rough price estimating since HC bestsellers are the generally the cheapest HC books, while on the Nook the bestsellers are typically around the same price as other ebooks that are only in HC.  Once they see those two points demonstrated they tend to start giving the Nook a bit more thought.

The Wheel weaves as the Wheel wills, and we are only the thread of the Pattern.
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bobstro
Posts: 3,715
Registered: ‎01-01-2012

Re: I find I'm an inadvertent Nook salesperson

Mercury_Glitch wrote:

[...] 4) While the NST/G is not waterproof by any means, it can take getting a little wet, certainly much better than the average book. 

 

You can definitely put a NST/G in a waterproof envelope and use it. Tough to do with a paper book. (Probably best used with the side buttons.)

 

5) Read what you want, no one can sit and judge you for it.  Unlike physical books, the cover of an ebook is hidden once you've started to read, at least while you're reading it, if you go to the home screen or library it's certainly clear). 

 

I'm always surprised when I see people (invariably women) walking around with a paper copy of 50 Shades of Gray. Not that there's anything wrong with that, but surely they know people are aware of what it's about. The joker in me always wants to start a conversation up by asking innocently if it's a good book and what it's about.

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Joydeck
Posts: 37
Registered: ‎09-15-2012
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Re: I find I'm an inadvertent Nook salesperson

For rooted browsing, I only wish to access though bookmarks: Google, Wiki, and various on-line dictionaries, and perhaps the weather radar. And, most important, I wish to switch quickly and painlessly from such web sites to the standard Nook reader, and back again. Is all this available on 1.2.1 through rooting with, for instance, Nook Manager?
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bobstro
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Re: I find I'm an inadvertent Nook salesperson

Joydeck wrote:
For rooted browsing, I only wish to access though bookmarks: Google, Wiki, and various on-line dictionaries, and perhaps the weather radar. And, most important, I wish to switch quickly and painlessly from such web sites to the standard Nook reader, and back again. Is all this available on 1.2.1 through rooting with, for instance, Nook Manager?

 

Nook Manager is the latest rooting tool, but it doesn't gain you anything over earlier methods. Its best feature is unifying the NST & NSTG rooting methods.

 

 

You can do those things on a rooted NST, but "quickly and painlessly" is relative. On my NST, I can long-press the 'n' button and see the last apps running, and use that to toggle back and forth as you describe. It does work, but it's just not very fast.

 

I'm not trying to discourage you, just setting realistic expectations.

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MacMcK1957
Posts: 2,170
Registered: ‎07-25-2011

Re: I find I'm an inadvertent Nook salesperson


Mercury_Glitch wrote:

...

5) Read what you want, no one can sit and judge you for it.  Unlike physical books, the cover of an ebook is hidden once you've started to read, at least while you're reading it, if you go to the home screen or library it's certainly clear). 

... 


Ahhh, I knew the conversation, sooner or later, would come back to Naughty Nurses on Holiday.

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bobstro
Posts: 3,715
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Re: I find I'm an inadvertent Nook salesperson

I still can't find that in the B&N bookstore.

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Mercury_Glitch
Posts: 1,377
Registered: ‎06-07-2011
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Re: I find I'm an inadvertent Nook salesperson


bobstro wrote:

I still can't find that in the B&N bookstore.


Naughty Nurses of St. Mercy  

The Wheel weaves as the Wheel wills, and we are only the thread of the Pattern.
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MacMcK1957
Posts: 2,170
Registered: ‎07-25-2011
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Re: I find I'm an inadvertent Nook salesperson


bobstro wrote:

I still can't find that in the B&N bookstore.


I thought Keri was working on writing it.  You'll need to check with her.

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RJR443
Posts: 142
Registered: ‎02-04-2011
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Re: I find I'm an inadvertent Nook salesperson

A long-time avid reader, I was forced into e-readers when my failing vision would no longer support print books, even large-print editions.  I was afraid that the hard plastic would be too uncomfortable to curl up with.  And I was right; the experience wasn't the same.  But I solved my problem with the purchase of a padded leather cover, admittedly not from BN.  Once I had my Nook installed into it, I had the tactile satisfaction I'd been missing;  I have a "book" again.  True, I  can't turn pages or feel paper, but that was never the point of reading in the first place.  At least, not for me.  What I wanted was what I had always wanted:  a comfortable way to read.  My Nook with a soft cover is close enough to satisfy my needs.

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Mercury_Glitch
Posts: 1,377
Registered: ‎06-07-2011
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Re: I find I'm an inadvertent Nook salesperson


RJR443 wrote:

A long-time avid reader, I was forced into e-readers when my failing vision would no longer support print books, even large-print editions.  I was afraid that the hard plastic would be too uncomfortable to curl up with.  And I was right; the experience wasn't the same.  But I solved my problem with the purchase of a padded leather cover, admittedly not from BN.  Once I had my Nook installed into it, I had the tactile satisfaction I'd been missing;  I have a "book" again.  True, I  can't turn pages or feel paper, but that was never the point of reading in the first place.  At least, not for me.  What I wanted was what I had always wanted:  a comfortable way to read.  My Nook with a soft cover is close enough to satisfy my needs.


 

I like the various silicon shells available, and I use the BN one because it was right there when I was looking for a case. 

The Wheel weaves as the Wheel wills, and we are only the thread of the Pattern.