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msmoonlite
Posts: 175
Registered: ‎10-03-2010
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Managing through Calibre

I just read a few posts where people mention managing their NST library through Calibre. I just recently installed this program to convert certain books so that I can put them on my NST. But I'm wondering if it is worth it to put my entire library in Calibre and manage things through it. Before I had some books stored in ADE, and the BN content I downloaded I just kept on my nook. As my library has grown, I'm becoming increasingly concerned about keeping things organized.

 

What do you use Claibre for? Do you think is a better storage platform than ADE?

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avid-reader-nc
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Registered: ‎05-08-2012
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Re: Managing through Calibre

I'll tell you why I use Calibre and how it works for me.  If that info helps you decide, great.

 

I had everything in Calibre because i was using a different e-reader and e-reader apps before getting the NST.  Other than for what I now believe was my user error, loading my books onto the NST was a snap!

Calibre recognized the NST and all I had to do was select the books, convert them, and point to the Calibre icon for delivering them to the NST.

 

I will continue to use Calibre because 1st, I know technology won't stand still and maybe someday I will buy a different (non B&N) e-reader.  I expect Calibre will do the same great job again.  2nd, with the way Calibre sets up it's library on my PC I can back it up just as a normal part of my PC back-up routine.

 

I am not familiar with ADE so I hope this info helps.

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roustabout
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Re: Managing through Calibre

One thing for all Calibre users to be aware of as they look at e-reading devices:  if, a year from now, there's a comely young e-reader thang showing you the outlines of her knickers and inviting you to take the plunge, be sure that she's not running Honeycomb or Ice Cream Sandwich under her sheets.

 

As of now, the Honeycomb and ICS devices pretty much suck as  far as being supported by Calibre - they don't let you mount the device as a disk drive, but require you to communicate with it almost as if you were talking to it over a modem.  This is a decision that Google has made on the back-end.  

 

The workaround is to unmount your removable disk, put it in your computer, and sync to the disk with Calibre.  And that does work, but for me it's a poor way to manage stuff - it's why I've stuck with the Nook platform rather than grabbing a Samsung for my color 7 inch device, for instance.   

"no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution.
DeanGibson
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Re: Managing through Calibre

[ Edited ]

roustabout wrote:

...

 

As of now, the Honeycomb and ICS devices pretty much suck as  far as being supported by Calibre - they don't let you mount the device as a disk drive, but require you to communicate with it almost as if you were talking to it over a modem.  


Does rooting, running Samba on the device, and mapping the network connection to a local PC drive, solve this problem?

2 Nook HD/8GB + 2 Nook HD+/16GB: B&N 2.2.0 rooted
2 Nook Touch (one Ltd. Ed.): B&N 1.2.1 rooted; Dell Venue 8 Pro: Windows 8.1
2 Nook 1stEd/3G: B&N 1.7.0 rooted.; Acer Iconia A500: Android 4.0.3 rooted;
Nook Color: B&N 1.4.3 rooted; Samsung Galaxy Tab2 (7.0"): Android 4.2.2 rooted
Customer loyalty is earned, not commanded or deserved, and easily lost.
Never suspect intent where incompetence will do.
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Sun_Cat
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Re: Managing through Calibre


roustabout wrote:

As of now, the Honeycomb and ICS devices pretty much suck as  far as being supported by Calibre - they don't let you mount the device as a disk drive, but require you to communicate with it almost as if you were talking to it over a modem.  This is a decision that Google has made on the back-end.  



True, if you want to use a USB cable. But any tablet having a web browser can play very nicely with Calibre wirelessly by connecting to the Calibre Content Server. It works just fine. There's also a relatively new Android app -- Calibre Library (which I haven't tried) - that apparently does the same without a browser. And several reader apps (Aldiko, for one) have native ability to connect directly to the Calibre Content Server.

 

To me, these are nicer alternatives than plugging in a USB cable anyway. I'm not tethered to my PC, I can browse my Calibre library to my heart's content, and I can choose books to transfer to my tablet.

 

Please visit me on Goodreads. Currently reading:
Journey Into Now by Leonard Jacobson
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wordsandmelodies
Posts: 355
Registered: ‎08-07-2010

Re: Managing through Calibre

Calibre is a much richer program than ADE.  It is updated weekly. Perhaps because of how many ebooks I have on my NOOK, ADE was R-E-A-L-L-Y slow for me on startup, and Calibre is much faster.  I can organize and sort my books in a bunch of different ways, including using tags.  I can edit coverart and metadata.  I can tweak the EPUB and fix typos in my ebooks, which otherwise drove me NUTS.  Should you, after making a well-considered decision, decide to strip the DRM from your ebooks, there are plugins that will do so for you in Calibre, too.  

 

Upon reflection, one of the things that I like about Calibre is that you can start out with the most basic functionality, and work up to doing some pretty complex things -- and the program makes them pretty straightforward.

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roustabout
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Re: Managing through Calibre

"But any tablet having a web browser can play very nicely with Calibre wirelessly by connecting to the Calibre Content Server. It works just fine." 

 

The last time I used it, it worked pretty badly for what I wanted to do.  I use the USB cable to do bulk management of titles, and moving groups of titles in and out via the web interface was very slow because I wasn't easily able to drag-select the groups of titles I wanted to work with. 

 

Also, the web interface doesn't know what you already have on your device, where bidirectional polling via the USB works very well. 

 

The SMB share idea is one I looked at briefly and haven't gone back to yet.  I think there was an issue with mounting sdcards and /media directories over SMB when I looked at it last - the SMB server for Android didn't support fat filesystems. 

"no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution.
DeanGibson
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Re: Managing through Calibre

[ Edited ]

roustabout wrote:....  I think there was an issue with mounting sdcards and /media directories over SMB when I looked at it last - the SMB server for Android didn't support fat filesystems.

It's the other way around:  Android Samba won't share non-vfat partitions.  I just tried it, mapping a subdirectory on /mnt/sdscard to PC drive Z:

 

The current version will share /mnt/sdcard and one other vfat partition.

 

2 Nook HD/8GB + 2 Nook HD+/16GB: B&N 2.2.0 rooted
2 Nook Touch (one Ltd. Ed.): B&N 1.2.1 rooted; Dell Venue 8 Pro: Windows 8.1
2 Nook 1stEd/3G: B&N 1.7.0 rooted.; Acer Iconia A500: Android 4.0.3 rooted;
Nook Color: B&N 1.4.3 rooted; Samsung Galaxy Tab2 (7.0"): Android 4.2.2 rooted
Customer loyalty is earned, not commanded or deserved, and easily lost.
Never suspect intent where incompetence will do.
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roustabout
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Re: Managing through Calibre

Dean corrects me:  "Android Samba won't share non-vfat partitions.  I just tried it, mapping a subdirectory on /mnt/sdscard to PC drive Z:"

 

OK, I had that backwards.  Perhaps what really happened was that I was trying to share an android native partition on the Asus tablet so that my library wouldn't be bound to the sdcard, and realized I couldn't.

 

But now that we know that parted can create vfat partitions at least as far along as Gingerbread, it's probably worth my seeing if the binary I have can manipulate partitions on the Asus - if so, I can slice off a small bit of the internal filesystem on it and share it out. 

 

Even if I temporarily flatten the Asus, I don't care too much, since I need to wipe it before I sell it in any event and perhaps nuking it will get me off my butt and ready to sell it.  I use it maybe once every two weeks at this point. 

"no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution.
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squirrelsnest
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Re: Managing through Calibre

The thing I like about Calibre is that I can rate the books I've read so I know which books I've read and which authors I liked.

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bobstro
Posts: 3,521
Registered: ‎01-01-2012

Calibre + cloud is a winner

[ Edited ]

DeanGibson wrote:

Does rooting, running Samba on the device, and mapping the network connection to a local PC drive, solve this problem?


I have used Calibre to bulk export my "to read" reading list to a directory structure that I sync up to my device using Dropbox on the Calibre server and Dropsync on my Android devices. This works on my NC, NT and NST, as well as the new Samsung. The target directory varies by device, but in all cases, I sync books to the NOOK folder (either /sdcard/My Files/Books for native NOOK devices, or /sdcard/Nook/MyDocuments/Books for Android devices running the NOOK app.) By using the NOOK directory, the magazines downloaded through the NOOK app are also automatically "in" my collection. I also have a cron job that pulls various newspaper and magazine news feeds from Calibre and populates and maintains a Dropbox folder for subscriptions. I haven't tried Calibre's rsync features yet.

 

I could, of course, skip Dropbox, and just use rsync to my own server, but Dropsync is convenient when I'm on the road.

 

Using Dropsync or rsync optimizes downloads and uploads, so only deltas are synchronized on each pass. I can use Calibre Library on any one of my devices to download a book into the appropriate directory, and it gets synced up with the other devices.

 

I can confirm that Calibre does not detect the Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 7.0 running ICS, but I haven't used a direct USB connection much as I'm usually in a different state than my Calibre server.

 

In recent days, I've begun experimenting with Mantano's cloud library service ($20 yearly for 4 devices, 5 GB, 2,000 books) and I'm quite pleased. In addition to having my books synchronized, it synchronizes reading positions. The Mantano home page is a pretty decent replacement for the B&N Library, with superior organization capabilities, and with the cloud service, everything is backed up. I like it so much that I've set Mantano Reader as my Library button on the NST. It's essentially a "Mantano Simple Touch" now.

 

I haven't tried FBreader in recent month, but I believe it can do many of these things as well.

 

So to tie this all together: I can still use Calibre for the essential library management functions, and maintaining reading lists. Its functionality is greatly enhanced through the use of networked/cloud services that allow access to files regardless of geographic location (assuming network availability).

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Marty-TX
Posts: 65
Registered: ‎02-12-2012

Re: Managing through Calibre


wordsandmelodies wrote:

Calibre is a much richer program than ADE.  It is updated weekly. Perhaps because of how many ebooks I have on my NOOK, ADE was R-E-A-L-L-Y slow for me on startup, and Calibre is much faster.  I can organize and sort my books in a bunch of different ways, including using tags.  I can edit coverart and metadata.  I can tweak the EPUB and fix typos in my ebooks, which otherwise drove me NUTS.  Should you, after making a well-considered decision, decide to strip the DRM from your ebooks, there are plugins that will do so for you in Calibre, too.  

 

Upon reflection, one of the things that I like about Calibre is that you can start out with the most basic functionality, and work up to doing some pretty complex things -- and the program makes them pretty straightforward.


Hi wordsandmelodies,

 

You summed it up very well: "you can start out with the most basic functionality, and work up to doing some pretty complex things".

 

I want to emphasize a couple of things. Calibre does NOT need a rooted Nook and Calibre is freeware.

 

It's one of the most useful programs that I use on a regular basis.

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bobstro
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Re: Managing through Calibre


Marty-TX wrote:

[...] I want to emphasize a couple of things. Calibre does NOT need a rooted Nook and Calibre is freeware.

 

It's one of the most useful programs that I use on a regular basis.


An excellent point! Calibre is well worth checking out, even for those only interersted in "the basics". I continue to be impressed with its capabilities. 

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msmoonlite
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Re: Managing through Calibre

Thanks for the feedback!!

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Kevin_0626
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Re: Managing through Calibre

Is there some trick to using Calibtre? I downloaded it, watched the video, then connected my Nook GL and nothing shows up as being in my Nook. I have over 200 books, at least 15 are downloaded but nothing shows. What gives?
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roustabout
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Re: Managing through Calibre

[ Edited ]

You have just learned why I started looking carefully at the partitioning and linking on the Nook Touch.

 

It paid off - the research applies in whole or in part to the new format NC and all of the NT.

 

The "BN reserved" area lives - normally - in a part of the glowworm that you're not permitted to see from your computer. 

 

/data/media is where BN stores its stuff, and you are left with the 240 meg /media partition to store your

own sideloads.  You can also add a card and sideload to that.

 

But the system can be worked around.  If you're fairly technical (ie, have a linux based computer or VM and familiarity with commandline tools) it's a pretty straightforward thing to boot from a special disk called noogie, resize your /data and /media partitions nondestructively with gparted.  you can then root your glowworm and from within the nook OS, remove the default /data/media directory and link /data/media to /media.

 

That's how I set up my NST about 9 months ago and it's been very stable.  (I prefer to read the NST version of the New Yorker to the NC/NT versions.  I also wanted my preferred ebook reader to easily see all of my files.) 

 

If you're less technical you can try setting up your glowworm to use an sdcard in place of /data/media. 

 

The logic is the same as using the onboard /media partitiong, but I wrote a script for setting it up which can be installed without rooting your device. 

 

Instructions are on the forums fairly recently and at length at

 

http://nookworks.blogspot.com/2012/05/fat-glowworm-using-your-sd-card-as.html

 

The potential issues to this second approach are:

- we don't yet know what effect doing it this way may  have on battery life

- if your sdcard decides not to mount, you lose access to your library while you sort it out

- it's not exactly a best practice to have an android app think it's writing data in one place, and actually write data somewhere else. 

 

That said, I've been very happy with the results on my NST and my NT and the early results on the glowworm (of using /media)

 

If there are problems using /sdcard for it, the process can be reversed (I just need to write a second script.) 

"no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution.
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kamas716
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Re: Managing through Calibre


Kevin_0626 wrote:
Is there some trick to using Calibtre? I downloaded it, watched the video, then connected my Nook GL and nothing shows up as being in my Nook. I have over 200 books, at least 15 are downloaded but nothing shows. What gives?

If all of your books have been direct downloads through B&N, you won't see them.  Roustabout can explain better than I about how to get to see them on the B&N hidden partition. 

 

Calibre will see what you've sideloaded onto the device or your SD card.  If you haven't already, I'd suggest downloading the Nook for PC app. onto your computer and then downloading all of your books to your computer.  This way you can make a back up copy of all your reading material through B&N as well as utilizing Calibre for your B&N books.  Any changes you make to your books will have then have to be sideloaded onto your Nook (you can archive the B&N direct downloaded copy to get it off your Nook so you don't have multiple copies of the same book).

http://www.goodreads.com/kamas716
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Kevin_0626
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Re: Managing through Calibre

Thanks to you both for your responses. I was mainly going to use it to manage and categorize my books since shelves don't really work anymore. I don' t feel comfortable rooting the device so I guess I will de lete calibre and hope B&N provides better organization tools soon.
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roustabout
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Re: Managing through Calibre

" hope B&N provides better organization tools soon."

 

That is almost certainly not going to be soon (measured in months, rather than years.)

 

Better tools for organizing, and preferably tools that let you organize and back up your file structure, have been requested since the first nooks hit the market.

 

Despite the fact that Sony figured out a way to do this, it doesn't seem to be a priority at BN. 

 

My method doesn't require that you root your device;  you boot from a special card once, make the change, and when you reboot you need an sdcard inserted for your library to download to, but you can see the files on that card and organize them as you see fit. 

 

Unfortunately, you can't use Calibre to make shelves that are useful within the BN stock reader, as you apparently can with the Sony devices. 

"no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." Fourth Amendment to the US Constitution.
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msmoonlite
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Re: Managing through Calibre

[ Edited ]

I didn't root, and I'm not technologically savvy enough to do all of that partition work.

 

I had about 100 books just on my NST in the partitioned BN part. Then I noticed that my storage was running low, and I knew that I had at least 100 other ebooks in other places that I wanted access to. What I did to get around the storage issue was to download Calibre. then buy an SD card with enough storage for at least another thousand books (2GB). I can always expand that by getting a bigger card.

 

Right now I have all of my ebooks in Calibre, which is why I wanted tips on using it to organize. I figure the SD card now is big enough to have my entire ebook library on it (yes I am one of those have to have my books at my fingertips all the time people). As I expand my library and get bigger cards I know where all of my books are and how much space I need through Calibre. Now I have to worry about using up space on my laptop. :smileywink: