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DeanGibson
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Way to go, Adobe

When I bought my first Nook in 03/2011, I (almost) immediately installed the Adobe Reader for Android, since displaying PDF files was a top priority for me.  Over the years, I have received numerous updates to the app on the Nook Color (and my Motorola Droid phone).

 

This week, I received an update notice for the Reader on my other Android devices (all 4.x), and updated them on those devices.  However, the Android Market Google Play Store on my Nook Color and Motorola Droid (both running Android 2.x) show that the Store app is "not compatible" with those devices, despite the fact that an older version is already installed on those devices.

 

The update was applied successfully to my Nook HD+ tablets (running 4.x).

 

This also happened to another app I use, but it was fixed after a complaint.

2 Nook HD/8GB + 2 Nook HD+/16GB: B&N 2.2.0 rooted
2 Nook Touch (one Ltd. Ed.): B&N 1.2.1 rooted; Dell Venue 8 Pro: Windows 8.1
2 Nook 1stEd/3G: B&N 1.7.0 rooted.; Acer Iconia A500: Android 4.0.3 rooted;
Nook Color: B&N 1.4.3 rooted; Samsung Galaxy Tab2 (7.0"): Android 4.2.2 rooted
Customer loyalty is earned, not commanded or deserved, and easily lost.
Never suspect intent where incompetence will do.
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keriflur
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Re: Way to go, Adobe


DeanGibson wrote:

When I bought my first Nook in 03/2011, I (almost) immediately installed the Adobe Reader for Android, since displaying PDF files was a top priority for me.  Over the years, I have received numerous updates to the app on the Nook Color (and my Motorola Droid phone).

 

This week, I received an update notice for the Reader on my other Android devices (all 4.x), and updated them on those devices.  However, the Android Market Google Play Store on my Nook Color and Motorola Droid (both running Android 2.x) show that the Store app is "not compatible" with those devices, despite the fact that an older version is already installed on those devices.

 

The update was applied successfully to my Nook HD+ tablets (running 4.x).

 

This also happened to another app I use, but it was fixed after a complaint.


Not sure what the big deal is here - aren't the older versions working just fine on devices running 2.x?

 

You're rooted and backing up your apps, right?

DeanGibson
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Re: Way to go, Adobe


keriflur wrote:

Not sure what the big deal is here - aren't the older versions working just fine on devices running 2.x?

 

You're rooted and backing up your apps, right?


No big deal.  Yes, they are rooted & backed up.  The older versions work fine, and there are no "new features" that I need.

 

It's just part of the common practice by developers or companies, of dropping support for older devices or OSes (usually for no good reason) that "no one uses any more".

 

It's not even "planned obsolescence";  it's usually just laziness.  It's like the apps that are "not compatible" with the Nook because the Nook doesn't have a camera, GPS, or phone, even though the app will run (albeit with some features disabled).  The app designer/coder is too lazy to check for the non-existence of some capability and allow for it.

2 Nook HD/8GB + 2 Nook HD+/16GB: B&N 2.2.0 rooted
2 Nook Touch (one Ltd. Ed.): B&N 1.2.1 rooted; Dell Venue 8 Pro: Windows 8.1
2 Nook 1stEd/3G: B&N 1.7.0 rooted.; Acer Iconia A500: Android 4.0.3 rooted;
Nook Color: B&N 1.4.3 rooted; Samsung Galaxy Tab2 (7.0"): Android 4.2.2 rooted
Customer loyalty is earned, not commanded or deserved, and easily lost.
Never suspect intent where incompetence will do.
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doncr
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Re: Way to go, Adobe

Dean, weren't you in the software development business?  Don't you think it's a more of a business decision rather than laziness? 

 

How many sales/subscriptions of Acrobat Pro will Adobe lose if they drop support for the Nook Color?  I'd be willing to wager it's not enough for them to worry about compared to the additional support costs. 

 

 

DeanGibson
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Re: Way to go, Adobe


doncr wrote:

Dean, weren't you in the software development business?  Don't you think it's a more of a business decision rather than laziness? 

 

How many sales/subscriptions of Acrobat Pro will Adobe lose if they drop support for the Nook Color?  I'd be willing to wager it's not enough for them to worry about compared to the additional support costs. 

 

 


A lot of so-call business decisions are laziness over customer support, in my opinion.  Kinda like their recent approach to password security.

 

I'm not sure what Acrobat Pro has to do with this.  Adobe has (and has had for years) a vested interest in making the PDF format ubiquitous on every device in the word capable of displaying text, and has bee pretty successful in doing that.

 

Now, it may be that the Adobe site has sideloadable files of older versions;  I haven't checked.

 

Consider by comparison "Titanium Backup", an Android application which requires root and likely has Android-version-specific code, proclaims (on Google Play) that it runs on Android 1.5-4.4.  And this app from a company that offers it for free (although you can donate).

2 Nook HD/8GB + 2 Nook HD+/16GB: B&N 2.2.0 rooted
2 Nook Touch (one Ltd. Ed.): B&N 1.2.1 rooted; Dell Venue 8 Pro: Windows 8.1
2 Nook 1stEd/3G: B&N 1.7.0 rooted.; Acer Iconia A500: Android 4.0.3 rooted;
Nook Color: B&N 1.4.3 rooted; Samsung Galaxy Tab2 (7.0"): Android 4.2.2 rooted
Customer loyalty is earned, not commanded or deserved, and easily lost.
Never suspect intent where incompetence will do.
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bobstro
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Re: Way to go, Adobe

DeanGibson wrote:

[...] Consider by comparison "Titanium Backup", an Android application which requires root and likely has Android-version-specific code, proclaims (on Google Play) that it runs on Android 1.5-4.4.  And this app from a company that offers it for free (although you can donate).

 

 

I suspect that a lot of the big software firms just target the latest Android versions, possibly for new features, but most likely just to make sure they work on the latest-greatest toys. In that process, they seem to forget their previous customers. Since Acrobat viewer is free, they probably don't give it a lot of priority.

 

Many of the smaller firms, by contrast, seem to focus a lot more on keeping existing customers happy. The newer versions of Mantano Reader, for example, won't run on the NST, but the old version works fine. At least until recently (I haven't checked in a few months), I could still get the old version from GoPS. Titanium Backup is still a top-tier app -- I think it's one of the GoPS best sellers in fact -- yet maintains backwards compatibility. If you're NOT Adobe-sized, caring for existing customers seems to be a good idea.

 

For a big firm, maintaining two versions, even if one is not updated any more, doesn't seem to be worth their while, at least in accounting terms. I just find it odd that smaller firms are more responsive in this regard.

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doncr
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Re: Way to go, Adobe

Adobe makes no money directly from Acrobat Reader.  They do however make money on Acrobat Pro and that is how they are able to give Acrobat Reader away free of charge (create the defacto digital document format, then sell tools that allow the creation of that content).

 

How much will the decision to cancel future versions of Acrobat Reader for older platforms such as the Nook Color cost Adobe in potential future sales of Acrobat Pro?  I'd say they determined that any loss was inconsequential.  That's why I say this was a business decision and not simple laziness.

 

 

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bobstro
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Re: Way to go, Adobe

[ Edited ]

Adobe does still provide downloads for older versions of Acrobat Reader. The version available there is supported on Android 2.2 Froyo, which I believe both the NC with B&N firmware and Droid 2 support. The new Reader X requires 2.3.3+ Gingerbread according to GoPS. Updating manually is annoying, but at least that's an option.

 

I suppose they look at the declining market share of older Android versions and decide what to cut based on that. I can understand wanting to move forward to support new devices. Some programs just seem to update to a new SDK version without adding significantly new features. It would just be nice of the last version would be kept in GoPS for a longer period.

 

Time to load CyanogenMod on those older devices, Dean! I ran CM based on 2.3 Gingerbread on my Droid 2, though a few features didn't work well on the early betas.

 

 

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keriflur
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Re: Way to go, Adobe

[ Edited ]

bobstro wrote:

Time to load CyanogenMod on those older devices, Dean! I ran CM based on 2.3 Gingerbread on my Droid 2, though a few features didn't work well on the early betas.

 


I've given up on CM as I've never installed it on a device and had everything work, ever, even with tweaks.  I get what they're up against, with the makers turning out new phones 3-4-5 times a year, all with completely different specs, and I think the work they're doing is tremendous, but I don't see it as a viable solution for a daily driver.

 

The biggest problem I have with Android overall is the abandonment issue.  Makers release phones that never see updates or see one update over their entire life, and that one update breaks things that never get fixed.  Even the top tier, highly anticipated phones are tossed to the side after 6 months or so with a few updates and then nothing.  The only options to update become CM and other roms and the devs pretty much only focus on the latest and greatest, because that's where the excitement is, and who can blame them - they're working for free, after all, they should work on what makes them happy.

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bobstro
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Re: Way to go, Adobe

I was surprised that my now-superceded Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 got an update last night. My now old Motorola Razr Maxx HD got an update last week. Even my $150 Walmart special 7 inch Hisense tablet got an update a couple of months ago. Some devices don't see updates, but I'm pleased to see some manufacturers still pushing them out.

 

CM7.2, based on Android 2.3, is very solid on the NC. With such a minimal feature set, there's not a lot to support. This version is no longer being developed, and I didn't find anything that didn't work. Of course, it's not as pretty as the newer versions based on Android 4.x, but it performs stably and reliably.

 

On a more featureful device like the Droid 2, there are a lot more issues. I recall having problems with GPS and camera, though these were mostly cleaned up over time. 

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keriflur
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Re: Way to go, Adobe


bobstro wrote:

I was surprised that my now-superceded Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 got an update last night. My now old Motorola Razr Maxx HD got an update last week. Even my $150 Walmart special 7 inch Hisense tablet got an update a couple of months ago. Some devices don't see updates, but I'm pleased to see some manufacturers still pushing them out.


My N7(2012) is the only device I own that still receives updates (I'm waiting on the kitkat OTA), and I have three devices under two years old. The Rezound was the most anticipated android phone of late 2011 and it was forgotten within 9 months of launch (6 months after I got it).  My DInc4G (released early summer 2012) was forgotten within weeks, got one half-baked update, and HTC can't even be bothered to allow users to unlock the bootloader, so no root for us.  The general rule seems to be that if the device isn't at least as big as your head, it's not even worth looking at, because it's never gonna get care from the maker or the dev community.

 

This is why I now have an iphone.  Not because I love Apple, but because Android is no place for people who think that holding a tablet to your head to have a phone convo is stupid.

 

I am, BTW, still under contract for that Rezound that hasn't been updated in 18 months.  Another reason I've got the iphone now - resale value.  I wanted to sell the Rezound to recoup some of the money I laid out to buy the DInc4G off contract, but resale value on a 4-month-old, perfect-condition device was so low it wasn't worth the effort.  This is, I assume, in part because every time you turn around there's a new android phone, but also because people know they're not going to get updates, they're just going to slide down into the old tech sinkhole.

 

As far as Adobe goes, I could tell you stories about the crap that company does to its business customers.  They'll lie repeatedly to get a sale, then deny knowledge of known issues once the customer is up to their ears in problems.  I saw firsthand what they do on a project I worked on, and have heard stories from others who've used their business software. Their disregard for paying customers goes a lot further than just not making software backwards compatible.

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bobstro
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Re: Way to go, Adobe

[ Edited ]

keriflur wrote: [...] This is why I now have an iphone.  Not because I love Apple, but because Android is no place for people who think that holding a tablet to your head to have a phone convo is stupid.

 

If that's why you switched, you'd better keep running! Apple's considering doing a phablet according to some press. :smileyhappy:

 

I like getting updates to the device OS, but so long as the core features work, it's not something I have to have. I've been surprised at the recent batch, but haven't noticed any earth-shaking improvments. The NC update to Froyo was much appreciated since it introduced some real improvements at the time.

 

I went through about a year-long period of obsessively updating my Droid 2 with new CM versions until I got sick of it, went back to stock and enjoyed all the extra free time. However, if I needed specific software, that'd be a good reason to convert. I did do a final CM load on my NCs and NT, but don't tinker with them often.

 

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keriflur
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Re: Way to go, Adobe


bobstro wrote:

If that's why you switched, you'd better keep running! Apple's considering doing a phablet according to some press. :smileyhappy:

 


Ah, that's just a rumor, and the press is notoriously bad at predicting Apple more than a month or so in advance of an announcement.  And even if they did, they'll still keep updating the 5s for at least two years, and the updates will actually work 100% on the hardware (if they're done fresh), unlike my experience with Android.  And besides, the d@** phone cost so much that I'll actually be keeping it for two years.

 

Also, even if they did go big, we don't know if they'd go big only, big as flagship, or make a couple of sizes, all equal.  The problem I've had with the Android makers is that only the big phones get the good specs (and updates), and I like lots of storage and a nice camera in a one-handed, girl-sized* package.  If Apple goes with a big and a little and puts quality specs on both, I'll be a happy camper and will buy from them again... in 2 years.  If they don't and two years from now there's an android maker putting great specs in a little phone, I'll be happy to jump back over the fence.

 

 

*By girl-sized, I mean it needs to be able to fit into the front pocket of women's low-waist size 25/26-waist jeans or 0/2 sized pants.  If it doesn't go in, or goes in but sticks out more than halfway, it's too big.