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Schwa
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Re: What does Nook need to do to survive?


roustabout wrote:

I was actually just having fun completely inverting the meaning via selective quotation.  I did not intend to and do not appear to have offended anyone, plus how else could I liken a horde of Noo Yawk execs lashed together with neckties and nylons into a corpulent raft to ants crossing the Amazon? 

 


 


Oh, I wasn't chastising you, I was just thinking "He isn't serious is he?"  Also, I'm thinking that really is a pic of FT.  I saw it on the interwebz so it must be true, eh?  :smileyvery-happy:

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bobstro
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Re: What does Nook need to do to survive?

Well yes, that's the jobs miracle. Enough low paying jobs that everybody can have 2 or 3.
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EllenKeiff
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Re: What does Nook need to do to survive?

While my post is cathartic - there is also a ring of wishfulness in it.  I certainly do not mean fire them all at once, but I do mean get rid of the ones lacking common sense or a vision for the future.  For example, I think we can (mostly) agree from an employee (Toaster/MG) and a customer (myself included) point of view that calling a call center located in Bangladesh is just about the most frustrating thing when you have an actual issue.  Ergo - what genius in executivedom thought of a call center?  Yes, I am sure its good for the bottom line, but is it good for customer retention?  Nope?  Then let's either can him (or her) or at the very least demote them so they aren't making such decisions anymore.....

 

 

 

 

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Wulfraed
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Re: What does Nook need to do to survive?


EllenKeiff wrote:

 

Ergo - what genius in executivedom thought of a call center?  Yes, I am sure its good for the bottom line, but is it good for customer retention?  Nope?  Then let's either can him (or her) or at the very least demote them so they aren't making such decisions anymore.....

 


I suspect that, at the top, you will find that pressure for outsourced call centers (used by lots of companies -- heck, the reps probably handle calls from different makers: Call comes in, phone identifies "called number" which identifies which "company" the rep will be answering as, while the rep pulls a loose-leaf binder off the shelf with the script for that company) -- uh, pardon the side-track... The pressure probably came from the Board of Directors and worked down... And BoD often end up being interlinked, so a few people thinking outsourced call centers are good showing up on the boards of half a dozen companies means a half dozen companies all contracting for outsourced call centers.

 

The other thing you have to remember is: the Board of Directors don't care about "customers" except as it affects the value of the stock (and any dividends issued). The BoD answers to the stock holders, not customers or employees. Until both existing customers flee, and no new customers come in, complaints about call centers may not be affecting the stock value.

 

Baron Wulfraed
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Mercury_Glitch
Posts: 1,323
Registered: ‎06-07-2011

Re: What does Nook need to do to survive?

[ Edited ]

Wulfraed wrote:

EllenKeiff wrote:

 

Ergo - what genius in executivedom thought of a call center?  Yes, I am sure its good for the bottom line, but is it good for customer retention?  Nope?  Then let's either can him (or her) or at the very least demote them so they aren't making such decisions anymore.....

 


I suspect that, at the top, you will find that pressure for outsourced call centers (used by lots of companies -- heck, the reps probably handle calls from different makers: Call comes in, phone identifies "called number" which identifies which "company" the rep will be answering as, while the rep pulls a loose-leaf binder off the shelf with the script for that company) -- uh, pardon the side-track... The pressure probably came from the Board of Directors and worked down... And BoD often end up being interlinked, so a few people thinking outsourced call centers are good showing up on the boards of half a dozen companies means a half dozen companies all contracting for outsourced call centers.

 

The other thing you have to remember is: the Board of Directors don't care about "customers" except as it affects the value of the stock (and any dividends issued). The BoD answers to the stock holders, not customers or employees. Until both existing customers flee, and no new customers come in, complaints about call centers may not be affecting the stock value.

 


 

A smart BoD should recognize that a failing company is going to bring disappointment to the stock holders and thus do things to keep the customers the company has and attract new ones. 

 

That aside I think the idea has merit.  If you push for an idea which not only fails but causes the reverse to happen you should be held to the flame.  I tack that second bit on because if you terrify your employees with termination or demotion on the basis of a single idea not taking off you'll end up with no new ideas.  However if you point out that if an idea fails and in failing it drives customers away or profits down then there could be consequences you're more likely to get well thought out ideas. 

 

A better example would be the person who decided the BN Membership program would have absolutely no benefit to Nook owners for their Nooks.

The Wheel weaves as the Wheel wills, and we are only the thread of the Pattern.
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patgolfneb
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Re: What does Nook need to do to survive?

I think these kind of decisions, call centers, etc are driven by the culture dominating boards and upper ,management these days. 

 

The focus for a long time has been on mba educated numbers driven executives. A large number have little or no line experience or experience in developing and manufacturing a product. 

  

I believe this is a big part of Apple's success under Jobs. He had been there at the inititial time all the issues of product content, quality, customer service etc had to be addressed. His failures helped him address these issues even more effectively when he returned. Look at Apple Genuis, he gave customer service a catchy name so he could charge for it. He pushed for products that were polished at introduction and often had polished software but average hardware and got premium prices for it. The reason Ford didn't go bankrupt is they returned to improving their product just in time. Chrysler and GM tried to market their way out with incentives, ads, and numbers games.

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5ivedom
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Re: What does Nook need to do to survive?

The thing about Ford is very true.

 

*****

 

Regarding Board of Directors.

 

Yes, they are very detached from customers.

 

Often these are people who've not really worked in the company and hardly ever at the customer interfacing level.

 

For them it's easy to fall into the trap of thinking of customers as non-human i.e. just mobile ATMs that work in logical, easy to control ways.

 

*****

 

I think the Call center thing probably started with

 

1) Products that were not good enough and needing lots of customer service help.

 

That meant customer service costs became too high. Instead of improving quality Management decided to try the bandaid of reducing the cost of customer service.

 

Without factoring in the disadvantages of lowering quality of customer service.

 

So instead of

 

Great Product Quality + Great Customer Service

 

they end up with

 

Lower Product Quality + Lower Customer Service Quality.

 

And in most of the cases they don't even realize that it's improving the product quality that's the fix. Not outsourcing everything.

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patgolfneb
Posts: 1,717
Registered: ‎09-10-2011

Re: What does Nook need to do to survive?


5ivedom wrote:

The thing about Ford is very true.

 

*****

 

Regarding Board of Directors.

 

Yes, they are very detached from customers.

 

Often these are people who've not really worked in the company and hardly ever at the customer interfacing level.

 

For them it's easy to fall into the trap of thinking of customers as non-human i.e. just mobile ATMs that work in logical, easy to control ways.

 

*****

 

I think the Call center thing probably started with

 

1) Products that were not good enough and needing lots of customer service help.

 

That meant customer service costs became too high. Instead of improving quality Management decided to try the bandaid of reducing the cost of customer service.

 

Without factoring in the disadvantages of lowering quality of customer service.

 

So instead of

 

Great Product Quality + Great Customer Service

 

they end up with

 

Lower Product Quality + Lower Customer Service Quality.

 

And in most of the cases they don't even realize that it's improving the product quality that's the fix. Not outsourcing everything.


On the call center well put. Deesy gets credit for making the same point in a flip manner, but you are both right. If you really want customer service costs to be low long term get your product right. But that makes my point, instead of responding to numbers by addressing the problem, numbers guys often make simplisistic responses that ignore the real problem. Another example is product shortcuts which save pennies and  alienate customers, adding value, not cheapening the product woorks better long term. Otherwise the cost savings better be enough to make a big difference, 25% or something, any small advantage your competitors will match, and customers will fail to recognize.

flyingtoastr
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Re: What does Nook need to do to survive?

[ Edited ]

I disagree about call center costs being about "cheap" products, at least not entirely.

 

We actually field a large number of phone calls for NOOK support at the store where I work, and a large number (probably close to a majority) have nothing to do with issues with the device. Rather, they are simple questions about how to use features or people who can't remember how to do something or the like. Granted, I live in a *slightly* more "life experienced" area than most of the US and it definitely impacts the demographics purchasing NOOKs here. But there are a large number of customer service calls that have nothing to do with the build quality of the device.

 

And it's another example of something that could be rectified with a strong push towards store customer support. I suggested to corperate way back in the NOOK Color days that there should be a way (app? My NOOK Today?) to tie a device into the RSS feeds for the "Stores & Events" calendar that appears right on this website, pushing out contact information, scheduled events, NOOK tutorials, and other good stuff right to a customer's NOOK from the store level. But nothing has come of that.

 

I think outsourced customer service comes back to one thing: reducing costs. We're obsessed with getting our products as cheaply as possible in the US, and for OEM's to deliver what we're demanding at the prices we're willing to pay the only possible solution is to outsource everything to countries that can do it stupidly cheaply. That's everything, from design to manufacturing to after-the-sale-support. If we as a society want higher quality products and support, we need to get over the cheap pricepoints and be willing to pay a premium price for domestic products.

 

But given how much people exploded when the price of an ebook went up $3 I don't see it changing any time soon...

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deesy58
Posts: 2,407
Registered: ‎01-22-2012

Re: What does Nook need to do to survive?


EllenKeiff wrote:

While my post is cathartic - there is also a ring of wishfulness in it.  I certainly do not mean fire them all at once, but I do mean get rid of the ones lacking common sense or a vision for the future.  For example, I think we can (mostly) agree from an employee (Toaster/MG) and a customer (myself included) point of view that calling a call center located in Bangladesh is just about the most frustrating thing when you have an actual issue.  Ergo - what genius in executivedom thought of a call center?  Yes, I am sure its good for the bottom line, but is it good for customer retention?  Nope?  Then let's either can him (or her) or at the very least demote them so they aren't making such decisions anymore.....

 

 

 

 


Do your part!!  Purchase B&N stock and vote for the directors who will best represent your interests!

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deesy58
Posts: 2,407
Registered: ‎01-22-2012
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Re: What does Nook need to do to survive?


Wulfraed wrote:

EllenKeiff wrote:

 

Ergo - what genius in executivedom thought of a call center?  Yes, I am sure its good for the bottom line, but is it good for customer retention?  Nope?  Then let's either can him (or her) or at the very least demote them so they aren't making such decisions anymore.....

 


I suspect that, at the top, you will find that pressure for outsourced call centers (used by lots of companies -- heck, the reps probably handle calls from different makers: Call comes in, phone identifies "called number" which identifies which "company" the rep will be answering as, while the rep pulls a loose-leaf binder off the shelf with the script for that company) -- uh, pardon the side-track... The pressure probably came from the Board of Directors and worked down... And BoD often end up being interlinked, so a few people thinking outsourced call centers are good showing up on the boards of half a dozen companies means a half dozen companies all contracting for outsourced call centers.

 

The other thing you have to remember is: the Board of Directors don't care about "customers" except as it affects the value of the stock (and any dividends issued). The BoD answers to the stock holders, not customers or employees. Until both existing customers flee, and no new customers come in, complaints about call centers may not be affecting the stock value.

 


I think you are close, Baron.  But ... loose-leaf binders are so 20th Century (and Mitt Romney).  What they really use is probably an Access database with a lot of "Memo" text, or a PDF file that they view on their monitors.  :smileywink:

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RHWright
Posts: 1,612
Registered: ‎10-21-2009

Re: What does Nook need to do to survive?


flyingtoastr wrote:

And it's another example of something that could be rectified with a strong push towards store customer support. I suggested to corperate way back in the NOOK Color days that there should be a way (app? My NOOK Today?) to tie a device into the RSS feeds for the "Stores & Events" calendar that appears right on this website, pushing out contact information, scheduled events, NOOK tutorials, and other good stuff right to a customer's NOOK from the store level. But nothing has come of that.

 


This.

 

I've been saying & posting for a long time that there needs to be more integration and touchpoints between the devices and the stores. It's one of NOOKs unique advantages.

 

You should not only to be able to get store event information at will or via RSS on the devices, but shop B&N's full online catalog, make purchases (including ship-to-home and ship-to-store), reserve books at stores, etc. It would also be nice to easily access chat support via the devices for when you have a question that is more functional (how do I do x?) than issue related (my device is broken).

 

There are so many lost opportunities for utilizing the synergy between the device/online and B&M locations.

 

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5ivedom
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Re: What does Nook need to do to survive?

What do people think these are:

 

*****

There are so many lost opportunities for utilizing the synergy between the device/online and B&M locations.

*****

 

For me I see the ability for users to talk to a real person and get help.

And having a real bookstore to go to.

 

However, are there any advantages that are very big difference makers apart from the 'real person to help you' one?

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Mercury_Glitch
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Re: What does Nook need to do to survive?

'In Store' deals

 

Coupons for things from the cafe presented on your Nook (N1E had this for a time)

 

Charging kiosks, where you pay 'x' amount to charge your Nook for a given time.  And before anyone says 'you should let us charge it for free!' no.  That's something the drives the stores cost of operation up which puts more pressure to make money but in itself generates very little.  And I'm not saying charge high prices, maybe 2 dollars an hour.  That would let you fully charge your Nook for 6 bucks.  It's not something you might need to do every day but for those times when you get caught it would be nice.  Break it in to 1$ for every half hour just to give some flexibility.  Don't charge tax or a service fee so it's a nice easy transaction. 

 

I realize that last one may be less than popular, but it's something that would get people in the store, and it's a service for your Nook. 

 

As has been stated, in the 'Your Nook Today' or 'The Daily' put local store events.

 

That's from a customer benefit view point.

 

From a device benefit viewpoint

 

Enable feedback from the booksellers that goes to the devs.  We are the people who speak to the public about the Nook.  We deal with the issues, we hear the demands.  Why they have not implemented a way for us to quickly and easily get that information directly in to the hands of the people making the Nook is beyond me.

 

Right now the best method is for me to talk to one of my managers, then for them to talk to a district or regional manager, and it goes on from there.  Or for me to talk to the district or regional manager when they visit which is random and not generally announced. 

 

It's something that infuriates me on nearly every day I work.  Certainly every day I work and I'm assigned to work at the Nook desk (which is often).  I have repeat customers who I talk with every time I see them.  I wish I felt asking them for their feedback on the Nook was even worth the energy to speak the words.  But it's not.  Instead I try my best to work around the issues they have with the knowledge I have. 

 

 

The Wheel weaves as the Wheel wills, and we are only the thread of the Pattern.
DeanGibson
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Re: What does Nook need to do to survive?

[ Edited ]

Mercury_Glitch wrote:
....

 

Charging kiosks, where you pay 'x' amount to charge your Nook for a given time.  And before anyone says 'you should let us charge it for free!' no.  That's something the drives the stores cost of operation up which puts more pressure to make money but in itself generates very little.  And I'm not saying charge high prices, maybe 2 dollars an hour.  That would let you fully charge your Nook for 6 bucks.  It's not something you might need to do every day but for those times when you get caught it would be nice.  Break it in to 1$ for every half hour just to give some flexibility.  Don't charge tax or a service fee so it's a nice easy transaction. 

 


Very funny :smileyvery-happy: On the remote chance you are serious:

 

  • People will drive ten miles out of their way to "save" $0.10 per gallon on ten gallons of gasoline (hint: ignoring the wear & tear on your car and value of your time, it's still a losing proposition).  People are not going to pay for something that they think should be free.  Heck, they don't even want to pay for Nook apps.
  • Nook owners will just bring their charger and plug into the outlets in the cafe.
  • If you are going to charge for electricity, charge the students who come in and take over the cafe, buy one coffee, and then set and do homework for six hours.  At least they are quiet,

 

Of course, if you are not serious:

 

  • Have a lost and found, and charge for finding loose children.  Charge double if they are crying.
  • Charge for reading magazines.  After all, you charge Nook owners for those, and the ones that are laying around in the B&N store are less resaleable than the electronic versions.  Of course, you allow them to be lent just once to a friend ...

 

Keep those ideas coming !!!  We'll get B&N turned around in no time !!! :smileywink:

2 Nook HD/8GB + 2 Nook HD+/16GB: B&N 2.2.0 rooted
2 Nook Touch (one Ltd. Ed.): B&N 1.2.1 rooted; Dell Venue 8 Pro: Windows 8.1
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Mercury_Glitch
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Re: What does Nook need to do to survive?


DeanGibson wrote:

Mercury_Glitch wrote:
....

 

Charging kiosks, where you pay 'x' amount to charge your Nook for a given time.  And before anyone says 'you should let us charge it for free!' no.  That's something the drives the stores cost of operation up which puts more pressure to make money but in itself generates very little.  And I'm not saying charge high prices, maybe 2 dollars an hour.  That would let you fully charge your Nook for 6 bucks.  It's not something you might need to do every day but for those times when you get caught it would be nice.  Break it in to 1$ for every half hour just to give some flexibility.  Don't charge tax or a service fee so it's a nice easy transaction. 

 


Very funny :smileyvery-happy: On the remote chance you are serious:

 

  • People will drive ten miles out of their way to "save" $0.10 per gallon on ten gallons of gasoline (hint: ignoring the wear & tear on your car and value of your time, it's still a losing proposition).  People are not going to pay for something that they think should be free.  Heck, they don't even want to pay for Nook apps.
  • Nook owners will just bring their charger and plug into the outlets in the cafe.
  • If you are going to charge for electricity, charge the students who come in and take over the cafe, buy one coffee, and then set and do homework for six hours.  At least they are quiet,

 

Of course, if you are not serious:

 

  • Have a lost and found, and charge for finding loose children.  Charge double if they are crying.
  • Charge for reading magazines.  After all, you charge Nook owners for those, and the ones that are laying around in the B&N store are less resaleable than the electronic versions.  Of course, you allow them to be lent just once to a friend ...

 

Keep those ideas coming !!!  We'll get B&N turned around in no time !!! :smileywink:


 

My store has covered all the outlets to prevent the behavior of your last two points.  People were bringing laptops in and laying their power cables across half the cafe, and in the bookstore across several aisles.  It created a hazerdous environment just asking for someone to trip over one of the cables.  We get some complaints still, but those same people are always back in the store, just not with those pesky cables.  We also require that you have a cafe purchase from within a reasonable amount of time (I think it's about an hour or so, I don't work in our cafe). 

 

As to your first point, people still ask to let us charge their cell phones, tablets, laptops, etc.  If it's an emergency and they aren't rude the managers will generally allow them to charge cell phones.  I'm fairly sure there is a market there even if it's small. 

 

 

And trust me, if we could charge people when they damage a magazine by reading it in the cafe and then spilling coffee on it or tearing the cover I'm sure we would.  Likewise for the books that this happens to, which is a bit more rare.  However if you ever happened across a mass market with a broken spine you can thank a customer who decided to read the book in the store and and save their spot by splaying the book out open and page down. 

 

I don't imagine the kiosk would make a ton of money, but it costs nothing once it's installed. 

The Wheel weaves as the Wheel wills, and we are only the thread of the Pattern.
flyingtoastr
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Re: What does Nook need to do to survive?

[ Edited ]

Last year Sony announced that they were developing "authenticating" power outlets that would only pass juice to a signed device - i.e. your store's vaccuum cleaner will work fine, but if someone wants to plug in their laptop they'll need to pay for a key. They were even doing it over NFC to make it nice and easy.

 

At my store we have power outlets on the structural pillars. The outlets are literally in the middle of the floor, and yet we still have people who feel that they have the right to sit down or, in really bad cases, drag our tables and block the isles so they can plug in their laptops and leech off our free WiFi. And then we get people with the gall to come complain that we don't have power outlets in convienient locations for them.

 

I memorably had a guy a couple years ago unplug one of our NOOK tables so that he could charge his laptop. He just reached under the table, popped the cord out, put in his laptop charger, and stood at the table on his laptop like he owned the place. When we told him that he wasn't permitted to do so, he of course made a scene and screamed about how terrible our customer service was, and told us that he was going to go to Amazon from now on. How Amazon is going to charge his laptop is byond me, but it shows just how awful some people can be.

 

It's a bookstore, not your personal office.

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Wulfraed
Posts: 946
Registered: ‎11-24-2012

Re: What does Nook need to do to survive?


Mercury_Glitch wrote:Charging kiosks, where you pay 'x' amount to charge your Nook for a given time.  And before anyone says 'you should let us charge it for free!' no.  That's something the drives the stores cost of operation up which puts more pressure to make money but in itself generates very little.  And I'm not saying charge high prices, maybe 2 dollars an hour.  That would let you fully charge your Nook for 6 bucks.  It's not something you might need to do every day but for those times when you get caught it would be nice.  Break it in to 1$ for every half hour just to give some flexibility.  Don't charge tax or a service fee so it's a nice easy transaction. 

 


You're going to have to do a massive change to my current local B&N store then...

 

The cafe area is loaded with tables adjacent to power outlets where folk come in with laptops and similar to study.

 

And given that local electric charges are about 15 cents per kWh, and a 1st Edition battery is rated for 4.6Wh, assuming a 50% efficient charger and rounding up makes 10Wh, or less than 2/10th of a penny for the electricity itself.  Why would I pay $2/hour for your charging station if I could pay $2.50 for a large cup of tea in the cafe and plug in to an outlet near my table. {Heck, I actually lifted the brass lid of a power outlet in my mall's main hallway, outside the B&N, and charge my laptop there... Security's only concern was the power cable -- they moved a side-table over to cover the outlet and my power cord -- no comment on my using a quarter to unscrew the cover to the outlet}

 

Baron Wulfraed
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Mercury_Glitch
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Re: What does Nook need to do to survive?


Wulfraed wrote:

Mercury_Glitch wrote:Charging kiosks, where you pay 'x' amount to charge your Nook for a given time.  And before anyone says 'you should let us charge it for free!' no.  That's something the drives the stores cost of operation up which puts more pressure to make money but in itself generates very little.  And I'm not saying charge high prices, maybe 2 dollars an hour.  That would let you fully charge your Nook for 6 bucks.  It's not something you might need to do every day but for those times when you get caught it would be nice.  Break it in to 1$ for every half hour just to give some flexibility.  Don't charge tax or a service fee so it's a nice easy transaction. 

 


You're going to have to do a massive change to my current local B&N store then...

 

The cafe area is loaded with tables adjacent to power outlets where folk come in with laptops and similar to study.

 

And given that local electric charges are about 15 cents per kWh, and a 1st Edition battery is rated for 4.6Wh, assuming a 50% efficient charger and rounding up makes 10Wh, or less than 2/10th of a penny for the electricity itself.  Why would I pay $2/hour for your charging station if I could pay $2.50 for a large cup of tea in the cafe and plug in to an outlet near my table. {Heck, I actually lifted the brass lid of a power outlet in my mall's main hallway, outside the B&N, and charge my laptop there... Security's only concern was the power cable -- they moved a side-table over to cover the outlet and my power cord -- no comment on my using a quarter to unscrew the cover to the outlet}

 


 

Adjust the price.

 

Stop giving out free electricity. 

 

The store has now become more profitable even if no one uses the kiosk.  The people who don't return likely bought a single coffee and sat all day at a table, preventing anyone else from using it.  The rest will be back, even if they grumble for a bit about the change. 

 

That means more cafe sales.  And no one using our electricity for their cell phones, their laptops, their tablets, etc. etc. 

 

And I am sure people will complain and try to get around it.  We had one guy use a fork to try and pry the cover off one of the outlets.  Mind you the fork was metal.  We asked that he leave. 

 

The Wheel weaves as the Wheel wills, and we are only the thread of the Pattern.
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deesy58
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Registered: ‎01-22-2012
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Re: What does Nook need to do to survive?


Mercury_Glitch wrote:

Wulfraed wrote:

Mercury_Glitch wrote:Charging kiosks, where you pay 'x' amount to charge your Nook for a given time.  And before anyone says 'you should let us charge it for free!' no.  That's something the drives the stores cost of operation up which puts more pressure to make money but in itself generates very little.  And I'm not saying charge high prices, maybe 2 dollars an hour.  That would let you fully charge your Nook for 6 bucks.  It's not something you might need to do every day but for those times when you get caught it would be nice.  Break it in to 1$ for every half hour just to give some flexibility.  Don't charge tax or a service fee so it's a nice easy transaction. 

 


You're going to have to do a massive change to my current local B&N store then...

 

The cafe area is loaded with tables adjacent to power outlets where folk come in with laptops and similar to study.

 

And given that local electric charges are about 15 cents per kWh, and a 1st Edition battery is rated for 4.6Wh, assuming a 50% efficient charger and rounding up makes 10Wh, or less than 2/10th of a penny for the electricity itself.  Why would I pay $2/hour for your charging station if I could pay $2.50 for a large cup of tea in the cafe and plug in to an outlet near my table. {Heck, I actually lifted the brass lid of a power outlet in my mall's main hallway, outside the B&N, and charge my laptop there... Security's only concern was the power cable -- they moved a side-table over to cover the outlet and my power cord -- no comment on my using a quarter to unscrew the cover to the outlet}

 


 

Adjust the price.

 

Stop giving out free electricity. 

 

The store has now become more profitable even if no one uses the kiosk.  The people who don't return likely bought a single coffee and sat all day at a table, preventing anyone else from using it.  The rest will be back, even if they grumble for a bit about the change. 

 

That means more cafe sales.  And no one using our electricity for their cell phones, their laptops, their tablets, etc. etc. 

 

And I am sure people will complain and try to get around it.  We had one guy use a fork to try and pry the cover off one of the outlets.  Mind you the fork was metal.  We asked that he leave. 

 


Give away the free electricity as long as the customers are really customers (not homeless people trying to stay warm).  The electricty is cheap -- really cheap, and B&N needs to retain all the customers it can.  It's hard to imagine a less expensive marketing tactic that would boost customer loyalty. 

 

It isn't a contest, it's a business!