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Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,653
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
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East of the Sun - Chapters 38 - end of the book. Please join in.

[ Edited ]

We only have a week from tomorrow til the end of July.
Since new threads hadn't been posted, I decided to start this thread.
I don't want to miss out on what everyone has to say about the last chapters.
Especially I wanted to have Julia join in and talk to us about these chapters.
This has been such a good read for me.
I have learned so much about this time through the character's eyes.

 

One thing I have to ask is about the expression "spending the penny".
When Rose is about to deliver and her water breaks, she uses this expression.
Did she think she had peed? Did she not know about the water breaking?
Or is it just an expression describing it? I loved the expression.

 

Another is "truth or flannel". Rose  uses this expression when talking to Viva.
It intrigued me with the impression it gave of flannel covering the truth.
What does everything think of this expression?

 

I am hoping Julia chimes in to enlighten us about if they are English expressions
or where they came from.

 

The one thing that I didn't expect is how Rose, Tor and Viva had bonded.
I didn't expect even at the middle of the book that they would bond.
I did think that Rose and Tor would maintain a friendship throughout their lives.
But I wasn't sure what would happen in that respect with Viva.
It was a nice twist for me that Rose and Tor were so close.
But that Viva was opening up to a close friendship with them was a pleasant surprise.

 

Well enough of my thoughts for now.
Please join in so I can learn more about the book from your experiences.
Luanne

Message Edited by pen21 on 07-23-2009 10:33 PM
Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
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Re: East of the Sun - Chapters 38 - end of the book. Please join in.

It's fascinating that you pick up on expressions that are so common here and we use without thinking. Yes, 'spend a penny,' was a very commonplace euphemism for peeing-  a penny being  the price you had to pay in a public convenience. Is there an equivalent in the U.S. ? Rose has not been informed about waters breaking, poor girl.
Flannel means being disingenuous and sort of padding  the truth with a convenient lie.  I have no idea where the expression comes from. 
I was pleased when Viva got closer to 'Tor and Rose.    After being for so long dependent on the kindness of strangers, she had become defensive, they help her see that when you are at your most vulnerable a good friend will not let you down. pen21 wrote: 

We only have a week from tomorrow til the end of July.
Since new threads hadn't been posted, I decided to start this thread.
I don't want to miss out on what everyone has to say about the last chapters.
Especially I wanted to have Julia join in and talk to us about these chapters.
This has been such a good read for me.
I have learned so much about this time through the character's eyes.

 

One thing I have to ask is about the expression "spending the penny".
When Rose is about to deliver and her water breaks, she uses this expression.
Did she think she had peed? Did she not know about the water breaking?
Or is it just an expression describing it? I loved the expression.

 

Another is "truth or flannel". Rose  uses this expression when talking to Viva.
It intrigued me with the impression it gave of flannel covering the truth.
What does everything think of this expression?

 

I am hoping Julia chimes in to enlighten us about if they are English expressions
or where they came from.

 

The one thing that I didn't expect is how Rose, Tor and Viva had bonded.
I didn't expect even at the middle of the book that they would bond.
I did think that Rose and Tor would maintain a friendship throughout their lives.
But I wasn't sure what would happen in that respect with Viva.
It was a nice twist for me that Rose and Tor were so close.
But that Viva was opening up to a close friendship with them was a pleasant surprise.

 

Well enough of my thoughts for now.
Please join in so I can learn more about the book from your experiences.
Luanne

Message Edited by pen21 on 07-23-2009 10:33 PM

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,653
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
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Re: East of the Sun - Chapters 38 - end of the book. Please join in.

I always enjoy reading and finding new expressions that are used in different countries/cultures. These 2 expressions were new to me and fit very well in the scenes.

Some of the expressions used in the book were familiar to me, but they set the atmosphere for the book. I can't imagine the book without them.

 

I'm hoping everyone isn't on vacations. I haven't seen a lot of posting.

Julia, how long are you with us?

I hope you have your enjoyed your time with us as much as I have enjoyed your book.

Luanne

 

 

Julia wrote:

It's fascinating that you pick up on expressions that are so common here and we use without thinking. Yes, 'spend a penny,' was a very commonplace euphemism for peeing-  a penny being  the price you had to pay in a public convenience. Is there an equivalent in the U.S. ? Rose has not been informed about waters breaking, poor girl.
Flannel means being disingenuous and sort of padding  the truth with a convenient lie.  I have no idea where the expression comes from. 
I was pleased when Viva got closer to 'Tor and Rose.    After being for so long dependent on the kindness of strangers, she had become defensive, they help her see that when you are at your most vulnerable a good friend will not let you down.
Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,653
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
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Re: East of the Sun - Chapters 38 - end of the book. Please join in.

I liked the way Rose and Jack were at the end of the book.

Rose and the baby off to England to visit family.

Jack on his own coming to visit Rose's friends.

Their marriage is has seen a lot of turmoil, not just with Sunita.

But with two young people growing up.

I think being away from England in India also adds turmoil to anyone's life.

They had so many things external pressures affecting their marriage.

I like that the book left it open for me to decide if they would make a go of it.

Luanne

Wordsmith
Fozzie
Posts: 2,404
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: East of the Sun - Chapters 38 - end of the book. Please join in.

I finished the book and found it to be very enjoyable, full of serious issues, but presented in a way so as not to give the book a burdensome feeling.

 

I consider the ending to be a happy one.  I think all the couples will thrive in their relationships, but, maybe more importantly, the relationships between the couples will be just as important as the relationships between the members of each couple.  They have all come to know each other and have become a family of sorts.

 

I, too, enjoyed reading some of the English expressions I was not familiar with.

 

One of my favorite quotes appeared on page 406:

 

It's all about finding diamonds and pearls on your travels and coming back a richer person, but if anything, being in India is going to make me feel much poorer, because if I hadn't come, I wouldn't know how wonderful life can be.

 

Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,653
Registered: ‎03-23-2009

Re: East of the Sun - Chapters 38 - end of the book. Please join in.

I agree with your feelings at the end of the book. Especially that 'the relationships between the couples will be just as important as the relationships between the members of each couple.'

That Viva and Tor's husband were both writers and were able to create a relationship based on the writing, gave Viva a different view of him. Viva had not been encouraging when they got married and I had to agree with her opinion that it was happening very fast. But Tor has found a good match.

Luanne

 


Fozzie wrote:

I finished the book and found it to be very enjoyable, full of serious issues, but presented in a way so as not to give the book a burdensome feeling.

 

I consider the ending to be a happy one.  I think all the couples will thrive in their relationships, but, maybe more importantly, the relationships between the couples will be just as important as the relationships between the members of each couple.  They have all come to know each other and have become a family of sorts.

 

I, too, enjoyed reading some of the English expressions I was not familiar with.

 

One of my favorite quotes appeared on page 406:

 

It's all about finding diamonds and pearls on your travels and coming back a richer person, but if anything, being in India is going to make me feel much poorer, because if I hadn't come, I wouldn't know how wonderful life can be.

 


 

 
Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
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Re: East of the Sun - Chapters 38 - end of the book. Please join in.

My time with you ends at the end of July, but I must tell you first how much I've enjoyed my time with you.  It's been a new experience for me blogging like this, and I've got a lot out of your intelligent and often witty posts, so thank you so much. 

Regarding your last question about the themes of East of the Sun. My aim initially was to get into the skin of three girls taking this adventure together, the themes, accurately described by you, sort of  emerged as the book progressed. I think it was E.L. Docktorow who said that writing a novel , for him, is like " driving at night with the headlights on,' often as you're writing it, more and more gets revealed.  This is how I write.  I've tried a more logical approach, that is: carefully story boarding my ideas for a book, but that turned out to be too sterile and didn't work for me.

 

 

 

Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
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Re: East of the Sun - Chapters 38 - end of the book. Please join in.

I still think about Rose and Jack, and am tempted to follow their stories in another book.  The characters have stayed with me. J.G.
pen21 wrote:

I liked the way Rose and Jack were at the end of the book.

Rose and the baby off to England to visit family.

Jack on his own coming to visit Rose's friends.

Their marriage is has seen a lot of turmoil, not just with Sunita.

But with two young people growing up.

I think being away from England in India also adds turmoil to anyone's life.

They had so many things external pressures affecting their marriage.

I like that the book left it open for me to decide if they would make a go of it.

Luanne


 

Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
0 Kudos

Re: East of the Sun - Chapters 38 - end of the book. Please join in.

It's interesting that you say you enjoyed unfamiliar expressions.  At certain points in the editing process , I was asked to take out phrases that might be unfamiliar to U.S. readers, but argued that I, like you, love hearing new ways of saying things.  I particularly enjoyed 'The Poison wood Bible,' for its Southern expressions. JG
Fozzie wrote:

I finished the book and found it to be very enjoyable, full of serious issues, but presented in a way so as not to give the book a burdensome feeling.

 

I consider the ending to be a happy one.  I think all the couples will thrive in their relationships, but, maybe more importantly, the relationships between the couples will be just as important as the relationships between the members of each couple.  They have all come to know each other and have become a family of sorts.

 

I, too, enjoyed reading some of the English expressions I was not familiar with.

 

One of my favorite quotes appeared on page 406:

 

It's all about finding diamonds and pearls on your travels and coming back a richer person, but if anything, being in India is going to make me feel much poorer, because if I hadn't come, I wouldn't know how wonderful life can be.

 



Fozzie wrote:

I finished the book and found it to be very enjoyable, full of serious issues, but presented in a way so as not to give the book a burdensome feeling.

 

I consider the ending to be a happy one.  I think all the couples will thrive in their relationships, but, maybe more importantly, the relationships between the couples will be just as important as the relationships between the members of each couple.  They have all come to know each other and have become a family of sorts.

 

I, too, enjoyed reading some of the English expressions I was not familiar with.

 

One of my favorite quotes appeared on page 406:

 

It's all about finding diamonds and pearls on your travels and coming back a richer person, but if anything, being in India is going to make me feel much poorer, because if I hadn't come, I wouldn't know how wonderful life can be.