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Distinguished Correspondent
Thayer
Posts: 195
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: 1-20 Guy


CathyB wrote:

Julia_Gregson wrote:

All it is, is a clue as to why they are there. See P. 5.

Yes, you're right, we English are completely obsessed by tea.  My husband was a tea taster and mixes up three blends of loose tea  to get the perfect cup.

I give the recipe here:

Take one third Jasmine tea

one third Earl Grey,

One third Assam.

 

get a piece of newspaper, dump the tea on it, and  mix the teas  together with your hands.  One teaspoon per person (some say one for the pot) add boiling water, and let steep for four minutes.  Divine, the day for me can't start without it.  

Julia 


Julia:

 

   I love tea and would love to learn how to make my own blends. I recently purchased a small book that I thought would teach me - it had a few 'recipes'. My officemate is from India, her mother makes a chai blend that she took in for me and gave me the recipe - I have yet to make it myself as I need to finish all the tea I have before making anymore purchases. Like books, tea is another obsession of mine.

 


Julia,

 

I am from the deep south and down here we drink sweet iced tea, which is intolerable, and practically a non-entity in the northern states. My grandmother always added a sprig of fresh mint. Very refreshing when the mercury consistently reaches over 100 degrees this time of year.  

 

 

Dawn
~~Dawn
Live the life you love ~ Love the life you live.
Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,653
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
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Tea recipe

I was wondering what type of Jasmine tea you use.

I visited my tea store and they had Jasmine Oolong and Jasmine Dragon Phoenix Pearls Scented Green Tea. They thought the Jasmine Oolong would be a good choice.

Let me know what type of Jasmine tea you use.

Thanks for the help

Luanne


Julia wrote

Take one third Jasmine tea

one third Earl Grey,

One third Assam.

 

Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Tea recipe

Our tea is simply called Black Jasmine Tea.   We had quite a job finding it, but tracked it down at a specialist tea shop near us in Bath. I think Jasmine Oolong sounds good .
pen21 wrote:

I was wondering what type of Jasmine tea you use.

I visited my tea store and they had Jasmine Oolong and Jasmine Dragon Phoenix Pearls Scented Green Tea. They thought the Jasmine Oolong would be a good choice.

Let me know what type of Jasmine tea you use.

Thanks for the help

Luanne


Julia wrote

Take one third Jasmine tea

one third Earl Grey,

One third Assam.

 


 

Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,653
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Tea recipe

Thank you for the information. I now can ask better questions when I go to the tea shop. There is so much to learn, but it is so fun when I get to try the different teas. I am very much a novice and appreciate the advice.

Luanne


Julia_Gregson wrote:
Our tea is simply called Black Jasmine Tea.   We had quite a job finding it, but tracked it down at a specialist tea shop near us in Bath. I think Jasmine Oolong sounds good .
pen21 wrote:

I was wondering what type of Jasmine tea you use.

I visited my tea store and they had Jasmine Oolong and Jasmine Dragon Phoenix Pearls Scented Green Tea. They thought the Jasmine Oolong would be a good choice.

Let me know what type of Jasmine tea you use.

Thanks for the help

Luanne


Julia wrote

Take one third Jasmine tea

one third Earl Grey,

One third Assam.

 


 


 

 
Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Tea recipe

Good luck- you'll never go back to the tea bag again, or perhaps you never went there ! j
pen21 wrote:

Thank you for the information. I now can ask better questions when I go to the tea shop. There is so much to learn, but it is so fun when I get to try the different teas. I am very much a novice and appreciate the advice.

Luanne


Julia_Gregson wrote:
Our tea is simply called Black Jasmine Tea.   We had quite a job finding it, but tracked it down at a specialist tea shop near us in Bath. I think Jasmine Oolong sounds good .
pen21 wrote:

I was wondering what type of Jasmine tea you use.

I visited my tea store and they had Jasmine Oolong and Jasmine Dragon Phoenix Pearls Scented Green Tea. They thought the Jasmine Oolong would be a good choice.

Let me know what type of Jasmine tea you use.

Thanks for the help

Luanne


Julia wrote

Take one third Jasmine tea

one third Earl Grey,

One third Assam.

 


 


 

 

 

Inspired Wordsmith
CathyB
Posts: 271
Registered: ‎12-30-2006

Re: Tea recipe

So true! I work with an individual who would never use a tea bag - he is Indian and grew up in England. Not only does he say the tea tastes better when loose - I agree - but also says that you don't know what is in the tea bag (crushed into a powder, the dregs, etc...).

 

I drink loose tea now - still have a tea bag or too for when I go out - I bring my own tea to restaurants.

 


Julia_Gregson wrote:
Good luck- you'll never go back to the tea bag again, or perhaps you never went there ! j
pen21 wrote:

Thank you for the information. I now can ask better questions when I go to the tea shop. There is so much to learn, but it is so fun when I get to try the different teas. I am very much a novice and appreciate the advice.

Luanne


Julia_Gregson wrote:
Our tea is simply called Black Jasmine Tea.   We had quite a job finding it, but tracked it down at a specialist tea shop near us in Bath. I think Jasmine Oolong sounds good .
pen21 wrote:

I was wondering what type of Jasmine tea you use.

I visited my tea store and they had Jasmine Oolong and Jasmine Dragon Phoenix Pearls Scented Green Tea. They thought the Jasmine Oolong would be a good choice.

Let me know what type of Jasmine tea you use.

Thanks for the help

Luanne


Julia wrote

Take one third Jasmine tea

one third Earl Grey,

One third Assam.

 


 


 

 

 


 

 

Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
0 Kudos

Re: 1-20 Tor And Rose

I think 'Tor is more intelligent than she realises, although she is always protesting that she is thick.  I think she is hungry for experience, and that includes love and sex, but it's not, as you rightly point out, simply a hunger to be seized . (this is the twenties version of getting laid!)
vivico1 wrote:

You know, in a way, Rose and Tor remind me of so many girlfriend relationships growing up. One is the pretty one, everyone adores and one is the one who pretty much just has to tag along and often tries too hard but never gets a boyfriend. I remember a lot of these opposites relationships in high school and always wondered if the good looking girls picked the average or not so good looking girl as her best friend, so as to not have competition and because they were usually better listeners who didn't talk. But with Rose, I really feel she loves Tor and its genuine. I hope that remains true.

 

 

They are so different in how they see their families too, or how their families are. Tor has a mother from hell, who knows all the ways to hurt her feelings or make her feel "less than adequate", just a fat girl who can't do things and Tor really resents her for it. I don't blame her for wanting to get away. On the other hand, Rose has a loving family and home and its very hard for her to even think of leaving them. What a huge difference.

 

You know, on the back of the book, it says Tor is hellbent on losing her virginity on the trip before finding a husband. I don't see her that way on this trip. She just seems to really want to be loved by some man. This is not the same as just wanting to get laid. I really thought from the cover, that this Victoria was really going to be a real wild child looking for a good time. Well maybe she is a little wilder in some ways but I really don't see that she is out to lose her virginity as almost a quest. Good grief, there is not a female in the world who can't get laid if that's what she wants, she just has to be willing to give it to whoever wants it. I think she just wants to get away from home and stay away, I would want away from her mother too.


 

Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
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Re: 1-20 Guy

What is funny about the moaning bit, is that it was taken from real life.  When I was 17 years old and living in London for the first time, my mother insisted on staying in the flat with me for the first month.   One night, about three in the morning, I heard moaning from the flat upstairs. I woke my mother up and insisted she took care of the poor injured person.  When she refused, I thought, 'I hope I'm not that uncaring when I'm her age.' 
vivico1 wrote:

Guy is something isn't he? That sounds weird to say since that is my little brother's name lol. I am not sure what to make of him yet. It is sad that when Viva picks him up, there is no one saying goodbye to him, no one who seems to worry or care. They all seem ready to dump him on her. Is he really that bad, or just bad because of home life. We know in these chapters he has been in trouble for stealing, why is he stealing, need or just because he wants to? And he fights and drinks and oh boy does he keep himself "busy" at nights lol. Oh how that cracked me up when Tor was so worried about his "moaning" at night that she tells Rose about it and says it like she hears him do it! Then they ask Viva about it? LOL, oh my these girls are too young and naive to be going to another country, especially India at this time.

 

Hey, why is Guy's parents in India? Anyone catch that yet? If so but it is past chapter 20, don't say here, it might involve a spoiler, just wondering.


 

Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
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Re: 1-20 Viva and William

I agree: cold and manipulative. The kind of man who puts his socks on hangers. 
CathyB wrote:

I didn't like William - he seemed to be self-centered and didn't really care for Viva. He was kind of belittling where her opinions or wants were concerned.

 

I also agree that Rose really liked Tor. I didn't feel sorry for Rose when she had to back up Tor's stories of romance - I felt sorry for Tor that she felt the need to embellish them. Rose was a supportive friend.

 

Tor was desperate for love - she thought she needed it.

 

 


 

Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
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Re: East of the Sun: Early Chapters, 1 - 20

The none of us is free to choose line came from my belief, that the British middle and upper classes with their notions of how things should be done, were just as hide bound and class- ridden as the Indians with their arranged marriages and rigid caste system. 
Door knob secrets came from my sister who is a psychotherapist.  She says there is the moment when people are leaving a room where they blurt everything out.  Brilliant!
Fozzie wrote:

Here are some of my miscellaneous thoughts on the first 20 chapters, before reading the comments by others:

 

I found myself puzzled by the fact that Paul reacted so strongly and so negatively to Tor's kiss (pgs. 69-71).  The only explanation I have been able to come up with is that he is gay.

 

I was struck by Jack's thought that None of us is free to choose (pg. 109).  It makes me wonder how free to choose Tor, Rose, Jack, Frank, Guy, and Viva will be?  My guess is not as free to choose as they would hope.

 

I think Frank is experiencing guilt over being relieved at his brother's death, as expressed on page 139.  I am curious to see if Frank continues in the medical profession, one he seemingly chose, but did he do so out of guilt?  That brings me back to the None of us is free to choose quote.

 

I couldn't help but be reminded of Elaine from the TV show Seinfeld when I read about Rose trying to use the contraceptive sponge that the doctor gave her (pg. 152).  I hope this comment isn't lost on you, Julia.  I don't know if the TV show Seinfeld was shown in the UK.

 

I noticed another clever expression on page 169 --- doorknob secrets.  Did you make this expression up too, Julia?

 


 

Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
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Re: East of the Sun: Early Chapters, 1 - 20

Can't comment on the healthy love relationship without a spoiler! However, the book certainly is a celebration of friendship between women.  I always think that the notion that women are really bitchy to each other is quite wrong. In my experience, women are often wonderfully generous to each other, great confidence givers and  friends. Obviously one gets it wrong occasionally, but that's life.   Do you agree ?
Fozzie wrote:

 

What are the early impressions you get of love relationships in the novel?

 

There doesn't seem to be one healthy love relationship in the novel, except the friendship love between Tor and Rose.

 

Do you immediately have a favorite character? If so, who is it and why?

 

I do not have a favorite character.  Certainly Tor, Rose, and Viva are at the forefront, but I couldn't pick just one.

 

What is your impression of being young in the late 1920s from the picture we get here?

 

The young people are naive and no one tells them anything.  There don't seem to be too many sources of information either.  However, it is all relative compared to today, when almost too much information is readily available via the internet.  I get information overload!

 

How would you describe Guy?

 

I think I am most worried about Guy.  We seem to know the least about him and I am worried what will become of him in India.

 


 

Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
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Re: East of the Sun: Early Chapters, 1 - 20

I forgot to ask you to explain the Seinfeld sponge ?  I know who he is (very funny). We get his show over here, but am not a regular watcher. We watch the Daley Show.
Fozzie wrote:

Here are some of my miscellaneous thoughts on the first 20 chapters, before reading the comments by others:

 

I found myself puzzled by the fact that Paul reacted so strongly and so negatively to Tor's kiss (pgs. 69-71).  The only explanation I have been able to come up with is that he is gay.

 

I was struck by Jack's thought that None of us is free to choose (pg. 109).  It makes me wonder how free to choose Tor, Rose, Jack, Frank, Guy, and Viva will be?  My guess is not as free to choose as they would hope.

 

I think Frank is experiencing guilt over being relieved at his brother's death, as expressed on page 139.  I am curious to see if Frank continues in the medical profession, one he seemingly chose, but did he do so out of guilt?  That brings me back to the None of us is free to choose quote.

 

I couldn't help but be reminded of Elaine from the TV show Seinfeld when I read about Rose trying to use the contraceptive sponge that the doctor gave her (pg. 152).  I hope this comment isn't lost on you, Julia.  I don't know if the TV show Seinfeld was shown in the UK.

 

I noticed another clever expression on page 169 --- doorknob secrets.  Did you make this expression up too, Julia?

 


 

Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
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Re: East of the Sun: Early Chapters, 1 - 20

I was very interested by this post.  I do agree that the women of this time all to a greater or lesser extent were neglected compared to the young women of today.  However,  would one rather be brought up with benign neglect, or have too much expected of you ? I'm very struck by how disappointing life could be for a young woman of today after being well educated and told that the sky is the limit to find that life really doesn't always give you what you want.  What think you?
eadieburke wrote:
 

What are the early impressions you get of love relationships in the novel?

 

It seems to me that in the 1920's a love relationship was a "hit or miss" experience. In East of the Sun, you have Rose who is traveling back to India to marry a cavalry officer she has only met a handful of times. She hardly can even remember what he looks like but she is hell bent on marrying him. It seems a lot of women in the 1920's were just afraid of never marrying and so just settled on the first guy they met and lived with the consequences of an unhappy marriage for the rest of their lives.

 

Do you immediately have a favorite character? If so, who is it and why?

 

My favorite character is Viva. All throughout the novel, she overcame a lot of difficult experiences and seemed to grow from each one right before the readers eyes. She managed to acquire the courage needed to pull through a lot of situations that looked very doomed.

 

What is your impression of being young in the late 1920s from the picture we get here?

 

Being young in the 1920's seemed a bit overwhelming to me. I really felt sorry for Rose and her fear of marrying someone she hardly knew. I could also feel for Tor because of her weight problem she seemed desperate for a relationship and seemed to settle for just anyone. Viva seemed so lonesome with her parents gone at such an early age. She needed a lot of inner strength to just make it day by day.

 

In what ways are the people in this young group blind to what they are getting themselves into?

 

The three young women in the story are really blinded by the 1920's society that never discussed sexuality in the open. Here is Rose who has no clue about how to use her birth control device and has no one to turn to because her friends are just as clueless. Tor has very low self-esteem and goes from one seedy character to the next. Poor Viva has no family to help her and doesn't have an idea about the responsibility of being in charge of other young people on this trip to India. Guy's parents continue to blame Viva for their son's bad behavior and he is never held responsible for himself.

 

 


 

Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
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Re: 1-20 Viva and William

I thought about my mother a lot when I wrote the character of Viva.  My mother was brave and virtually had to bring herself up.  I remember her telling me that she had made a decision about life when she was about eighteen. She'd been very unhappy as a child and knew what that felt like, but from now on she was going to strive to be happy.  I know that sounds simplistic, but I admired her for it.  She had every excuse to be a disfunctional parent but never was. It made me realise there is such a thing as inner strength which doesn't always depend on having a lucky family. Do you agree ?
vivico1 wrote:

Viva is an interesting character. She seems to be hiding a lot. I wonder what or why? And why is she so secretive about how her family died? I like that she is taking her life into her own hands and going to do something for herself. It seems she may not have always been that way. She had to depend on William when she was young and got back to England and from what I am reading here, all that did was give him a way into her bed. She is really taking a chance to go as a chaperone at this age with these three not much younger, to get to India but she seems driven, considering she has her own place now, she has a job and a boss she likes and is pursuing her writing career. I have a feeling something from her past is pursuing her and pushing her to go on this trip. I don't know if William really cares or just doesn't want to lose his "ward" and mistress. He seems like a louse to me for that.

 

I am getting a feeling this book is going to have a lot to do with how women were treated in this time period in these places, and how they perceived themselves too. The men may secondary in a way to telling that story of these women/girls. Anyone else feel the same way?


 

Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
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Re: Tea recipe

My husband- ex tea taster- also turns his nose up at the tea bag and  says that it can be a dumping ground for the less good tea.  Also, I like the ritual of heating the pot and measuring the tea and letting it steep.  
CathyB wrote:

So true! I work with an individual who would never use a tea bag - he is Indian and grew up in England. Not only does he say the tea tastes better when loose - I agree - but also says that you don't know what is in the tea bag (crushed into a powder, the dregs, etc...).

 

I drink loose tea now - still have a tea bag or too for when I go out - I bring my own tea to restaurants.

 


Julia_Gregson wrote:
Good luck- you'll never go back to the tea bag again, or perhaps you never went there ! j
pen21 wrote:

Thank you for the information. I now can ask better questions when I go to the tea shop. There is so much to learn, but it is so fun when I get to try the different teas. I am very much a novice and appreciate the advice.

Luanne


Julia_Gregson wrote:
Our tea is simply called Black Jasmine Tea.   We had quite a job finding it, but tracked it down at a specialist tea shop near us in Bath. I think Jasmine Oolong sounds good .
pen21 wrote:

I was wondering what type of Jasmine tea you use.

I visited my tea store and they had Jasmine Oolong and Jasmine Dragon Phoenix Pearls Scented Green Tea. They thought the Jasmine Oolong would be a good choice.

Let me know what type of Jasmine tea you use.

Thanks for the help

Luanne


Julia wrote

Take one third Jasmine tea

one third Earl Grey,

One third Assam.

 


 


 

 

 


 

 


 

Scribe
vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: 1-20 Viva and William

There has to be such a thing as inner strength or I think I would be in jail or dead today! My family was dysfunctional before there was the word! We were nothing more than people sharing a house. There was no bonding, as a result, things were done to me by several members, that should not be done to any child ever. Then there was torture, actual physical torture used to keep me from talking. Yet at school, I was not the child who coward away from things, or was shy or you would think anything was wrong with. My first grade teacher wrote on her report about me to my mother, Vivian is the most well adjusted child of her age I have seen. I since told my psychiatrist about that and told her, it wasn't that I was the most well adjusted child, I was the most well adaptive child! She said, I have to agree with you there, you adapted to your environment to survive it. In junior high, one day I told one of my teachers who my older brother was. She said YOU ARE KIDDING! She had had him 4 years before. She called in the teacher in the connecting room and said do you know who Vivian's older brother is? She told her and the same YOU ARE KIDDING! lol. They said, do you have a different mother, or a different father. I said no. (Turns out I did have a different father than the rest but did not find this out until a few years later.) Anyway, so I knew then that my older brother...and sister had been terrors to them too so I never told anyone again who my siblings were because I did not want to be judged as one of them before I was judged for myself. These two teachers had both had me in their class a full year before I told them.

 

I think two things kept me alive and sane and not become what those who victimized me were: a strong inner strength, and a loving Heavenly Father who never would have wanted any child to go through what I did, but after all, Life does happen so he is there for any of us, heck he is there WITH all of us, we need only look for him and some how even as a very young child I knew this and knew he did not mean any family to be as my family was. This too is why I watched my family and knew they were different, this was not normal. Then I wanted to understand why people do what they do. I wanted some way to study it. When I reached about 4 grade, maybe 5th and heard the term Psychology for the first time, read about it, I knew what I wanted to be when I grew up. That never changed and that is what my degree is in. You know, I tend to agree with your mother. I think unless mentally impaired, so that the ability to know is gone, I believe being happy is a choice too. I do not mean you have to be happy in an unhealthy situation, like I was not happy with what was happening to me, but I do believe that as adults, we can chose to be happy, or we can chose to be miserable, and some people are even happy being miserable, so they will never change!

 


Julia_Gregson wrote:
I thought about my mother a lot when I wrote the character of Viva. My mother was brave and virtually had to bring herself up. I remember her telling me that she had made a decision about life when she was about eighteen. She'd been very unhappy as a child and knew what that felt like, but from now on she was going to strive to be happy. I know that sounds simplistic, but I admired her for it. She had every excuse to be a disfunctional parent but never was. It made me realise there is such a thing as inner strength which doesn't always depend on having a lucky family. Do you agree ?

that story of these women/girls. Anyone else feel the same way?


 


 

 

Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
0 Kudos

Re: 1-20 Guy

You're absolutely right! Tea is an essential tool in problem solving. 
Fozzie wrote:

I have yet another interpretation.  It ties to the book, but I think requires knowing a bit about the British people.  I lived in England for 18 months, and experienced first hand how people in England like their tea.  When I had a baby in the hospital, there was a special tea cart that went around to the rooms in the hospital a couple of times a day.  I don't think I entered a home in England without being offered tea.  Everyone had an electric kettle but me. 

 

Anyway, back to what Julia meant, or what I think anyway.  She means she has to make tea because that's what all Englash people do when anything goes wrong.  They stall, put on some tea, drink it, and then deal with the issue at hand.

 

I think it was Tor who referred to her mother doing this type of thing in the book.  I didn't mark the passage, but Tor was reflecting on some crisis and thougth about how her mother did not deal with it directly, but did as she always did --- put on a pot of tea.

 


pen21 wrote:

 

OK, I think I know what it could be if the clue is about Guy's parents.

Otherwise I was thinking the post from Julia was a clue to what we could expect later in the book. I didn't think the clue post from Julia was an answer to a question.

This is fun.:smileyvery-happy:


vivico1 wrote:

what? lol, what post is this about Julia? Is this maybe a clue to why Guy's parents are in India? That was one of the most recent questions. If so, ahhhhh I get it, I know why they were there then but I won't say at this point in the book then. If its not about that, I don't know what you mean lol.

 


Julia_Gregson wrote:
A clue: put the kettle on.Julia

 

 


 

 

 


 

Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
0 Kudos

Re: 1-20 Viva and William

That's an amazing and inspiring post.  I think that is the true triumph of a life- to rise above .  That's an interesting distinction too about the adaptive child. It must have shown early signs of emotional intelligence even if it was at a price. What courses are you doing? 
 

vivico1 wrote:

There has to be such a thing as inner strength or I think I would be in jail or dead today! My family was dysfunctional before there was the word! We were nothing more than people sharing a house. There was no bonding, as a result, things were done to me by several members, that should not be done to any child ever. Then there was torture, actual physical torture used to keep me from talking. Yet at school, I was not the child who coward away from things, or was shy or you would think anything was wrong with. My first grade teacher wrote on her report about me to my mother, Vivian is the most well adjusted child of her age I have seen. I since told my psychiatrist about that and told her, it wasn't that I was the most well adjusted child, I was the most well adaptive child! She said, I have to agree with you there, you adapted to your environment to survive it. In junior high, one day I told one of my teachers who my older brother was. She said YOU ARE KIDDING! She had had him 4 years before. She called in the teacher in the connecting room and said do you know who Vivian's older brother is? She told her and the same YOU ARE KIDDING! lol. They said, do you have a different mother, or a different father. I said no. (Turns out I did have a different father than the rest but did not find this out until a few years later.) Anyway, so I knew then that my older brother...and sister had been terrors to them too so I never told anyone again who my siblings were because I did not want to be judged as one of them before I was judged for myself. These two teachers had both had me in their class a full year before I told them.

 

I think two things kept me alive and sane and not become what those who victimized me were: a strong inner strength, and a loving Heavenly Father who never would have wanted any child to go through what I did, but after all, Life does happen so he is there for any of us, heck he is there WITH all of us, we need only look for him and some how even as a very young child I knew this and knew he did not mean any family to be as my family was. This too is why I watched my family and knew they were different, this was not normal. Then I wanted to understand why people do what they do. I wanted some way to study it. When I reached about 4 grade, maybe 5th and heard the term Psychology for the first time, read about it, I knew what I wanted to be when I grew up. That never changed and that is what my degree is in. You know, I tend to agree with your mother. I think unless mentally impaired, so that the ability to know is gone, I believe being happy is a choice too. I do not mean you have to be happy in an unhealthy situation, like I was not happy with what was happening to me, but I do believe that as adults, we can chose to be happy, or we can chose to be miserable, and some people are even happy being miserable, so they will never change!

 


Julia_Gregson wrote:
I thought about my mother a lot when I wrote the character of Viva. My mother was brave and virtually had to bring herself up. I remember her telling me that she had made a decision about life when she was about eighteen. She'd been very unhappy as a child and knew what that felt like, but from now on she was going to strive to be happy. I know that sounds simplistic, but I admired her for it. She had every excuse to be a disfunctional parent but never was. It made me realise there is such a thing as inner strength which doesn't always depend on having a lucky family. Do you agree ?

that story of these women/girls. Anyone else feel the same way?


 


 

 


 

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pen21
Posts: 3,653
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
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Re: Tea recipe

 To me the experience of making the tea with loose leaf adds to the ceremony. It is a form of relaxing for me before I even sit and drink the tea. My son was in Japan while in the military and bought me a tea set in Japan and explained the ceremony they have, which I think has led me to this view. Tea is not just a beverage, it is the whole experience. Loose leaf does make a difference and the taste is so much better than the tea bags.

Luanne

 


Julia_Gregson wrote:
My husband- ex tea taster- also turns his nose up at the tea bag and  says that it can be a dumping ground for the less good tea.  Also, I like the ritual of heating the pot and measuring the tea and letting it steep.  
CathyB wrote:

So true! I work with an individual who would never use a tea bag - he is Indian and grew up in England. Not only does he say the tea tastes better when loose - I agree - but also says that you don't know what is in the tea bag (crushed into a powder, the dregs, etc...).

 

I drink loose tea now - still have a tea bag or too for when I go out - I bring my own tea to restaurants.

 


Julia_Gregson wrote:
Good luck- you'll never go back to the tea bag again, or perhaps you never went there ! j
pen21 wrote:

Thank you for the information. I now can ask better questions when I go to the tea shop. There is so much to learn, but it is so fun when I get to try the different teas. I am very much a novice and appreciate the advice.

Luanne

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Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
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Re: 1-20 Viva and William

Agreed. I think once you've experienced the fear of poverty it stays a real presence in your life.  Tor and Rose haven't  been through that.