Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Moderator
Rachel-K
Posts: 1,495
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

East of the Sun, Middle Chapters: Guy

What is Guy's relationship with his parents like? Do they know about his condition? What do you make of their refusal to pay Viva?

 

The novel is set at a time when there is little popular understanding of mental illness. How do the people around Guy understand his behavior?

 

Is Guy capable of choosing what he does? Do you think he's planning out his actions? What do you expect from him?

 

Is there any (even illogical) reasoning behind his choosing Viva as an obsession?

Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
0 Kudos

Re: East of the Sun, Middle Chapters: Guy

I've met some varieties of Guy in my time, victims of the English public school system whose parents have mostly lived abroad.  These boys do become sort of permanent defensive guests, unless they learn to truly survive on their own. 
rkubie wrote:

What is Guy's relationship with his parents like? Do they know about his condition? What do you make of their refusal to pay Viva?

 

The novel is set at a time when there is little popular understanding of mental illness. How do the people around Guy understand his behavior?

 

Is Guy capable of choosing what he does? Do you think he's planning out his actions? What do you expect from him?

 

Is there any (even illogical) reasoning behind his choosing Viva as an obsession?


 

Wordsmith
Fozzie
Posts: 2,404
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: East of the Sun, Middle Chapters: Guy


rkubie wrote:

Is there any (even illogical) reasoning behind his choosing Viva as an obsession?


I think he chose Viva as his obsession because to him she represents his journey away from his unpleasant life in boarding school.  She represents a transition in his life.  Maybe in his mind, she provides him a segway to become what he has wanted or wished to become.

Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
0 Kudos

Re: East of the Sun, Middle Chapters: Guy

I think she also becomes a kind of Mummy substitute, he is so lost and rudderless. She's also attractive so ...

Fozzie wrote:

rkubie wrote:

Is there any (even illogical) reasoning behind his choosing Viva as an obsession?


I think he chose Viva as his obsession because to him she represents his journey away from his unpleasant life in boarding school.  She represents a transition in his life.  Maybe in his mind, she provides him a segway to become what he has wanted or wished to become.