Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Moderator
Rachel-K
Posts: 1,495
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

First Impressions - The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen

[ Edited ]
How do you like reading Austen's voice, here? Do you feel as if you've been let into her private world?

Have you ever wondered what she must have been like, as Syrie says she did? (Or are you new to Jane Austen?)

Message Edited by Jessica on 01-31-2008 04:07 PM
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: First Impressions



rkubie wrote:
How do you like reading Austen's voice, here? Do you feel as if you've been let into her private world?

Have you ever wondered what she must have been like, as Syrie says she did? (Or are you new to Jane Austen?)




Yes, I feel to read Jane Austen, is to wonder what she was like. Her stories were so magically domestic but yet sophiscatedly rich in the dept of each character. Her words seem to flow gently as if she was skipping along a path of smoothen sand. Always a jolly flow of dialect amongst the characters to keep the coffee warmed and constantly stirred. It is time for me to read Sense and Senseability again. Its been awhile. But all these wonderful tidbits that Syrie wrote, are great at wetting my appetitite again. And delving into Sense and Sensability once more for the 3rd or 4th time. I can't recall, just know when it gets alittle unfamiliar, reading it over I must.
Frequent Contributor
ELee
Posts: 418
Registered: ‎10-26-2006
0 Kudos

Tennyson's perspective

Alfred, Lord Tennyson, as quoted by his son Hallam in his memoir of his father, said

"Miss Austen understood the smallness of life to perfection. She was a great artist, equal in her small sphere to Shakespeare. I think "Persuasion" and "Mansfield Park" are my favourites. There is a saying that if God made the country, and man the town, the devil made the little country town. There is nothing equal to the smallness of a small town."
Author
SyrieJames
Posts: 36
Registered: ‎12-19-2007
0 Kudos

Anthony Trollope's perspective



ELee wrote:
Alfred, Lord Tennyson, as quoted by his son Hallam in his memoir of his father, said

"Miss Austen understood the smallness of life to perfection. She was a great artist, equal in her small sphere to Shakespeare. I think "Persuasion" and "Mansfield Park" are my favourites. There is a saying that if God made the country, and man the town, the devil made the little country town. There is nothing equal to the smallness of a small town."




Here's one of my favorite quotes about Jane Austen's work, by Anthony Trollope:

"Miss Austen was surely a great novelist. What she did, she did perfectly.... She wrote of the times in which she lived, of the class of people with which she associated, and in the language which was usual to her as an educated lady. Of romance—what we generally mean when we speak of romance—she had no tinge: heroes and heroines with wonderful adventures there are none in her novels. Of great criminals and hidden crimes she tells us nothing. But she places us in a circle of gentlemen and ladies, and charms us while she tells us with an unconscious accuracy how men should act to women, and women act to men. It is not that her people are all good; and, certainly, they are not all wise. The faults of some are the anvils on which the virtues of others are hammered till they are bright as steel. In the comedy of folly, I know no novelist who has beaten her. The letters of Mr. Collins, a clergyman in Pride and Prejudice, would move laughter in a low-church archbishop."

Anthony Trollope, 1870

Learn more about
The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen





Visit www.syriejames.com
Contributor
KristiGal09
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎01-29-2008
0 Kudos

Re: First Impressions

I would love to start reading Jane Austin! Her books seem to be so inspiring, and I would love it if somebody could reccomend a Jane Austin book to read. One with romance involved in the story! Thank you!
Frequent Contributor
LizzieAnn
Posts: 2,344
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: First Impressions

Kristi,

Definitely read Austen! Any of her novels are good, but my personal favorite & the one I tell everyone to read is Pride & Prejudice. This novel has been one of my all-time favorite novels ever for more years that I want to say. You'll love Lizzy & Darcy and the story is terrific.



KristiGal09 wrote:
I would love to start reading Jane Austin! Her books seem to be so inspiring, and I would love it if somebody could reccomend a Jane Austin book to read. One with romance involved in the story! Thank you!


Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon