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Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
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Hello dear Barnes & Noble Readers!

Hello dear Barnes & Noble Readers,

 

If anybody had told me, say two years ago, that I would be sitting down today to discuss East of the Sun with you, I would have thrown my hat in the air and shouted how balloon!  You see, not so very long ago the thought of publishing a novel, felt like an impossible dream for me, and the best part about it is having intelligent and interested readers.

 

My book was originally titled ‘The Fishing Fleet.' This was the unkind name given to young English women who went to India during the time of the British Raj hoping to find a husband there.  (If you failed you were sent home a ‘Returned Empty'- nice hey?)  Now called East of the Sun, it tells the story of three young women who are en route to India in the autumn of 1928, each with a new life in mind.  Rose, a beautiful but naive bride-to-be, is about to marry a man she hardly knows. Victoria, her bridesmaid is thrilled to have left her ghastly mother, and is determined to find herself a husband.  Viva, their inexperienced chaperone, is in search of the India of her childhood, ghosts from her past and a new kind of freedom.

 

Although I live and work in Wales, I first went to India years ago as journalist to interview raped women there and to visit orphanages. I've been back twice since to do research for the book. I was also inspired by a woman called Mrs. Smith Parse, who I met when I was five and she was sixty.   She told me stories of elephant hunts and pony treks and snakes in the bath and was easily the most interesting grown-up I had ever met.  She was kind too, and principled. As I grew up, I came to resent on her behalf the old stereotype of the British Memsahib as snobbish, gin soaked and insular.  Some were monsters, most were not.

 

I can't wait to discuss the book with you.

 

 

 

Warm regards,

 

Julia Gregson

Wordsmith
Fozzie
Posts: 2,404
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Hello dear Barnes & Noble Readers!


Julia_Gregson wrote:

If anybody had told me, say two years ago, that I would be sitting down today to discuss East of the Sun with you, I would have thrown my hat in the air and shouted how balloon! 


I had not heard the expression "how balloon" before reading your book, and now you use it here!  Do you know the origin of it?  Have any other readers heard it before?

 

Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
Scribe
vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Hello dear Barnes & Noble Readers!

I have never heard it before, but I picture it being said with delight and it being kind of stretched out. When I saw Julia say it here, I said out loud...oh how ballooooonnnn! hehe. Now Julia, you must tell us about it and how to say it, drawn out or quick and kinda up at the end. :smileywink:

 


Fozzie wrote:

Julia_Gregson wrote:

If anybody had told me, say two years ago, that I would be sitting down today to discuss East of the Sun with you, I would have thrown my hat in the air and shouted how balloon!


I had not heard the expression "how balloon" before reading your book, and now you use it here! Do you know the origin of it? Have any other readers heard it before?

 


 

 

Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
Scribe
vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Hello dear Barnes & Noble Readers!

OK, i just read my last post and I must be tired, and thinking about the book, getting into it a bit much because I never in my life say....Now (anybody) You must tell us all about it! I think I must have just sat down on the boat with the girls for some "gup". hehehe.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,653
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
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Re: Hello dear Barnes & Noble Readers!

I love the posts on balloon. I thought it was a really fun expression in the book and it definitely described the mood at that moment. But I think the posts have taken it to a higher level. So I can't wait til I hear what Julia says about the history.

 

"gup" would be another one. Julia if you would also talk about that.

 

I need some fun expressions to pick up the mood at work.:smileyvery-happy:

 

pen21

Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009

Re: Hello dear Barnes & Noble Readers!

Dear Laura,

 

I made up the expression, 'how balloon,' I just thought it would have been the kind of secret language that 'Tor and Rose might have used.  I like it though, do you?

 

Julia  

Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
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Re: Hello dear Barnes & Noble Readers!

Dear Vivico,

 

I like to float the word out like a balloon!  

Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
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Re: Hello dear Barnes & Noble Readers!

Why wouldn't you say- 'you must tell us all about it' 

Is that an English way of expressing yourself, or does that simply sound too bossy for you.

Isn't gup a great word.?

Julia 

Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
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Re: Hello dear Barnes & Noble Readers!

 Maybe you need to take a large bottle of gin and it in and suggest a chotapeg around four in the afternoon.  If you want to have a really large one, suggest a burrapeg.

You might also try inserting the word wallah more into your conversations: for instance:

where is the post wallah today ?  or,  that drycleaner  wallah was rather rude I thought.

 

Julia 

Distinguished Bibliophile
pen21
Posts: 3,653
Registered: ‎03-23-2009
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Re: Hello dear Barnes & Noble Readers!

These are some great suggestion.

That was a nice touch to add some special words like balloon to the way Tor and Rose spoke to each other. It really described those moments in the book.

Hopefully I can pull off using a few new phrases too.

Luanne

 


Julia_Gregson wrote:

 Maybe you need to take a large bottle of gin and it in and suggest a chotapeg around four in the afternoon.  If you want to have a really large one, suggest a burrapeg.

You might also try inserting the word wallah more into your conversations: for instance:

where is the post wallah today ?  or,  that drycleaner  wallah was rather rude I thought.

 

Julia 


 

 

Scribe
vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Hello dear Barnes & Noble Readers!

Julia,

No, saying "now, you must tell us all about it" doesn't sound bossy, just not too often an American way of saying things. It sounds very English here lol. Here we might say, ok girl..GIVE! or ok, now you gotta tell me! lol same thing just different expressions. But it's those cultural expressions that make reading a book about somewhere else so fun! Gup sounds like a combination of gossip and gulp, like gossip that would make you gulp when you heard it! We could have a whole thread that is British to American English lol. I know, American English is probably an oxymoron huh hehe. :smileywink:

 

Also, if balloon is said like it is floating, then I got it right, its drawn out... ballooon, like a balloon floating off hehe.

 

And I do hope you will join in on our discussions on all the threads if you like. It is so much fun to have an author here who will talk to us, chat. Just don't tell us anything that is beyond the point of where we are talking until we all get through reading the book please. We warn each other all the time, no spoilers, or put **spoiler alert past chapter or page such and such** so we know whether to read it or not. So by asking you the same, that makes you one of the group too :smileyhappy: I have lots of questions but want to get some more people in here and going first. And I do need to finish the book lol.

 


Julia_Gregson wrote:

Why wouldn't you say- 'you must tell us all about it'

Is that an English way of expressing yourself, or does that simply sound too bossy for you.

Isn't gup a great word.?

Julia


 

 

Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
Inspired Wordsmith
CathyB
Posts: 271
Registered: ‎12-30-2006
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Re: Hello dear Barnes & Noble Readers!

I like that there are special words between Tor and Rose - there are usually private meanings about things in a close relationship - this makes their friendship more realistic.

 

Distinguished Correspondent
Thayer
Posts: 195
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Hello dear Barnes & Noble Readers!

Julia,

 

I also love the thought of "what-the-hell days."  Is this something you try to occasionally schedule or just made up for the book?

 

I feel in great need of one of those myself!   :smileywink:

~~Dawn
Live the life you love ~ Love the life you live.
Inspired Wordsmith
eadieburke
Posts: 1,925
Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: Hello dear Barnes & Noble Readers!


Thayer wrote:

Julia,

 

I also love the thought of "what-the-hell days."  Is this something you try to occasionally schedule or just made up for the book?

 

I feel in great need of one of those myself!   :smileywink:


 

My dad always said that you need to have a "go to hell day" especially in the middle of a diet. One day just to eat everything and anything you want and then the next day it's back on the diet. He said that he cheated less because of that one "go to hell day". 

 

I thought of my dad while reading Julia's "what-the-hell days" and knew exactly what she was talking about!

Eadie - A day out-of-doors, someone I loved to talk with, a good book and some simple food and music -- that would be rest. - Eleanor Roosevelt
Author
Julia_Gregson
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎06-03-2009
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Re: Hello dear Barnes & Noble Readers!

I made up the what-the-hell day for the book, but it is part of my life.  Come to think of it, I haven't had one for a while and must plan.

I love the idea of the go-to-hell diet day.  I totally approve.

Julia 

Wordsmith
Fozzie
Posts: 2,404
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Hello dear Barnes & Noble Readers!


Julia_Gregson wrote:

I made up the expression, 'how balloon,' I just thought it would have been the kind of secret language that 'Tor and Rose might have used.  I like it though, do you?


Now that is not the answer I expected!  I expected that it was a period expression of some sort.

 

How clever of you to have made it up!  I read a statistic once that something on the order of 75% of people think they "have a book in them," a story worth publishing.  Well, I can honestly count myself NOT among those 75%.  I could never think up anything like an expression such as "how balloon."

 

Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
Distinguished Correspondent
Thayer
Posts: 195
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Hello dear Barnes & Noble Readers!


eadieburke wrote:

Thayer wrote:

Julia,

 

I also love the thought of "what-the-hell days."  Is this something you try to occasionally schedule or just made up for the book?

 

I feel in great need of one of those myself!   :smileywink:


 

My dad always said that you need to have a "go to hell day" especially in the middle of a diet. One day just to eat everything and anything you want and then the next day it's back on the diet. He said that he cheated less because of that one "go to hell day". 

 

I thought of my dad while reading Julia's "what-the-hell days" and knew exactly what she was talking about!


 

What a wonderful memory. Thanks for sharing.    :smileyhappy:
~~Dawn
Live the life you love ~ Love the life you live.