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Rachel-K
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Lost Memoirs: Jane Austen as a character

[ Edited ]
Do you recognize the fictional Jane Austen's similarity to any of the most famous Austen heroines? Have you ever thought of yourself or a friend as one of these heroines? With whom do you relate most closely?

Message Edited by Jessica on 01-31-2008 04:08 PM
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SyrieJames
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Re: Jane Austen as a character

Jane Austen's heroines are all very different and equally wonderful-- and they are all flawed in some way. They all learn a lesson of some kind by the end of the story. When I wrote this novel, I didn't consciously try to portray Jane as "similar to" any of her heroines, but rather as her own unique, and (I hoped) very human self.



rkubie wrote:
Do you recognize the fictional Jane Austen's similarity to any of the most famous Austen heroines? Have you ever thought of yourself or a friend as one of these heroines? With whom do you relate most closely?


Learn more about
The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen





Visit www.syriejames.com
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LizzieAnn
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Re: Jane Austen as a character

Perhaps that explains why Austen's novels & heroines are still so popular? Her heroines are not perfect, but are real and realistic women that we can still relate to.



SyrieJames wrote:
Jane Austen's heroines are all very different and equally wonderful-- and they are all flawed in some way. They all learn a lesson of some kind by the end of the story. When I wrote this novel, I didn't consciously try to portray Jane as "similar to" any of her heroines, but rather as her own unique, and (I hoped) very human self.


Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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kiakar
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Re: Jane Austen as a character



LizzieAnn wrote:
Perhaps that explains why Austen's novels & heroines are still so popular? Her heroines are not perfect, but are real and realistic women that we can still relate to.



SyrieJames wrote:
Jane Austen's heroines are all very different and equally wonderful-- and they are all flawed in some way. They all learn a lesson of some kind by the end of the story. When I wrote this novel, I didn't consciously try to portray Jane as "similar to" any of her heroines, but rather as her own unique, and (I hoped) very human self.







But don't you think that she was writing about herself lots of the time.? The anxieties,the struggles, the misfortunes and etc, being a women in her era.
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SyrieJames
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Re: Jane Austen as a character

I think that every writer puts a little of him or herself into every book they write. Certainly Jane Austen was no exception. She wrote about the world she knew: the hopes and dreams and daily struggles of young women of the gentry class (usually the "poor gentry", as opposed to the peerage), who lived in small country villages. Many of her male characters are clergymen or in the navy, because Jane Austen's father and two of her brothers were clergymen, and two other brothers were in the navy. I think her most autobiographical novel was "The Watsons," an unfinished story about poor sisters hoping to find husbands (since that's pretty much all women could aspire to in those days), despite difficult financial and social circumstances. It is presumed that she stopped writing the book (and never went back to it) because it was too close to the circumstances in her own life at the time, and she didn't want to sound like she was complaining. Fortunately for us, Ms. Austen was a master storyteller and highly creative. She combined the real world she knew, and the real problems faced by the people of her class, with the products of her wonderful imagination!



kiakar wrote:


LizzieAnn wrote:
Perhaps that explains why Austen's novels & heroines are still so popular? Her heroines are not perfect, but are real and realistic women that we can still relate to.



SyrieJames wrote:
Jane Austen's heroines are all very different and equally wonderful-- and they are all flawed in some way. They all learn a lesson of some kind by the end of the story. When I wrote this novel, I didn't consciously try to portray Jane as "similar to" any of her heroines, but rather as her own unique, and (I hoped) very human self.







But don't you think that she was writing about herself lots of the time.? The anxieties,the struggles, the misfortunes and etc, being a women in her era.



Learn more about
The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen





Visit www.syriejames.com
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Rachel-K
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Re: Jane Austen as a character

I also think Austen's characters are immensely easy to relate to, flaws and all. And I put the fictional Jane straight into the context that I expect from an Austen novel, I think. It may have been my own desire in wanting to uncover "the real" Jane Austen as a character in one of the stories!
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kiakar
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Re: Jane Austen as a character



rkubie wrote:
I also think Austen's characters are immensely easy to relate to, flaws and all. And I put the fictional Jane straight into the context that I expect from an Austen novel, I think. It may have been my own desire in wanting to uncover "the real" Jane Austen as a character in one of the stories!





Maybe that is what I do too. I think I am trying to know the real Jane Austen by imagining that her stories are all about her life. But I do think alot of the distinctions such as dislikes,occupations she is familiar with, and maybe things she has said or one of her brothers. May be even observing some of her brothers marriages, she has wrote about.
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kiakar
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Re: Jane Austen as a character



rkubie wrote:
Do you recognize the fictional Jane Austen's similarity to any of the most famous Austen heroines? Have you ever thought of yourself or a friend as one of these heroines? With whom do you relate most closely?




I think alot of my friends remind me of Emma. She was very young to think she had the knowledge all sewed up on matchmaking. Knowing who would love who and all that. Emma would be lost in this world of matchmaking, wouldnt she? But I have had friends say to me, he is just for you, you are both alike, and you both like this and that, come on, how do they know that. No one really knows another person. Emma is so funny when she flunks downward on her matchmaking schemes with Harriet. I like Emma almost enought to say its my favorite but I lean alittle toward Persusian too. Ann seemed such a sweet quiet character compared to some in that story. And finally to join her one love that years ago she had let go, was beautiful.
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Rachel-K
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Re: Jane Austen as a character

Emma is also a great favorite of mine! Her naive overestimation of herself--and the effect this has on others--is such a subtle and wonderful way to explore her character. Even more appealing than the ultimately happy romances of Austen's novels, I think it is just such a relief to come across bright and very real women in literature of any earlier age.

What do you think of as Jane's greatest character flaw in the novel?
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kiakar
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Re: Jane Austen as a character



rkubie wrote:
Emma is also a great favorite of mine! Her naive overestimation of herself--and the effect this has on others--is such a subtle and wonderful way to explore her character. Even more appealing than the ultimately happy romances of Austen's novels, I think it is just such a relief to come across bright and very real women in literature of any earlier age.

What do you think of as Jane's greatest character flaw in the novel?




Did you mean Emma or this one we are reading.

Emma's of course was her meddling in others affairs and being so stubborn and pigheaded but of course I say that with kindness, because Emma wouldn't have been such a great book if sh ehadnt had these flaws. It kept the book going and it was quite humorous at times.

This book, as by this author, Jane's biggest flaws were she lacked confidence alot of the time and she had alot of pride that got in her way alot of the time. She seemed ambitious in some ways but lacked the confidence to go forward at times.