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Jessica
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Syrie James' Favorite Austen Novels

Syrie James's Favorite Austen Novels (in order) Are:

Pride & Prejudice Austen's own "darling child" tells the story of fiercely independent Elizabeth Bennet, one of five sisters who must marry rich, as she confounds the arrogant, wealthy Mr. Darcy. What ensues is one of the most delightful and engrossingly readable courtships known to literature, written by a precocious Austen when she was just twenty-one years old.

Persuasion Persuasion follows the romance of Anne Elliot and naval officer Frederick Wentworth. They were happily engaged until Anne’s friend, Lady Russell, persuaded her that Frederick was “unworthy.” Now, eight years later, Frederick returns, a wealthy captain in the navy, while Anne’s family teeters on the edge of bankruptcy. They still love each other, but their past mistakes threaten to keep them apart.

Emma Thinking herself impervious to romance of any kind, Emma tries to arrange a wealthy marriage for poor Harriet, but refuses to recognize her own feelings for the gallant Mr. Knightley. What ensues is a delightful series of scheming escapades in which every social machination and bit of "tittle-tattle" is steeped in Austen's delicious irony. Ultimately, Emma discovers that "Perfect happiness, even in memory, is not common."

Sense and Sensibility Jane Austen’s first published novel, this is a wonderfully entertaining tale of flirtation and folly that revolves around two starkly different sisters, Elinor and Marianne Dashwood. While Elinor is thoughtful, considerate, and calm, her younger sister is emotional and wildly romantic. Both are looking for a husband, but neither Elinor’s reason nor Marianne’s passion can lead them to perfect happiness as Marianne falls for an unscrupulous rascal and Elinor becomes attached to a man who’s already engaged.

Mansfield Park From its sharply satiric opening sentence, Mansfield Park dealas with money and marriage, and how strongly they affect each other. Shy, fragile Fanny Price is the consummate "poor relation." Sent to live with her wealthy uncle Thomas, she clashes with his spoiled, selfish daughters and falls in love with his son. Their lives are further complicated by the arrival of a pair of witty, sophisticated Londoners, whose flair for flirtation collides with the quiet, conservative country ways of Mansfield Park.

Northanger Abbey The story’s unlikely heroine is Catherine Morland, a remarkably innocent seventeen-year-old woman from a country parsonage. While spending a few weeks in Bath with a family friend, Catherine meets and falls in love with Henry Tilney, who invites her to visit his family estate, Northanger Abbey. Once there, Catherine, a great reader of Gothic thrillers, lets the shadowy atmosphere of the old mansion fill her mind with terrible suspicions. What is the mystery surrounding the death of Henry’s mother? Is the family concealing a terrible secret within the elegant rooms of the Abbey? Can she trust Henry, or is he part of an evil conspiracy? Catherine finds dreadful portents in the most prosaic events, until Henry persuades her to see the peril in confusing life with art.

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SyrieJames
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Re: Syrie James' Favorite Austen Novels

I love all of Jane Austen's novels. It was so hard to list them in order of preference. Each book has its own unique heroine and love story, and something that makes it special, timeless and memorable.

What's your favorite Jane Austen novel, and why?

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LizzieAnn
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Favorite Austen Novel

[ Edited ]
I also love all of JA's novels, but Pride & Prejudice has been my favorite for over 30-some-odd years! Interestingly, it was the only one that I read when before I was an adult and is one of my all-time-favorite novels ever. It's hard to say exactly why as there are so many things I love about the novel.

There's Lizzie herself - fun, witty, daring, a romantic, bold, real, flawed, and not a prude or the typical "goody-goody."

Darcy - romantic (!), proves to be caring and compassionate, loyal, strong, protective, and willing to do whatever needs to be done.

The repartee between these two - how there is not an instant attraction, how each one's pride is knocked down, their doubts, their growing, their finding each other - all the complexities of their relationship always makes it an wonderful read.

There's also the richness of many of the other characters (Lydia's wildness, Mr. Bennett's indolence & self-absorbation, Mr. Collins' absurdity, Mrs. Bennett's silliness, etc) and the interweaving of all the different storylines. And while everything is resolved, it is not tied up into a neat little package - Lizzie shields Darcy from her less desirable connections; Jane & Bingley need to leave the vicinity of Mrs. Bennett; Lydia doesn't have a "happily ever after"; Lady deBourgh doesn't get her way. Yet, I can't help but feel that Lizzie & Darcy will have a happy life together.

Message Edited by LizzieAnn on 01-11-2008 12:28 PM
Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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KristyR
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Re: Favorite Austen Novel

My favorite Jane Austen novel is also Pride and Prejudice. I watched the A&E miniseries first, and loved it. So, of course I had to read it, multiple times! It's hard to put into words why I like her novels so much. Maybe it's because her characters became so real to me; that I find myself thinking about them long after the book has been put away. I've read a million different books, but very few that leave the kind of lasting impression Jane's do.
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LizzieAnn
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Re: Favorite Austen Novel

I understand completely Kristy. It's hard to say why - it just IS!



KristyR wrote:
My favorite Jane Austen novel is also Pride and Prejudice. I watched the A&E miniseries first, and loved it. So, of course I had to read it, multiple times! It's hard to put into words why I like her novels so much. Maybe it's because her characters became so real to me; that I find myself thinking about them long after the book has been put away. I've read a million different books, but very few that leave the kind of lasting impression Jane's do.


Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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kiakar
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Re: Favorite Austen Novel

I think I love them because they are so light. They matter, their contents of course, but it will not be the end of the world sort of stuff they are. I think I would want to live the life back then with the Austen clan and her characters. Of course, I know bad things, really bad things happened but to me, it seems like they could breathe easier than we can today. Even when things are going right, we are always stressed about something. And in Austen's day, it just seemed by reading her novels , you could always breathe with a easy sigh.
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kiakar
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Re: Northanger Abbey

This novel will be on Women's Lit. book club next month. Is this book considered the less read of all of Jane Austen's novels? I do not remember reading this at all, I did but I can't recall the story too well. Reading the paragraph about it, it sounds like a great mystery. I have heard its different from the other novels of Jane Austen's. I can't wait to fin dout about it. I have this huge book of all of Jane Austen novels but then I have separate copies of B&N printed paperbacks of them all too. But I can't find my copy of Northhanger. Maybe I didnt get one, thought I did! Oh well, I might just get a copy. They are easier to read than the large large book I have of them all.
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LizzieAnn
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Re: Northanger Abbey

I remember reading at some time that Northanger Abbey and Mansfield Park were JA's less popular & less read novels. Northanger Abbey (which is believed to have been written just before the turn of the century) was the first novel that Jane submitted for publication. A London bookseller bought it but never published it. JA was eventually able to buy it back (through her brother Henry) after she was published and popular author for the exact amount that she sold it for. The publisher didn't know that the author of this manuscript was none other than the "Lady" who's books were so popular. I can just imagine her glee & satisfaction in having outwitted this publisher who sat on this creation for so long. Imagine Henry's delight at informing this publisher of the author's identity & of this publisher's chagrin when he learned what he had given up! :smileyhappy:

Northanger Abbey was actually published after Jane's death. It was published as the first 2 volumes of a 4-volume set, the other novel being Persuasion.



kiakar wrote:
This novel will be on Women's Lit. book club next month. Is this book considered the less read of all of Jane Austen's novels? I do not remember reading this at all, I did but I can't recall the story too well. Reading the paragraph about it, it sounds like a great mystery. I have heard its different from the other novels of Jane Austen's. I can't wait to fin dout about it. I have this huge book of all of Jane Austen novels but then I have separate copies of B&N printed paperbacks of them all too. But I can't find my copy of Northhanger. Maybe I didnt get one, thought I did! Oh well, I might just get a copy. They are easier to read than the large large book I have of them all.


Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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SyrieJames
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Re: Northanger Abbey

I look forward to the Masterpiece Theatre presentation of Northanger Abbey on Sunday night! It received an excellent review in the L.A. Times. I enjoyed the one and only previous film version of NA, from about 20 years ago. The book is indeed "Austen light,"-- about a young woman who learns to tell the difference between fantasy (in books) and reality-- and it's a lot of fun!

Learn more about
The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen





Visit www.syriejames.com
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kiakar
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Northanger Abbey



LizzieAnn wrote:
I remember reading at some time that Northanger Abbey and Mansfield Park were JA's less popular & less read novels. Northanger Abbey (which is believed to have been written just before the turn of the century) was the first novel that Jane submitted for publication. A London bookseller bought it but never published it. JA was eventually able to buy it back (through her brother Henry) after she was published and popular author for the exact amount that she sold it for. The publisher didn't know that the author of this manuscript was none other than the "Lady" who's books were so popular. I can just imagine her glee & satisfaction in having outwitted this publisher who sat on this creation for so long. Imagine Henry's delight at informing this publisher of the author's identity & of this publisher's chagrin when he learned what he had given up! :smileyhappy:

Northanger Abbey was actually published after Jane's death. It was published as the first 2 volumes of a 4-volume set, the other novel being Persuasion.



kiakar wrote:
This novel will be on Women's Lit. book club next month. Is this book considered the less read of all of Jane Austen's novels? I do not remember reading this at all, I did but I can't recall the story too well. Reading the paragraph about it, it sounds like a great mystery. I have heard its different from the other novels of Jane Austen's. I can't wait to fin dout about it. I have this huge book of all of Jane Austen novels but then I have separate copies of B&N printed paperbacks of them all too. But I can't find my copy of Northhanger. Maybe I didnt get one, thought I did! Oh well, I might just get a copy. They are easier to read than the large large book I have of them all.







Thanks for that tidbit. Very interesting.
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kiakar
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Northanger Abbey



SyrieJames wrote:
I look forward to the Masterpiece Theatre presentation of Northanger Abbey on Sunday night! It received an excellent review in the L.A. Times. I enjoyed the one and only previous film version of NA, from about 20 years ago. The book is indeed "Austen light,"-- about a young woman who learns to tell the difference between fantasy (in books) and reality-- and it's a lot of fun!




Yes, Syrie I sure want to watch it tomarrow night also. the book also sounds good.
Thanks.