Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Frequent Contributor
Jessica
Posts: 968
Registered: ‎09-24-2006
0 Kudos

About the Book & Author

Nineteen Minutes by Jodi Picoult

Title: Nineteen Minutes

In nineteen minutes, you can mow the front lawn, color your hair, watch a third of a hockey game. In nineteen minutes, you can bake scones or get a tooth filled by a dentist; you can fold laundry for a family of five. In nineteen minutes, you can stop the world, or you can just jump off it.

In nineteen minutes, you can get revenge.

Sterling is a small, ordinary New Hampshire town where nothing ever happens -- until the day its complacency is shattered by a shocking act of violence. In the aftermath, the town's residents must not only seek justice in order to begin healing but also come to terms with the role they played in the tragedy. For them, the lines between truth and fiction, right and wrong, insider and outsider have been obscured forever. Josie Cormier, the teenage daughter of the judge sitting on the case, could be the state's best witness, but she can't remember what happened in front of her own eyes. And as the trial progresses, fault lines between the high school and the adult community begin to show, destroying the closest of friendships and families.

Nineteen Minutes has been called Picoult's most raw, honest, and important novel yet. Told with the straightforward style for which she has become known, it asks simple questions that have no easy answers: Can your own child become a mystery to you? What does it mean to be different in our society? Is it ever okay for a victim to strike back? And who -- if anyone -- has the right to judge someone else?

About the Author: Born on Long Island, New York, Jodi Picoult was convinced that the tranquil, suburban setting offered no real inspiration to her for being a writer. There was no drama; just the daily grind of families living their lives. Eventually, though, the story of this challenge became the core of Picoult's bestselling novels.

Picoult studied creative writing at Princeton, and before she graduated, she had two short stories published in Seventeen magazine. This early success inspired Picoult to devote her life to writing. After college, she paid the bills with a series of copywriting and editing jobs, and she even taught eighth grade English. Marriage and children soon followed, and while she was pregnant with her first child, she wrote her first novel, Songs of the Humpback Whale, a remarkable tale told from five different points of view that heralded a bold new voice in fiction.

In subsequent novels, Picoult has mined the complex mysteries of everyday life: love, marriage, career, family. Faced with difficult, often painful moral choices, her characters struggle to find balance in an off-kilter world fraught with danger and shattered by terrible sociological ills like domestic violence, sexual abuse, and teen suicide. Though page-turners of the highest order, Picoult's stories avoid easy solutions and provoke thoughtful reading and animated discussion. Unsurprisingly, they are a favorite choice for book clubs.

Discover all titles and editions from Jodi Picoult.

ek
Contributor
ek
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎02-01-2008
0 Kudos

Re: About the Book & Author

Jessica, Will there me a discussion with Jodi Picoult about Nineteen Minutes?  I can't find the date and time, I am new at this as you can see from above, and have had difficulty finding this information about Jodi Picoult.
Thanks,
Elaine from Texas 
Scribe
vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: About the Book & Author


ek wrote:
Jessica, Will there me a discussion with Jodi Picoult about Nineteen Minutes? I can't find the date and time, I am new at this as you can see from above, and have had difficulty finding this information about Jodi Picoult.
Thanks,
Elaine from Texas



This will be a moderator lead discussion group only. The author wont be joining us on this one, thats why there are no dates announced. But we can still have a good discussion too and the moderator will post threads for us.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
Contributor
ladydi22
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎01-31-2008
0 Kudos

Re: About the Book & Author

[ Edited ]
Is there a formal start date to this discussion?  I just finished this book recently after having started it about 9 months ago.  Many of my friends had children in the building at Columbine and two of the victims' funerals were held at our church.  Needless to say it stirred up memories and emotions as a mother and as a member of the Columbine community.  It was a tough to get through the book for me but it was worth it.  Looking forward to discussing this book!


Message Edited by ladydi22 on 03-02-2008 07:11 PM
Scribe
vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: About the Book & Author


ladydi22 wrote:
Is there a formal start date to this discussion? I just finished this book recently after having started it about 9 months ago. Many of my friends had children in the building at Columbine and two of the victims' funerals were held at our church. Needless to say it stirred up memories and emotions as a mother and as a member of the Columbine community. It was a tough to get through the book for me but it was worth it. Looking forward to discussing this book!


Message Edited by ladydi22 on 03-02-2008 07:11 PM


hopefully, the board threads will be posted tomorrow for discussion. Tomorrow is the formal start date for all the new March books I think.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
Inspired Wordsmith
Stephanie
Posts: 2,613
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: About the Book & Author

Hi Everyone,
 
Great to see you all here ready to start discussion!  To answer a few questions, yes, as your moderator I'll be posting some discussion threads, but I really hope that you all will do the same- I know B&N members always have great ideas and questions for discussion.  Lots of times discussion questions are just those things we all think about when we're reading- such as, Do I agree with this character's point of view?  What makes him/her tick?  Is the central issue one I've struggled with myself, or can relate to in some way? 
 
Jodi Picoult's books remind me of an old television show called Picket Fences - usually at the start of the show you (the viewer) stood firmly on one side of the issue or the other.  By the hour's end, however, I was almost always straddling the fence - eyes and mind wide open!   The issues presented were much like the issues in Picoult's novels, ones that centered on family and "life" in general.   After I read one of Jodi's novels, I feel as if my mind has been opened for broader thinking on multiple topics, not just the one she's presented to me.   
Stephanie
Contributor
ladydi22
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎01-31-2008
0 Kudos

Re: About the Book & Author


Stephanie wrote:
 
 
Jodi Picoult's books remind me of an old television show called Picket Fences - usually at the start of the show you (the viewer) stood firmly on one side of the issue or the other.  By the hour's end, however, I was almost always straddling the fence - eyes and mind wide open!   The issues presented were much like the issues in Picoult's novels, ones that centered on family and "life" in general.   After I read one of Jodi's novels, I feel as if my mind has been opened for broader thinking on multiple topics, not just the one she's presented to me.   



I remember that show!  Right now it's hard to recall some of the topics but I agree that this book was much more than face value.  Sometimes it was hard to see myself in some of the characters...too ready to judge others when I shold be looking in the mirror.  Her book is important because of her ability to help us feel "as if my/our mind(s) have been opened for broader thinking on multiple topics, not just the one she's presented."
Contributor
ladydi22
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎01-31-2008
0 Kudos

Re: About the Book & Author

Reading this book made me remember times when I was bullied in school and the feelings that it aroused in me.  I remember feeling more sorry for myself than wanting to act out or seek revenge.  I have friends who have had significant difficulty in their lives as a result of being the object of bullying.  I'm interested in experiences that others had and how it impacted their adult lives.
Inspired Correspondent
Wrighty
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: About the Book & Author

I grew up in a small town and almost everyone knows each other. I was lucky to have very good friends and great experiences in school. I had my share of issues and some "typical" teasing and things but nothing ever like this story. The only bullying I remember was from the class bullies and we're still afraid of some of them. I recently had my 25th class reunion from high school. It was such fun and many of us relived great times. I was so sad to hear that some classmates didn't want to come or came but hadn't enjoyed high school. They talked about being bullied or feeling awkward and unwanted. There were so many incidents that I hadn't known about and I found myself thinking back to those days and hoping I was never involved in someone else's bad experiences. I know I wasn't cruel or a bully but had I been a thoughtless teenager or allowed someone else to cause pain? I truly hope not but that may not be the way someone else remembered it.
 
As a parent and a former teacher I have always tried very hard to be aware of the many things that can hurt a child's feelings and can cause them stress, discomfort, fear, sadness, anything that can bring them harm. In school I tried very hard to accomodate all of their different personalities so they had good experiences when they were with me. It wasn't about who was the smartest, the fastest or the prettiest. They would get enough of that later in life. In my class I tried to teach them to try their hardest, be a good sport, be kind and to believe in yourself. I hope I had many successes. I know I had great kids who were great students. I miss them very much.
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: About the Book & Author

Wrighty, you remind me of how nice some people were to me when I was shunned. When I look back, alot of it was my doing, by showing hurt and fear you encourage the bully. Even when nicer people would come up and befriend me I still couldn't get over what the bullies were saying. In a lunch room, in the 8th grade, Seven bullies ridiculed me to the point of utter dismay. Sometimes when I think about it now I still try to block out some of the hurtful things that happened. And like what happened in this story, the bullying continued on for months. Finally they found another patsy. But my mom contacted my homeroom teacher and he said that I appeared to be unfriendly and hardly ever smiled and that I would have to deal with this myself. Of course this was in 1957 and revenge was never thought of.  I wish I had of known how to handle it back then as I do now. I was lacking in confidence then but after that, I felt like I was this monster that no one wanted to be apart of. But of course, through the years, I am ok and know I count up there with the rest of this human race.
Inspired Wordsmith
Stephanie
Posts: 2,613
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: About the Book & Author

Linda,
 
It breaks my heart to hear that anyone was ever mean to you.  Makes me want to travel back in time....
 
I had a rough patch in 6th grade -  I suppose a boy liked me, and since I wasn't interested, he and the other boys in the class decided that it would be fun to taunt me, call me names, etc.  On the way home one day, I cornered him, whipped him soundly, and that was the end of that.  As my teacher (a man) had mentioned to me, no 6th grade boy is ever going to admit that a little girl beat him at anything, so there was no chance he'd ever tell!  :smileyvery-happy:
 
There seems to be an awkward child in every class.  In my daughter's 3rd grade class there is a boy who walks a little differently, talks a little too loudly, and just doesn't quite "fit" - The other kids tell him to bug off quite a bit, I understand.  I expressly told my daughter that it was up to her to make sure she was nice, and never mean to him, and if she could (she's pretty shy) to tell the other kids to be nice to him as well.   I also emailed her teacher, told her about Nineteen Minutes, to which she replied, "I just read it over the weekend, wasn't it great!"  And she is also on the lookout for this boy, helping him to get along better and making sure the other kids include him.  I think we all have to do what we can in our own corner of the world to make sure that no-one, child or adult, is treated disrespectfully. 
 
Sorry folks, didn't mean to be so long-winded!
Stephanie
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: About the Book & Author



Stephanie wrote:
Linda,
 
It breaks my heart to hear that anyone was ever mean to you.  Makes me want to travel back in time....
 
I had a rough patch in 6th grade -  I suppose a boy liked me, and since I wasn't interested, he and the other boys in the class decided that it would be fun to taunt me, call me names, etc.  On the way home one day, I cornered him, whipped him soundly, and that was the end of that.  As my teacher (a man) had mentioned to me, no 6th grade boy is ever going to admit that a little girl beat him at anything, so there was no chance he'd ever tell!  :smileyvery-happy:
 
There seems to be an awkward child in every class.  In my daughter's 3rd grade class there is a boy who walks a little differently, talks a little too loudly, and just doesn't quite "fit" - The other kids tell him to bug off quite a bit, I understand.  I expressly told my daughter that it was up to her to make sure she was nice, and never mean to him, and if she could (she's pretty shy) to tell the other kids to be nice to him as well.   I also emailed her teacher, told her about Nineteen Minutes, to which she replied, "I just read it over the weekend, wasn't it great!"  And she is also on the lookout for this boy, helping him to get along better and making sure the other kids include him.  I think we all have to do what we can in our own corner of the world to make sure that no-one, child or adult, is treated disrespectfully. 
 
Sorry folks, didn't mean to be so long-winded!


Thats quite ok. I give you permission to get long-winded whenever you have such wisdom to say!
Inspired Correspondent
Wrighty
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: About the Book & Author



Stephanie wrote:
Linda,
 
It breaks my heart to hear that anyone was ever mean to you.  Makes me want to travel back in time....
 
I had a rough patch in 6th grade -  I suppose a boy liked me, and since I wasn't interested, he and the other boys in the class decided that it would be fun to taunt me, call me names, etc.  On the way home one day, I cornered him, whipped him soundly, and that was the end of that.  As my teacher (a man) had mentioned to me, no 6th grade boy is ever going to admit that a little girl beat him at anything, so there was no chance he'd ever tell!  :smileyvery-happy:
 
There seems to be an awkward child in every class.  In my daughter's 3rd grade class there is a boy who walks a little differently, talks a little too loudly, and just doesn't quite "fit" - The other kids tell him to bug off quite a bit, I understand.  I expressly told my daughter that it was up to her to make sure she was nice, and never mean to him, and if she could (she's pretty shy) to tell the other kids to be nice to him as well.   I also emailed her teacher, told her about Nineteen Minutes, to which she replied, "I just read it over the weekend, wasn't it great!"  And she is also on the lookout for this boy, helping him to get along better and making sure the other kids include him.  I think we all have to do what we can in our own corner of the world to make sure that no-one, child or adult, is treated disrespectfully. 
 
Sorry folks, didn't mean to be so long-winded!


Linda,
I wish I could travel through time too! You were only a child that was being bullied and the teacher didn't even help. Don't you ever blame yourself for that. You shouldn't have to be tough to enjoy school. It's hard for everyone to deal with. Even the teachers who do their best can find it hard to control these situations. It's very lucky for us that you are the sweet lady you are today.
 
Stephanie,
Good for you for letting the teacher know about that child. It may make all the difference in his life. And the talk with your daughter will make her and maybe others more aware of how important it is to be nice. There are a few boys who go to school with my kids that are great kids but they are a bit awkward and shy. They had great friends and classmates who were kind to them and helped draw them out of their shell as they were growing up. Those kids blossomed and are so much more outgoing now. Kindness made all the difference. Unfortunately there are probably many more who didn't have people treat them well and will never forget it.

Inspired Wordsmith
Stephanie
Posts: 2,613
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: About the Book & Author

Deb,
 
Sad but true - too many kids never have their peers extend any kindnesses, and it makes them even more shy, withdrawn and awkward.  It's poetic justice when they grow up to run big companies (think: Bill Gates!) deciding who gets the job and who doesn't.  :smileyhappy:
 
 
Stephanie
Scribe
vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: About the Book & Author/ before and after chapters

I have a question to all of you about the way the book is written. It is set up in before and after chapters. Now most of the time, I get really bored with books that time travel back and forth constantly, never staying in one time frame long enough to keep it interesting. But in this type of book, I see it almost like the incident, and how it would be in a trial. At the trial you would go back and forth, back to childhood incidences (mostly on the defense side) and after to the incident and aftermath (mostly the prosecution side) so I have been pretty ok with it. How have you all liked this way of telling the story? Also, did you notice one problem I did have with it tho, is that some chapters have the exact same titles tho, like 3 days later, or whatever and when I want to go back to read something, I have to find the right - 3 days later chapter. Any thoughts on how the book is set up as you read along? I am finding it pretty interesting actually and in most parts, she makes the breaks at good times.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
Wordsmith
kiakar
Posts: 3,435
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: About the Book & Author/ before and after chapters



vivico1 wrote:
I have a question to all of you about the way the book is written. It is set up in before and after chapters. Now most of the time, I get really bored with books that time travel back and forth constantly, never staying in one time frame long enough to keep it interesting. But in this type of book, I see it almost like the incident, and how it would be in a trial. At the trial you would go back and forth, back to childhood incidences (mostly on the defense side) and after to the incident and aftermath (mostly the prosecution side) so I have been pretty ok with it. How have you all liked this way of telling the story? Also, did you notice one problem I did have with it tho, is that some chapters have the exact same titles tho, like 3 days later, or whatever and when I want to go back to read something, I have to find the right - 3 days later chapter. Any thoughts on how the book is set up as you read along? I am finding it pretty interesting actually and in most parts, she makes the breaks at good times.

I know Vivian, Jodi is excellent in doing that. It depends what the story is about whether I prefer this way of writing. I think with this book, it would become very boring just to hear the trial and then all of the incidents leading up to it and the other. In some stories this is the only way. And like I said, Jodi knows how to place all the information that makes for a excellant fabulous book.
Inspired Correspondent
Wrighty
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: About the Book & Author/ before and after chapters



kiakar wrote:


vivico1 wrote:
I have a question to all of you about the way the book is written. It is set up in before and after chapters. Now most of the time, I get really bored with books that time travel back and forth constantly, never staying in one time frame long enough to keep it interesting. But in this type of book, I see it almost like the incident, and how it would be in a trial. At the trial you would go back and forth, back to childhood incidences (mostly on the defense side) and after to the incident and aftermath (mostly the prosecution side) so I have been pretty ok with it. How have you all liked this way of telling the story? Also, did you notice one problem I did have with it tho, is that some chapters have the exact same titles tho, like 3 days later, or whatever and when I want to go back to read something, I have to find the right - 3 days later chapter. Any thoughts on how the book is set up as you read along? I am finding it pretty interesting actually and in most parts, she makes the breaks at good times.

I know Vivian, Jodi is excellent in doing that. It depends what the story is about whether I prefer this way of writing. I think with this book, it would become very boring just to hear the trial and then all of the incidents leading up to it and the other. In some stories this is the only way. And like I said, Jodi knows how to place all the information that makes for a excellant fabulous book.

 
I like the way she breaks up the chapters. You're right, it doesn't always work in books but she does it well. She times it so it's suspenseful and you want to know the answers to a situation. She moves back and forth through time and shows you how it got to that moment. She doesn't give you all of the answers at once though so it leaves you wanting more.

New User
followay7969
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎04-23-2008
0 Kudos

Re: About the Book & Author

I am new to the book discussion and club.  I hope to read this book fairly soon.  I really have enjoyed her previous works.
Frequent Contributor
WildCityWoman
Posts: 683
Registered: ‎01-18-2007
0 Kudos

Re: About the Book & Author

I've been doing this book on audio (MP 3 Player), while gardening.
 
Nearly through with it now. I think it's something I'll read again, from the beginning, if I see it on another book discussion.
 
A lot of it is repetitive, but that's to keep the enormity of everything that happened at the forefront of the reader's attention, I suppose.
 
 
Carly

http://wildcity.proboards14.com/index.cgi?board=Books
Frequent Contributor
WildCityWoman
Posts: 683
Registered: ‎01-18-2007
0 Kudos

Re: About the Book & Author

If anybody would like to start this from the beginning and discuss it, I've put it up at my own forums - Wild City Writers' . . .
 
Click here for the book discussion thread I've started . . .
 
Carly

http://wildcity.proboards14.com/index.cgi?board=Books
Users Online
Currently online: 49 members 1,018 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: