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BookSavage
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Registered: ‎01-11-2008
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Re: Introductions/ we three and thee and a new book

Stephanie,
 
  I actually haven't finished it yet.  I'm about half way through it, but so far it has really taken an emotional toll on me.  I think it has profoundly impacted me as a mother of two small boys.  I don't want them to grow up like Joey and Peter.  My oldest, Jacob, has this great personality not to mention the cutest red hair and blue eyes, and my youngest, Jude, (granted he is 6 months old) doesn't seem to be as out going, but he has light hair and big blue eyes.  So I have always been worried that people will be drawn toward Jacob and kind of forget Jude.  Thankfully so far that hasn't happened, but now I think I will be more aware of how my boys interact together.  I think this book also makes me realize I need to be on top of bulling from day one.  I can't wait to finish the book, but with two small boys it is taking me longer than I would like.  Thanks for the welcome, and I'm looking forward to discussing more.
 
Karla
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Wrighty
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Introductions/ we three and thee and a new book



BookSavage wrote:
Stephanie,
 
  I actually haven't finished it yet.  I'm about half way through it, but so far it has really taken an emotional toll on me.  I think it has profoundly impacted me as a mother of two small boys.  I don't want them to grow up like Joey and Peter.  My oldest, Jacob, has this great personality not to mention the cutest red hair and blue eyes, and my youngest, Jude, (granted he is 6 months old) doesn't seem to be as out going, but he has light hair and big blue eyes.  So I have always been worried that people will be drawn toward Jacob and kind of forget Jude.  Thankfully so far that hasn't happened, but now I think I will be more aware of how my boys interact together.  I think this book also makes me realize I need to be on top of bulling from day one.  I can't wait to finish the book, but with two small boys it is taking me longer than I would like.  Thanks for the welcome, and I'm looking forward to discussing more.
 
Karla


Welcome Karla! It's great to have another person added to the mix. We haven't had that many people here but we are having some really good discussions. I just finished the book yesterday and it took an emotional toll on me too. I have three teenage boys and it was way too scary. I couldn't help making comparisons to their schools and classmates.
 
You're boys sound adorable! I really miss those early years but the teen years are so much better than I ever imagined. It's not always easy but I was petrified to have teenagers in this day and age! It's like every stage, sometimes it's rough but most of the time it's awesome. I'm sure your boys will grow up just fine. You're already conscious of potential problems that we all face and that's half the battle. Do your best, don't make yourself crazy worrying about it and enjoy your kids. I look forward to hearing more from you as you read the book.
 
~Deb

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dghobbs
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Re: Introductions

I am Doug from High Point, New Jersey. "Nineteen Minutes" is a well written and tough novel. I started it before Virginia Tech and completed it shortly just after. doug
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cindersue
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Re: Introductions

Hi All!  I'm "The Yankee" from the north.  hehehe  I am feeling very overwhelmed with life, but am trying very hard to finish the book.  I'm a little over 1/2 way done.  I really like the way Jody writes.  Her descriptive writing, for me, makes me visualize each setting very well.
 
I have 4 kids ... 17-24.  I have been fortunate to have very social children.  They have not been in the most "popular" groups, but they have great friends and have encounter different types of experiences as they have grown.  Thru Scouts, athletics, church and schools, they have a wide span of friends.
 
My oldest brother was picked on in high school.  He was 6'5", not very athletic and very skinny.  We later found out he had kleinfelters, a genetic disorder which required additional doses of hormones.  Unfortunately his pediatrician missed diagnosing this until he was well out of h.s.  However, my other brother would come to his defense whenever he could.  This did help the situation somewhat at h.s.
 
My nephew has been picked on all of his school days.  He's now a freshmen in a community college.  He is a gentle, quiet fellow, whose father never played with him while growing up.  He always helped the "weaker" kids at school.  One of his best friends has a birth defect.  John reminds me of Peter.  :smileysad: 
 
I also live close to Northern IL Univ., and know many kids that go there.  I started reading the book because my book buddies suggested it.  I didn't know the plot.  I have many emotions going as I read this, but am enjoying it nevertheless.
 
Sorry ... so lengthy ... but wanted to say "Hey!" to you all.  :smileywink:
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Stephanie
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Re: Introductions



dghobbs wrote:
I am Doug from High Point, New Jersey. "Nineteen Minutes" is a well written and tough novel. I started it before Virginia Tech and completed it shortly just after. doug


Hi Doug,
 
What timing on your read!  I suppose this novel would put a whole different spin on the Virginia Tech incident, wouldn't it?
 
I wonder if, upon reading this book, teenagers who feel the way that Peter do would see themselves in him?  How do you think they might react to him?  Group, your thoughts? 
 
 
Stephanie
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Stephanie
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Re: Introductions

"Hey" right back at you, Cindersue,
 
Good to see you here.  Might this be a slower read for you because you feel a personal connection to it?  It's a shame that his father never played with nephew, but quiet and gentle and kind to others sounds like a pretty good guy, especially for this day and age.  Tell him that's what I would like my son to emulate.
 
Take your time reading- no rush.  Jump in where you want to, we'll steer you away from any spoilers. 
Stephanie
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dghobbs
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Re: Introductions



Stephanie wrote:


dghobbs wrote:
I am Doug from High Point, New Jersey. "Nineteen Minutes" is a well written and tough novel. I started it before Virginia Tech and completed it shortly just after. doug


Hi Doug,
What timing on your read! I suppose this novel would put a whole different spin on the Virginia Tech incident, wouldn't it?
I wonder if, upon reading this book, teenagers who feel the way that Peter do would see themselves in him? How do you think they might react to him? Group, your thoughts?





Stephanie,

These are hard questions. Yes, I do think that "teenagers who feel the way that Peter do would see themselves in him?". I would hope they would be revolted by his final actions. I would also hope they would get help. Doug
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capgo2007
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Re: Introductions

My name is Carla and I've read a number of 1odi's books, and as you said all are well written and timely but I don't know if someone in Peters circumstances would necessarily see himself? Like thoes that ccmmit sucide , they don't see what we see. They are in depression or so upset that they son't think logically, as we do, who are not, thankfully, in those circumstances. I am not finished with this book ,as yet, but will be by tonight. Thank you for "listening" !!!
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kiakar
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Introductions



capgo2007 wrote:
My name is Carla and I've read a number of 1odi's books, and as you said all are well written and timely but I don't know if someone in Peters circumstances would necessarily see himself? Like thoes that ccmmit sucide , they don't see what we see. They are in depression or so upset that they son't think logically, as we do, who are not, thankfully, in those circumstances. I am not finished with this book ,as yet, but will be by tonight. Thank you for "listening" !!!


I really think most kids will see theirselves in Peter. That is why I am glad this story didn't end up the way it could have ended  up. That wouldnt have been a good lesson for others, because this is what so many kids do not learn is consequences. And when they see how Peter was taunted, maybe it will come to them what Peter could have done better. Are parents , what they can do that Peter's didn't. This book in fact, can teach alot to teens and their mentors. It opens a valley above the mountain, people can understand where this comes from and where it can lead and maybe after climbing down off that mountain into the valley, we see the whole picture. With Focus on this problem, it can be demolished. No unkind comment should never be allowed to bellow out and destroy the soul of another.
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kiakar
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Re: Introductions



dghobbs wrote:


Stephanie wrote:


dghobbs wrote:
I am Doug from High Point, New Jersey. "Nineteen Minutes" is a well written and tough novel. I started it before Virginia Tech and completed it shortly just after.


Hey Doug, Are you the same Doug who has been in alot of our clubs. I was thinking it was High Point, North Carolina though? Probably my mistake? If its you, how are your daughters doing?
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dghobbs
Posts: 133
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Re: Introductions



kiakar wrote:


dghobbs wrote:


Stephanie wrote:


dghobbs wrote:
I am Doug from High Point, New Jersey. "Nineteen Minutes" is a well written and tough novel. I started it before Virginia Tech and completed it shortly just after.


Hey Doug, Are you the same Doug who has been in alot of our clubs. I was thinking it was High Point, North Carolina though? Probably my mistake? If its you, how are your daughters doing?





Hi,

Yes, I am the same Doug - of course High Point, NC is far more famous than High Point, NJ (which is the highest point in NJ, but under 2,000 feet).

My daughters are doing just fine. Alyssa, my oldest will graduate from college in May. Hannah, who is 19, is taking a break from college to be an intern at our local Community Supported Garden. Her real desire is to be work in Organic Farming. Mahala, who is 15 now, decided to stop HomeSchooling and went into High School this year as a Freshman. She decided to do this, since she would like to become a large-animal Veterinarian - she loves horses and horse back riding. She thinks doing well in High School will enable her to get into a good college and then Vet School. This is her current goal and has been for several years, but she is recognizes that her priorities may change, but getting into a good college will help with anything she chooses to do. :smileyhappy:Doug
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Wrighty
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Introductions



capgo2007 wrote:
My name is Carla and I've read a number of 1odi's books, and as you said all are well written and timely but I don't know if someone in Peters circumstances would necessarily see himself? Like thoes that ccmmit sucide , they don't see what we see. They are in depression or so upset that they son't think logically, as we do, who are not, thankfully, in those circumstances. I am not finished with this book ,as yet, but will be by tonight. Thank you for "listening" !!!

Hi Carla, welcome to the club. I was thinking along the same lines that you were. I think some people may see themselves in this story but anyone who is mentally ill probably wouldn't. Depending on their problem, they may not realize there is anything wrong anyway. Wasn't that the case with the person who committed the shootings at Virginia Tech? I thought I recalled that he had been previously treated for a mental illness but stopped. He was in a downward spiral when he finally broke.  Mental illnesses have been around a long time. Why has there been such a rash of shootings in recent years? Why do they (anyone who shoots) express their anger and frustration in this particular way? Is it the changes in society, the many forms of violence we allow now? Apparently it's way too easy to get guns and they are way too effective.

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Wrighty
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Re: Introductions



cindersue wrote:
 
I also live close to Northern IL Univ., and know many kids that go there.  I started reading the book because my book buddies suggested it.  I didn't know the plot.  I have many emotions going as I read this, but am enjoying it nevertheless.
 
Sorry ... so lengthy ... but wanted to say "Hey!" to you all.  :smileywink:


Hi Cindy! So glad you could join us here. I wondered if this subject would be tough on you. Having kids in college and living so near the university that had the recent shootings I thought of you as soon as I heard about it.
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Stephanie
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Re: Introductions

Well, I guess I didn't proofread that post!  The reason I ask about troubled teenagers seeing themselves in Peter is that I remember really relating to some characters in the books I read as a kid, and definitely NOT relating to others.  For instance, Ernest Hemingway did nothing for me when I was in HS, I could not relate even a tiny bit.  However, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn was a favorite when I was 12 - and how much could I really relate to Francie Nolan, a poverty stricken girl from the turn-of-the-century whose "Singing Waiter"  Irish father dies drunk?   Certainly my own Italian father was nothing like him, but Francie loved to read and write, and she certainly had me there. 
 
Would boys who are bullied read Peter's story and think, "Man, this kid is really a loser.  At least stuff like that never happens to me.  I can at least do .... (fill in the blank)."   I would love to hear from some of Jodi's younger readers, to know what kind of an impact this story might have on them.  Would a young girl whose boyfriend was too pushy (literally) see herself in Josie, and think, "Why am I dating this creep, anyway?" 
 
 
Stephanie
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onecunninggirl
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Registered: ‎03-25-2008
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Re: Introductions

Stephanie,
 
  I am so right there with you on A Tree Grows in Brooklyn.  I think I read that book in like a day or two, and the whole time I pictured myself as Francis Nolan...and it was a far stretch for me.  I grew up with both of my parents, in a middle class home, and my dad was far from being drunk.  There was just something timeless about that book.
 
 I do think this book is timely, and unfortunately I'm afraid it may be something people can identify with for a long time.  I was in High School when Columbine happened, and I remeber the fear that I had and that my parent had sending me back to school even though we were states away.  I would love to know more about the state of high school students these days.  It has been a few years since I have been a student in a classroom.
 
Karla
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