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Stephanie
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Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Lewis and Happiness

Lewis' career is centered on happiness- do we think you can really apply statistics to happiness?   What's your take on Lewis?
 
 
Stephanie
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hrobinson42
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Re: Lewis and Happiness

I think the old adage "Those that can't play, teach." applies to Lewis. I don't think he is very happy at home, but I definatly don't think he would admit to that. I think he and Lacy seem close- however I'm only a 100 or so pages into the book.

I find a mathematic equation for happiness very ironic. Still, the actual equation- reality divided by expectations- to be somewhat interesting; even more interesting is when he flips it and ruminates on its reciprocal expectations over reality and how that is hope. I don't think such a gross over simplification can ever really explain all the nuances of human happiness, but I did find it intriguing. I think there is merit to it even despite the irony of having happiness plugged into a formula.

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vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Lewis and Happiness


hrobinson42 wrote:

I think the old adage "Those that can't play, teach." applies to Lewis. I don't think he is very happy at home, but I definatly don't think he would admit to that. I think he and Lacy seem close- however I'm only a 100 or so pages into the book.

I find a mathematic equation for happiness very ironic. Still, the actual equation- reality divided by expectations- to be somewhat interesting; even more interesting is when he flips it and ruminates on its reciprocal expectations over reality and how that is hope. I don't think such a gross over simplification can ever really explain all the nuances of human happiness, but I did find it intriguing. I think there is merit to it even despite the irony of having happiness plugged into a formula.




I thought his whole equation was ridiculous and the sign of a man who wasn't really happy, or was trying to figure out, if you do this and this and this, you will get it and once you have it you have it. Also putting life down to simple equations may help him deal with the unexpected, like their oldest sons death.
Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
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Wrighty
Posts: 1,762
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Lewis and Happiness



vivico1 wrote:

hrobinson42 wrote:

I think the old adage "Those that can't play, teach." applies to Lewis. I don't think he is very happy at home, but I definatly don't think he would admit to that. I think he and Lacy seem close- however I'm only a 100 or so pages into the book.

I find a mathematic equation for happiness very ironic. Still, the actual equation- reality divided by expectations- to be somewhat interesting; even more interesting is when he flips it and ruminates on its reciprocal expectations over reality and how that is hope. I don't think such a gross over simplification can ever really explain all the nuances of human happiness, but I did find it intriguing. I think there is merit to it even despite the irony of having happiness plugged into a formula.


I thought his whole equation was ridiculous and the sign of a man who wasn't really happy, or was trying to figure out, if you do this and this and this, you will get it and once you have it you have it. Also putting life down to simple equations may help him deal with the unexpected, like their oldest sons death.

The more I read about Lewis the more interesting I found his equation. I didn't think it was ridiculous when I understood more about him. He is described as a creature of habit. He is an economist and he needs math, data and equations to do his job. Applying his formula to himself seems to be his way of making sense out of the chaos of his life. He's lost, with nothing to do and no way to help. He finds comfort applying his theories so why not try to do it with his personal problems? He does say that math can only take you so far. I think he is struggling to find the balance between what he knows (math) and what to do to try to repair his damaged family.


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