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Inspired Wordsmith
Sovereign_Queen
Posts: 283
Registered: ‎11-28-2008
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Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

clach bhuai-- a stone of power.  A (usually) seemingly ordinary rock (or a crystal, or a polished ball of jasper) with inherent magical abilities.  Sometimes associated with necromancy, these stones ensure good luck for their owner, help foretell the future, or bestow magical powers upon the holder.  

Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

[ Edited ]

Homunculus:  (1) an artificially made dwarf supposedly produced in a flask by an alchemist. (2) A fully formed, miniature human body believed, according to some medical theories of the 16th and 17th centuries, to be contained in the spermatozoon.


 

Wendigo: (aka Windigo, Weendigo, Windago, Windiga, Witiko, Wihtikow, and other variants…) a mythological creature appearing in the mythology of Algonquian speaking people defined as a malevolent, cannibalistic, supernatural being infused with great spiritual power into which humans could transform or which could possess humans.

 

Basil Johnston, an Ojibwa teacher and scholar from Ontario gives one description of how Wendigos were viewed:

 

"The Weendigo was gaunt to the point of emaciation, its desiccated skin pulled tautly over its bone. With its bones pushing out against its skin, its complexion the ash gray of death, and its eyes pushed deep into their sockets, the Weendigo looked like a gaunt skeleton recently disinterred from the grave. What lips it had were tattered and bloody […] Unclean and suffering from suppuration of the flesh, the Weendigo gave off a strange and eerie odor of decay and decomposition, of death and corruption."

 

At the same time, Wendigos were embodiments of gluttony, greed, and excess; never satisfied after killing and consuming one person, they were constantly searching for new victims. They were strongly associated with the Winter, the North, and coldness, as well as with famine and starvation. 

 

(Note, disinter is also a good word which means to exhume, dig up or disturb an entombed  dead body.)

 


 

Doppelganger: a ghostly double of a living person, especially one that haunts its fleshly counterpart.


 

Xeroderma pigmentosum, or XP: an autosomal recessive genetic disorder of DNA repair in which the ability to repair damage caused by ultraviolet (UV) light is deficient. In extreme cases all exposure to sunlight must be forbidden, no matter how small.


 

Eviscerate: to remove the internal organs or entrails of a person or an animal.


 

Vivisection: the practice of operating on living animals in order to gain knowledge of pathological or physiological processes.


 

Necrophilia: sexual feelings or sexual acts with dead bodies

Distinguished Correspondent
SPCAT
Posts: 111
Registered: ‎05-24-2010

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

If you try to please every one, you'll end up pleasing no one. So you might as well focus on pleasing yourself. I'm grateful to you for everything you done in the B&N Community your good at what you do and no need to defend it. Those people are only ignorant. People criticized what they do not understand for fear that we see how ignorant are they on the subject or is just simply old fashion envy. Now my word Veil - anything that conceals or covers.  many times I have seen this word to use to explain and  separate the world into different realms with doors or gates to enter what we would call the real world the one with not magic or amazing creatures in it just regular normal humans. 

" I will not be triumphed over " - Cleopatra
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paulgoatallen
Posts: 7,327
Registered: ‎08-16-2007

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

Just ran across the term "dolmen" in Laird Barron's new short story collection. Didn't know what one was so here is the definition:

 

 

Dolmen – a prehistoric megalithic tomb typically having two large upright stones and a capstone.

 

Cool word!

 

Paul

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky
Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

 


paulgoatallen wrote:

Just ran across the term "dolmen" in Laird Barron's new short story collection. Didn't know what one was so here is the definition:

 

 

Dolmen – a prehistoric megalithic tomb typically having two large upright stones and a capstone.

 

Cool word!

 

Paul


 

Talk about a word you don't normally hear outside of a art history class.:smileywink:

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

[ Edited ]

 


paulgoatallen wrote:

Just ran across the term "dolmen" in Laird Barron's new short story collection. Didn't know what one was so here is the definition:

 

 

Dolmen – a prehistoric megalithic tomb typically having two large upright stones and a capstone.

 

Cool word!

 

Paul


Here's words to go along with dolmen.

 

Tumulus (plural tumuli) - a mound of earth and stones raised over a grave or graves. Tumuli are also known as barrows, burial mounds, Hügelgrab or kurgans** and can be found throughout much of the world. A tumulus composed largely or entirely of stones is usually referred to as a cairn. A long barrow is a long tumulus, usually for numbers of burials. The method of burial may involve a dolmen*, a cist***, or a morturary enclosure, a mortuary house or a chamber tomb. (The word tumulus is Latin for 'mound' or 'small hill.) (Tumulus can also refer to a formation caused by the uplift of lava.)

 

* A dolmen, (aka a portal tomb, portal grave, and other variations described as a single chambered tomb ordinarily consisting of three or more upright megalithic/large stones supporting a horizontal cap stone primarily dating from the Neolithic, 4000 to 3000 BC), was usually covered with earth or smaller stones to form a barrow, but, in most instances, that covering has worn away revealing the stone skeleton. 

 

** Kurgan (Russian) - an east slavic word of Turkic origin for a tumulus, a type of burial mound or barrow heaped over a burial chamber, often of wood. Kurgans were built in the Neolithic, Bronze, Iron, Antiquity and Middle Ages. 

 

***cist or kist (Greek origin) - a small stone-built coffin-like box or ossurary used to hold the bodies of the dead.

Frequent Contributor
Gnomadic
Posts: 32
Registered: ‎04-05-2010
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Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

Ran across the word Gastronome the other day

Gastronome- a lover of good food and drink.  Gourmet, connoisseur of good food.

The fun thing is I found this while reading about zombies.  :smileyvery-happy:

 

 

When you find yourself falling into the seas of madness, DIVE!
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paulgoatallen
Posts: 7,327
Registered: ‎08-16-2007
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Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

 


Gnomadic wrote:

Ran across the word Gastronome the other day

Gastronome- a lover of good food and drink.  Gourmet, connoisseur of good food.

The fun thing is I found this while reading about zombies.  :smileyvery-happy:

 

 


 

 

Gastronome.... sounds like a gnome with gas...

 

Paul

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky
Moderator
paulgoatallen
Posts: 7,327
Registered: ‎08-16-2007

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

This from Kat Richardson's Labyrinth: (page 332) ophidian.

 

"...I shoved the muzzle up under the Pharaohn's ophidian chin."

 

definition: of, relating to, or resembling, snakes.

 

 

Great word – I'm going to try and include it in my lexicon!  :smileyhappy:

 

Paul

 

 

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky
Inspired Wordsmith
MADIS
Posts: 302
Registered: ‎02-27-2009
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Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

 


paulgoatallen wrote:

Just ran across the term "dolmen" in Laird Barron's new short story collection. Didn't know what one was so here is the definition:

 

 

Dolmen – a prehistoric megalithic tomb typically having two large upright stones and a capstone.

 

Cool word!

 

Paul


 

This cracked me up because my husband has built one on our backyard.  My mom just calls it a bench!

 

Author
KatRichardson
Posts: 262
Registered: ‎04-01-2008

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

Hey, there's a good one: Megalith! 

 

Huh: just discovered this is a 19th century back-formation from "Megalithic." I guess it means "really big rock thing," but it's just a guess.

 

Did we already have Stygian....?

Kat Richardson
http://katrichardson.com/
Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,279
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
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Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style


paulgoatallen wrote:

 


Gnomadic wrote:

Ran across the word Gastronome the other day

Gastronome- a lover of good food and drink.  Gourmet, connoisseur of good food.

The fun thing is I found this while reading about zombies.  :smileyvery-happy:

 

 


 

 

Gastronome.... sounds like a gnome with gas...

 

Paul


 

Most Zombies are Foodies..Only the Best..

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Inspired Contributor
Yonina_Dove
Posts: 45
Registered: ‎08-25-2010

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

I'm glad I ran across this thread!! It has made my morning!

 

I must say, I am a bit surprised out of all the Anita Blake references, no one has done Animator...so here goes!

 

Animator - A person who can raise the dead. Kind of like a necromancer but with less evil connotation.

“I like nonsense, it wakes up the brain cells. Fantasy is a necessary ingredient in living, It's a way of looking at life through the wrong end of a telescope. Which is what I do, And that enables me to laugh at life's realities.”
Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,279
Registered: ‎10-20-2008

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style


Yonina_Dove wrote:

I'm glad I ran across this thread!! It has made my morning!

 

I must say, I am a bit surprised out of all the Anita Blake references, no one has done Animator...so here goes!

 

Animator - A person who can raise the dead. Kind of like a necromancer but with less evil connotation.


 

I like  this Thread  a lot..Its Like being Back in School..on Planet BN...Glossary in Darkfever,,Karen Moning..was great for a "Newbie" like me, graduating in a few months.though..All invited ...Susan .. Thanks for the Animator defination..

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

[ Edited ]

These words are from Mike Carey's Thicker Than Water. If you want to improve your vocabularly while reading UF, then I suggest you read Carey. I intend to add another post in this thread listing seven to eight more words compliments of Carey.

 

Presentiment (use: I felt that twinge of ‘presentiment’….) (n.): an awareness of some event, especially an unpleasant event, before it takes place and before there is any reason to suspect it or know about it.  [Presentiment and premonition usually refers to information about future events perceived as emotions. The terms are usually used to denote a seemingly extrasensory process of perception, including clairvoyance. Psychological processes have also explained the phenomena.]

 

Unctuously (use: The duty officer arrived all too soon, introduced himself ‘unctuously’ to the distinguished visitors and took them away along the main corridor, out of sight.) (adverb form of the adjective ‘unctuous’) 1. attempting to charm or convince somebody in an unpleasantly suave, smug or smooth way 2. resembling or containing oil, fat, or grease. 3. soft and rich in texture and easily workable, especially through containing a high proportion of organic material. [Full of ‘unction‘ revealing or marked by a smug, ingrating and false earnestness or spirituality.]

 

Whitsun (use ‘Whitsun’ morning….) (adj.): relating to or happening on Whitsuntide or Whitsunday. [Whitsun: A festival originating from the pagan celebration of Summer's Day, the beginning of the summer half-year in Europe. In France and England it took on some characteristics of Beltane.  Whitsun was later incorporated into Pentecost in the Christian calendar which is the seventh Sunday after Easter and commemorates the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the disciples of Christ.]

 

Effluvium (use: There’s a damp, miserable ‘effluvium’ about the place…) (n.): an unpleasant smell or harmful fumes given off by something, usually waste or decaying matter (often used in the plural).

 

Tubercular (use: There’s a hectic, ‘tubercular’ beauty to them.) (adj.): 1. relating to, character of, or affected by tuberculosis 2. to be caused by the tubercle bacillus 3. taking the form of a small rounded swelling or nodule.

 

Ultramontane (use: ...‘ultramontane’ Catholic sect...) (adj.): 1. coming from or lying beyond mountains, especially beyond the Alps as viewed from ancient Rome 2. supporting the power and authority of the pope within the roman Catholic Church

 

Diachronic (use: Because I was tracing its voice through the muffled air, a ‘diachronic’ line graph expressing an equation whose solution was my split intestines.) (adj.): involving, or relating to the study of the development of something, especially a language, through time. [Diachronic or Diachronous is a technical term for something happening over time. It is used in several fields of research.)

 

Peristaltic (use: Violent shudders were running through him like ‘peristaltic’ waves.) (adj.): of or relating to peristalsis or having an action suggestive of peristalsis. [The noun 'Peristalsis' is a symmetrical contraction of muscles which propagates in a wave down the muscular tube. In humans, peristalsis is found in the contraction of smooth muscles to propel contents through the digestive tract. Earthworms use a similar mechanism to drive their locomotion. The word is derived from New Latin and comes from the Greek peristallein, "to wrap around," from peri-, "around" + stallein, "to place".]

 

 

P.S. Although I knew the meanings of most of these words, I loved their use in the novel. Some, however, I had to look up. 

 

Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,279
Registered: ‎10-20-2008
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Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

Thank you dainewt..Lots of work ,but appreciated.Sometimes one can get lost so to speak,and try and figure out the meaning pertaining to the sentence,the whole feeling of the book can get lost..Filing Away in My UF/paranormal Folder..Been reading on FirstLook "The Wake of Forgiveness"..Balancing with "Bloodfever."  cannot get enough of this series.The book TWOF,transports us to another place,time in America..Have a look..its has taken me out of my comfort zone,its so good..Susan

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Wordsmith
darkangel_1988
Posts: 883
Registered: ‎08-06-2010
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Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

Third Eye - The third eye (also known as the inner eye) is a mystical and esoteric concept referring in part to the ajna (brow) chakra in Eastern and Western spiritual traditions. It is also spoken of as the gate that leads within to inner realms and spaces of higher consciousness. In New Age spirituality, the third eye may alternately symbolize a state of enlightenment or the evocation of mental images having deeply personal spiritual or psychological significance. The third eye is often associated with visions, clairvoyance (which includes the ability to observe chakras and auras), precognition, and out-of-body experiences. People who have allegedly developed the capacity to utilize their third eyes are sometimes known as seers. :smileyhappy:

 

 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

[ Edited ]

These words are from Mike Carey’s

The Naming of the Beasts. I love the hard-boiled style and flowing narrative used in this supernatural mystery series and relish the words Carey uses in his prose. (Note, I had to look-up the words listed below in American and English (including slang) dictionaries. 

 

 

boracic (use p.51, ‘Spare a quid, guvnor?’ ……’Sorry, Love,’ I said, slowing involuntarily. ‘I’m boracic.’  (adj.) English slang meaning poor, having no money. Rhyming slang for 'skint', from boracic lint, an ointment, pronounced borrassic. Also heard as brassick. Example: <I can't come out for a drink, I'm boracic until I get paid next Friday> (Boracic lint was a type of medical dressing made from surgical lint that was soaked in a hot, saturated solution of borcic acid and then left to dry. It has been in use since at least the 19th century, but is now less commonly used. The term boracic lint, or often just "boracic", pronounced "brassic", is also used as Cockney rhyming slang for having no money. Boracic lint → skint.) Boracic: (Adj.) : term for boric acid.

 

synesthetic  (use p.57, Whatever it was that was moving up there, it was close enough to register on my death sense as a synesthetic thicket of jangling, discordant notes.) (adj. form of noun synesthesis) : (1) a concomitant of sensation; especially a subjective sensation or image of a sense (as of color) other than the one (as of sound) being stimulated (2) the condition marked by experience of such sensations

Origin New Latin, from syn- + -esthesia (as in anesthesia)

First Known Use: circa 1891

 

chthonic: (or chthonian) (use p. 65 Demons are chthonic powers, and they don't respond well to air travel.) (adj.) : of or relating to the underworld as described in Greek mythology: infernal, chthonic deities

Origin: Greek chthon-, chthōn earth

First Known Use: 1882

 

pontifex: (use p.98, The pontifex and psychopomp thing was one of J. J.’s favorite lines.) (n.) : a member of the highest council of priests in ancient Rome-- also call pontiff.

Origin Latin pontific-, pontifex, from pont-, pons bridge + facere to make

First Known Use: circa 1580

(P. S. Although I knew this referred to Catholic Church clergy in Rome, I didn’t know the exact meaning.)

 

aleph: (use p.117, Use of aleph sigils to stand in for candles, as in the Gottenburg ritual. (n) : the first letter of the Hebrew alphabet, transliterated as an apostrophe and pronounced as a glottal stop.

Origin Hebrew āleph, probably from eleph ox

First Known Use: 14th century

 

polyphonic (use p.130, Lisa’s music was a riotous polyphonic jumble.) (adj. form of noun polyphony referring to a style of musical composition employing to two or more simultaneous but relatively independent melodic line o0riginating from Greek polyphōnia variety of tones, from polyphōnos having many tones or voices, from poly- + phōnē voice) (1) consisting of two or more largely independent melodic lines, parts, or voices that sound simultaneously (2) used to describe a letter or character that may be pronounced in several different ways.

 

panjandrum (use p.142, She was working for Anton Fanke—the grand panjandrum.) (n.) : a powerful personage or pretentious (pompous) official

Originates from Grand Panjandrum, burlesque title of an imaginary personage in some nonsense lines by Samuel Foote

First Known Use: 1856

 

exophthalmic (use p.150, He had sandy-colored hair, a slightly exophthalmic stare and a physique that made a hatstand look broad in the beam.)  (adj. form of noun exophthalmos) :an abnormal protrusion of the eyeball

Origin: New Latin, from Greek exophthalmos having prominent eyes, from ex out + ophthalmos eye; akin to Greek ōps eye

First Known Use: 1872

(P.S. A nice way of saying he had ‘bug eyes’.)

 

psychomachia (use p.234, He stood up but didn’t leave, fighting visible psychomachia against his strong instinct to roll over and die for his queen.)  (n.) : (Psychology) conflict of the soul (See Noun Psychomachy meaning a conflict of the soul with the body.

psychomachy Obsolete, a conflict or battle between the soul and the body the soul)

Origin: Late Latin psȳchomachia, title of a poem by Prudentius (about 400), from Greek psukhē spirit + makhē battle]

 

abnegation (use p.246, …but the same pall of despair and abnegation hangs over them all, a psychic fog sublimed out of shipwrecked lives.)  (n.) : denial especially self-denial

Origin Late Latin abnegation-, abnegatio, from Latin abnegare to refute, from ab- + negare to deny

First use 14th century

 

genius loci (use p.246, For exorcists the genius loci is always a very real presence…) (n.): (1) the pervading spirit of a place (2) a tutelary deity of a place

Origin is Latin, First Use 1605

(I knew the genral but not the exact meaning of this word.)

 

dyspepsia (use p.278, It’s a dyspepsia of the soul, that will not go away. (n) : (1) acid indigestion (2) ill humor: disgruntlement

Latin from Greek, from dys- + pepsis digestion, from peptein, pessein to cook, digest.

First use 1706

 

spavined (use p.257, The pitched roof was sway-backed, like a spavined horse.) (adj.) : (1) affected with spavin (2) old and decrepit or lame

(The noun spavin refers to a swelling; especially: a bony enlargement of the hock of horse associated with strain.)  

Origin: Middle English spavayne, from Middle French espavin, alteration of Old French esparvains, probably of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German sparo sparrow (likened to a lump)

First Known Use: 15th century

 

meerschaum (p.258, A tall dresser held not plates and cups but more papers along with a meerschaum sculpture of a tram and a radio with a red plastic casing that had to be 1960s vintage.) (n.) : (1) a fine light white clay mineral that is a hydrous magnesium silicate found chiefly in Asia Minor and is used especially for tobacco pipes (2): a tobacco pipe of meerschaum

Origin: German, from Meer sea + schaum foam

First Known Use: 1784

 

en passant (use p.263, One or two of them took a kick at the bodywork en passant.) (adj.) : (1) in passing (2) used in chess of the capture of a pawn as it makes a first move of two squares by an enemy pawn that threatens the first of these squares

Origin French

First Known Use: 1665

(P.S. I knew what this meant, I just liked seeing it.)

 

cynosure (use p.268, But then the answer came stalking down the street towards me, the cynosure of all eyes – I counted six, including mine, the other sets belong to a homeless guy and a roosting pigeon on a window ledge.) (n) : (1) capitalized: the northern constellation Ursa Minor; also : north star (2) one that serves to direct or guide (3) a center of attraction or attention <turned an eyesore into a cynosure — Catherine Reynolds> Examples <with an unwavering commitment to equal rights for all as his only cynosure><that company is the cynosure for anyone wishing to make it in the music business>

Origin Middle French & Latin; Middle French, Ursa Minor, guide, from Latin cynosura Ursa Minor, from Greek kynosoura, from kynos oura, literally, dog's tail

First Known Use: 1565

 

louche (use p.319, Your louche charm is your selling point, Felix.) (Adj.) : not reputable or decent

Example <before gentrification, it was the sort of louche neighborhood where people went looking for illegal drugs>

Origin French, literally, cross-eyed, squint-eyed, from Latin luscus blind in one eye

First Known Use: 1819

(I always loved this word.)

 

etiolated (use p.349, And then the closing of the switch was like another lifetime, and the winding of the keys an etiolated eternity of running in a lonely place.) past tense of transitive verb etiolate : (1) to bleach and alter the natural development of (a green plant) by excluding sunlight (2) (a) to make pale (b) to deprive of natural vigor or make feeble

(eti·o·la·tion noun)

Example <the long, stressful days and sleepless nights gradually etiolated him>

Origin French étioler

First Known Use: 1791  

 

Maori mask (use p.349, His face was like a Maori mask that had been tossed off quickly for the tourist trade…) (n.) : (1) a member of a people living in New Zealand and on the Cook Islands. (2) the language of the Maori people, belonging to the Eastern branch of Austronesian languages.

Origin: Maori māori, literally, normal, ordinary

First Known Use: 1828

 

bolus (use p.389, His foot slammed into my stomach like a freight train coming through, knocking all the breath out of me in an explosive bolus as it actually lifted me off the ground.) (n.) : (1) a rounded mass or soft rounded ball as: (a) a very large pill or (b) : a soft mass of chewed food (2) (a) : a dose of a substance (as a drug) given intravenously (b) : a large dose of a substance given by injection for the purpose of rapidly achieving the needed therapeutic concentration in the bloodstream

Origin:Late Latin, from Greek bōlos lump

First Known Use: 1562

 

gimbals (use p. 413, Half a dozen men and women in white coats stood around a very fancy piece of apparatus – a flat surface, eight by four, mounted on a series of nested in gimbals so it could be adjusted to any height and any angle.)  (plural form of noun gimbal) : a device that permits a body to incline freely in any direction or suspends it so that it will remain level when its support is tipped —usually used in plural —called also gimbal ring

Origin: alteration of obsolete gemel double ring, from Middle English, from Anglo-French gemel, jomel, from Latin gemellus, diminutive of geminus

First Known Use: circa 1780

 

gormless (use p. 435 Its customized sides were emblazoned with Frank Dobson’s gormless, what-me-worry face.) (Adj. of chiefly British noun gormlessness) : lacking intelligence: stupid

Example <a comedy show that invariably portrays the British aristocracy as a bunch of gormless twits>

Origin: alteration of English dialect gaumless, from gaum attention, understanding (from Middle English gome, from Old Norse gaum, gaumr) + -less

First Known Use: 1883

 

liquescent (use p.442 And then, louder than either, I heard the lisquescent, insinuating crunch as Juliet drove her makeshift blade into Asmodeus’ chest.) (Adj.) : being or tending to become liquid: melting

Origin: Latin liquescent-, liquescens, present participle of liquescere to become fluid, inchoative of liquēre

First Known Use: circa 1727

(P.S. I knew what it meant, but I just like this word.)

 

mnemonic (use p.459, Sue was the mnemonic that let her remember who she was.)(adj., adverb is mnemonically) : (1) assisting or intended to assist memory; also: of or relating to mnemonics (2) of or relating to memory

Origin: Greek mnēmonikos, from mnēmōn mindful, from mimnēskesthai to remember

First Known Use: 1753

(Once again, I knew the word's definition, but loved seeing it.)

 

Londis (use p.460, There was a Londis open nearby, with a small but not too shabby selection of booze behind the counter.) Proper name for a retailer network in excess of 2200 stores and forecourt shops located throughout England, Scotland and Wales. 

Wordsmith
ThirstyFlea
Posts: 308
Registered: ‎06-05-2010

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

Here are a few words that gave me pause as I first delved into this genre:

 

Mage: An archaic word for magician; a magician or sorcerer.

 

Katana: a long, curved, single-edged sword traditionally used by Japanese Samurai (I've seen these introduced in a few different vampire books).

 

Ward(s): Magical protections- can be on a person or an object. (I'm sure there are better definitions of this, but that's the best I could do here!)

 

Golem: clay figures brought to life through magic who have no will of their own.

 

I'm sure I'll remember some more, so I'll be back.....

A book is a loaded gun in the house next door... Who knows who might be the target of the well-read man? ~ Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451
Wordsmith
ThirstyFlea
Posts: 308
Registered: ‎06-05-2010

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

I thought of a couple more!

Geis: pronounced gesh. A magical bond, usually involving a taboo or prohibition over personal behavior. (definition from Karen Chance's Claimed by Shadow)

 

Ley lines: ok, here I struggle to define- I've seen them mentioned in multiple books, but in each they are different. I guess they're magical lines of energy that can be travelled from one geographic place to another, and/or between worlds.

A book is a loaded gun in the house next door... Who knows who might be the target of the well-read man? ~ Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451