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Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

 


ThirstyFlea wrote:

 

Ley lines: ok, here I struggle to define- I've seen them mentioned in multiple books, but in each they are different. I guess they're magical lines of energy that can be travelled from one geographic place to another, and/or between worlds.


 

Ok big subject, start here and the reference 5 and 6 are both great books BTW

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ley_line

 

Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,279
Registered: ‎10-20-2008

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

The Greyfriar (Vampire Empire, Book 1)  I have only encountered Ley Line"s in one book so far  "Vampire Empire"The Greyfriar"..with a good explanation.... With 5 Stars for the book...I know I saw a Post about Book 2...Clay and Susan Griffith are exceptional writers.. TBear will have a look at the link .. Welcome Thirsty Flea,,,Susan

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Wordsmith
ThirstyFlea
Posts: 308
Registered: ‎06-05-2010
0 Kudos

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

Great! Thank you so much!

A book is a loaded gun in the house next door... Who knows who might be the target of the well-read man? ~ Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451
Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

[ Edited ]

Both these words are from Green-Eyed Demon. (I'm positive the word cthonic has been mentioned earlier, probably by me and the Felix Castor series by Mike Carey.) 

 

Chthonic: chthonic /ˈ(k)θɒnɪk/ (also chthonian /ˈ(k)θəʊnɪən/)

(adjective): relating to or inhabiting the underworld. (Word used in conjunction with magic to refer to dark/death/underworld magic) 

 

Chthonic (from Wikipedia): chthonic /ˈ(k)θɒnɪk/ (also chthonian /ˈ(k)θəʊnɪən/)

from Geek χθόνιος — chthonios, "in, under, or beneath the earth", from χθών — chthōn "earth"[1]; pertaining to the Earth; earthy; subterranean) designates, or pertains to, deities or spirits of the underworld, especially in relation to Greek religion.

Greek khthon is one of several words for "earth"; it typically refers to the interior of the soil, rather than the living surface of the land (as Gaia or Ge does) or the land as territory (as khora(χώρα) does). It evokes at once abundance and the grave.

The pronunciation is somewhat awkward for English speakers. Most dictionaries, such as the OED, state that the first two letters should be pronounced as [k], /ˈkθɒnɪk/; others, such as theAHD, record these letters as silent, /ˈθɒnɪk/. Note that the modern pronunciation of the Greek word "χθόνιος" is [xθoɲos], although the Classical Greek pronunciation would have been something similar to [kʰtʰonios].[2]

 

 

 

Irkalla (also Ir-Kalla, Irkalia) is the hell-like underworld from which there is no return. It is also called Arali, Kigal, Gizal, and the lower world. Irkalla is ruled by the goddess Ereshkigal and her consort, the death god Nergal (in Babylonian mythology).

Irkalla was originally another name for Ereshkigal, who ruled the underworld alone until Nergal was sent to the underworld and seduced Ereshkigal (in Babylonian mythology). Both the deity and the location were called Irkalla, much like how Hades in Greek mythology is both the name of the underworld and the god who ruled it.

 

The Sumerian netherworld was a place for the bodies of the dead to exist after death. One passed through the seven gates on their journey through the portal to the netherworld leaving articles of clothing and adornment at each gate, not necessarily by choice as there was a guardian at each gate to extract a toll for one's passage and to keep one from going the wrong way. The living spirits of the dead are only spoken of in connection with this netherworld when someone has been placed here before they are dead or wrongly killed and can be saved. The bodies of the dead decompose in this afterlife, as they would in the world above.

As the subterranean destination for all who die, Irkalla is similar to Sheol of the Hebrew Bible or Hades of classic Greek mythology. It is different from more hopeful visions of the afterlife that later appeared in Platonic philosophy, Judaism, and Christianity.

 

Irkalla (also Ir-Kalla, Irkalia) (proper noun, definitaion taken from Wikipedia) is the hell-like underworld from which there is no return. It is also called Arali, Kigal, Gizal, and the lower world. Irkalla is ruled by the goddess Ereshkigal and her consort, the death god Nergal (in Babylonian mythology).

 

Irkalla was originally another name for Ereshkigal, who ruled the underworld alone until Nergal was sent to the underworld and seduced Ereshkigal (in Babylonian mythology). Both the deity and the location were called Irkalla, much like how Hades in Greek mythology is both the name of the underworld and the god who ruled it.

 

The Sumerian netherworld was a place for the bodies of the dead to exist after death. One passed through the seven gates on their journey through the portal to the netherworld leaving articles of clothing and adornment at each gate, not necessarily by choice as there was a guardian at each gate to extract a toll for one's passage and to keep one from going the wrong way. The living spirits of the dead are only spoken of in connection with this netherworld when someone has been placed here before they are dead or wrongly killed and can be saved. The bodies of the dead decompose in this afterlife, as they would in the world above.

As the subterranean destination for all who die, Irkalla is similar to Sheol of the Hebrew Bible or Hades of classic Greek mythology. It is different from more hopeful visions of the afterlife that later appeared in Platonic philosophy, Judaism, and Christianity.

Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

[ Edited ]

These words are from Etched in Bone (Maker's Song Series #4).

 

(Definitions have been taken from Wikipedia and/or the handy 'Glossary' at the beginning of the book.)

 

1) Morningstar (or Morning Star): (n.) the name given to the planet Venus when it appears in the east before sunrise. It also may refer to specific people, places and things including Lucifer.

 

Traditionally, Lucifer is a name that in English generally refers to the devil before being cast from heaven, although this is not the original meaning of the term. In Latin, from which the English word is derived, Lucifer means "light-bearer" (from the words lucem ferre). It was the name given to the dawn appearance of the planet Venus, which heralds daylight. For this meaning, English generally uses the names "Morning Star" or "Day Star", and rarely "Lucifer".

The Bible does not name the devil as Lucifer. The use of this name in reference to the devil stems from an interpretation of Isaiah 14:3-20, a passage that does not speak of any fallen angel but of the defeat of a particular Babylonian King, to whom it gives a title that refers to what in English is called the Day Star or Morning Star (in Latin, lucifer).[2] In 2 Peter 1:19 and elsewhere, the same Latin word lucifer is used to refer to the Morning Star, with no relation to the devil. It is only in post-New Testament times that the Latin word Lucifer was often used as a name for the devil, both in religious writing and in fiction, especially when referring to him prior to his fall from Heaven.

(The word in the original text in Hebrew is הֵילֵל (transliteration: helel; definition: a shining oneStrong's Hebrew Numbers, 1966).)

 

 

2) Gehenna (n.) A Jewish term loosely analogous to the concept of "Hell".  (Disambiguation:  Gehenna is the Jewish version of Hell, named after the Hinnom valley outside of Jerusalem)

 

Valley of Hinnom, c. 1900

Gehenna (Greek γέεννα), Gehinnom (Rabbinical Hebrew: גהנום, גהנם,) and Yiddish Gehinnam, are terms derived from a place outside ancient Jerusalem known in the Hebrew Bible as the Valley of the Son of Hinnom (Hebrew: גֵיא בֶן־הִנֹּם or גיא בן-הינום); one of the two principal valleys surrounding the Old City.

In the Hebrew Bible, the site was initially where apostate Israelites and followers of various Ba'als and false gods, including Moloch, sacrificed their children by fire (2 Chr. 28:3, 33:6; Jer. 7:31, 19:2-6).

In both Rabbinical Jewish and Early Christian writing, Gehenna was a destination of the wicked. This is different from the more neutral Sheol/Hades, the abode of the dead, though English Bibles traditionally translate both with the Anglo-Saxon concept Hell.

English "Gehenna" represents the Greek Geenna (γεεννα) found in the New Testament, a phonetic transcription of Aramaic Gēhannā (ܓܗܢܐ), equivalent to the Hebrew Ge Hinnom, literally "Valley of Hinnom". This was known in the Old Testament as Gai Ben-Hinnom, literally the "Valley of the son of Hinnom", and in the Talmud as Gehinnam (גהנם) or Gehinnom (גהנום). In the Qur'an, Jahannam (جهنم) is a place of torment for sinners or the Islamic equivalent of Hell.[1]

 

 

 

3) Elohim (n.) (disambiguiation Elohim is a Hebrew word for "gods" and a name of the God of Israel in the Hebrew Bible.)

Elohim (as a Hebrew word) (אֱלהִים) is a plural formation of eloah, the latter being an expanded form of the Northwest Semitic noun il (אֱל, ʾēl [1]). It is the usual word for "God" in the Hebrew Bible, referring with singular verbs both to the one God of Israel, and also in a few examples to other singular pagan deities. With plural verbs the word is also used as a true plural with the meaning "gods".[2]

The singular forms eloah (אלוה) and el (אֱל) are used as proper names or as generics, in which case they are interchangeable with elohim.[3]

 

Elohim (s. and pl.) is defined by the Etched in Bone Glossary as the beings mythologized as the fallen angels also referred to as the Fallen. 

 

4)  Nephilim (n) beings mentioned twice in the Hebrew Bible; in Genesis 6:4 and Numbers 13:33. Traditions about the Nephilim are also found in a number of other Jewish and Christian writings. (disambiguation: Nephilim are offspring of humans and sons of God mentioned in the Bible.

 

The term "Nephilim" occurs just twice in the Hebrew Bible, both in the Torah. The first is Genesis 6:1-4, immediately before the Noah's ark story:

1. When men began to increase in number on the earth and daughters were born to them,

2. the sons of God saw that the daughters of men were beautiful, and they married any of them they chose.

3. Then the LORD said, "My Spirit will not contend with man forever, for he is mortal; his days will be a hundred and twenty years."

4. The Nephilim were on the earth in those days—and also afterward—when the sons of God went to the daughters of men and had children by them. They were the heroes of old, men of renown.

The second is Numbers 13:32-33, where the Hebrew spies report that they have seen fearsome giants in Canaan:

32. And they spread among the Israelites a bad report about the land they had explored. They said, "The land we explored devours those living in it. All the people we saw there are of great size.

33. We saw the Nephilim there (the descendants of Anak come from the Nephilim). We seemed like grasshoppers in our own eyes, and we looked the same to them."

 

Etymology This subject also relates to the etymology and meaning of the phrase sons of God.

"Nephilim" (נְפִילִים) probably derives from the Hebrew root npl (נָפַל), "to fall" which also includes "to cause to fall" and "to kill, to ruin". The Brown-Driver-Briggs Lexicon gives the meaning as "giants"[1] Robert Baker Girdlestone[2] argued the word comes from the Hiphil causative stem. Adam Clarke took it as passive, "fallen", "apostates". Ronald Hendel states that it is a passive form "ones who have fallen", equivalent grammatically to paqid "one who is appointed" (i.e. overseer), asir, "one who is bound", (i.e. prisoner) etc.[3][4]

 

(Note there are several interpretations as to the nature/origin of the beings referred to as Nephilim.)

 

Nephilim is defined by the Etched in Bone Glossary as the offspring resulting from fallen and mortal unions.

 

 

(Note the next two words seem to have no definitions outside The Maker's Song series. Further, there are several words particular to this series which appear in the Glossary of Etched in Bone.)

 

5) Creawdwr: (n.) defined by the Etched in Bone glossary as creator; maker/unmaker; and extremely rare branch of the Elohim believed to be extinct; Last know creawdwr was Yahweh.

 

6) Wybrcathl: (n.) defined by the Etched in Bone glossary as a Fallen/Elohim word for sky-song. 

Inspired Wordsmith
Sovereign_Queen
Posts: 283
Registered: ‎11-28-2008

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

Wangst:  the whiney, brooding, angst suffered by so many paranormal teens, especially those of the Vampiric persuasion. 

 

~Suzi

Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

Immurement: a form of execution where a person is walled up within a building and left to die from starvation or dehydration. This is distinct from being buried alive, in which the victim typically dies of asphyxiation.

 

(If you click on this link, immurement, you will see Wikipedia examples of immurement from history, legend, folklore and literature. I recently read  Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado" were the murder immures a fellow nobleman in the catacombs under his family villa.)  

Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

 


dalnewt wrote:

Immurement: a form of execution where a person is walled up within a building and left to die from starvation or dehydration. This is distinct from being buried alive, in which the victim typically dies of asphyxiation.

 

(If you click on this link, immurement, you will see Wikipedia examples of immurement from history, legend, folklore and literature. I recently read  Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado" were the murder immures a fellow nobleman in the catacombs under his family villa.)  


 

Stumble upon

 

Obuliette - wiki lists it as

An oubliette is a form of dungeon which was accessible only from a hatch in a high ceiling.

 

But the word in French means "hole of forgetting".

 

For a while it was French medieval high fashion to have an obuliette in your castle often below the entryway of the dinning hall or out in your courtyard. Just so the smells would inflict more pain upon the victim sealed in the pit.

 

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

 


TiggerBear wrote:

 


dalnewt wrote:

Immurement: a form of execution where a person is walled up within a building and left to die from starvation or dehydration. This is distinct from being buried alive, in which the victim typically dies of asphyxiation.

 

(If you click on this link, immurement, you will see Wikipedia examples of immurement from history, legend, folklore and literature. I recently read  Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado" were the murder immures a fellow nobleman in the catacombs under his family villa.)  


 

Stumble upon

 

Obuliette - wiki lists it as

An oubliette is a form of dungeon which was accessible only from a hatch in a high ceiling.

 

But the word in French means "hole of forgetting".

 

For a while it was French medieval high fashion to have an obuliette in your castle often below the entryway of the dinning hall or out in your courtyard. Just so the smells would inflict more pain upon the victim sealed in the pit.

 

 


The last time I read about an oubliette was in Brent Week's second book of the Night Angel Trilogy, 

Shadow's Edge (Night Angel Trilogy #2).  

 

From my understanding oubliette is derived from a French word of the same spelling which literally means 'forgotten place' and originates from the French root oublier, "to forget," as it was used for those prisoners the captors wished to forget. Strangely, oubliette is closer in meaning to the English word dungeon than the Old French word donjon. Here's the etymology from Wikipedia:

 

The word dungeon comes from Old French donjon (also spelt dongon), which in its earliest usage, meant "a keep, the main tower of a castle which formed the final defensive position to which the garrison could retreat when outer fortifications were overcome".

 

The first recorded instance of the word in English near the beginning of the 14th century also meant "an underground prison cell beneath the castle keep". While some sources cite Medieval Latin dom(i)niōn- "property" (and ultimately dominus "lord") as the original source, it is more likely that the word derives from the Frankish *dungjo, *dungjon-("dungeon, vault, bower"), from Proto-Germanic *dungjōn, *dungō ("a cover, enclosed space, treasury, vault"), from Proto-Indo-European *dhengh- ("to cover, hide, conceal")[1], related to Old High German tung ("a cellar, underground living quarter"), Old English dung ("a dungeon, prison"), and Old Norse dyngja ("a lady's bower"). In English, a dungeon now usually only signifies the sense of underground prison or oubliette, typically in a basement of a castle, whereas the alternate spelling donjon is generally reserved for the original meaning.

 

In French the term donjon still refers to a "keep", and the term oubliette is a more appropriate translation of English "dungeon"Donjon is therefore a false friend to "dungeon" (for instance, the game "Dungeons and Dragons" is titled "Donjons et Dragons" in its French editions).

An oubliette (from the French oubliette, literally "forgotten place") was a form of dungeon which was accessible only from a hatch in a high ceiling. The word comes from the same root as the French oublier, "to forget," as it was used for those prisoners the captors wished to forget.

The earliest use of oubliette in French dates back to 1374, but its earliest adoption in English is Walter Scott's Ivanhoe in 1819: 'The place was utterly dark—the oubliette, as I suppose, of their accursed convent.'[2]There is no reason to suspect that this particular place of incarceration was more than a flight of romantic elaboration on existing unpleasant places of confinement described during the Gothic Revival period.

Distinguished Bibliophile
TiggerBear
Posts: 9,489
Registered: ‎02-12-2008
0 Kudos

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

 


dalnewt wrote:

 


TiggerBear wrote:

 


dalnewt wrote:

Immurement: a form of execution where a person is walled up within a building and left to die from starvation or dehydration. This is distinct from being buried alive, in which the victim typically dies of asphyxiation.

 

(If you click on this link, immurement, you will see Wikipedia examples of immurement from history, legend, folklore and literature. I recently read  Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado" were the murder immures a fellow nobleman in the catacombs under his family villa.)  


 

Stumble upon

 

Obuliette - wiki lists it as

An oubliette is a form of dungeon which was accessible only from a hatch in a high ceiling.

 

But the word in French means "hole of forgetting".

 

For a while it was French medieval high fashion to have an obuliette in your castle often below the entryway of the dinning hall or out in your courtyard. Just so the smells would inflict more pain upon the victim sealed in the pit.

 

 


The last time I read about an oubliette was in Brent Week's second book of the Night Angel Trilogy, 

Shadow's Edge (Night Angel Trilogy #2).  

 

From my understanding oubliette is derived from a French word of the same spelling which literally means 'forgotten place' and originates from the French root oublier, "to forget," as it was used for those prisoners the captors wished to forget. Strangely, oubliette is closer in meaning to the English word dungeon than the Old French word donjon. Here's the etymology from Wikipedia:

 

The word dungeon comes from Old French donjon (also spelt dongon), which in its earliest usage, meant "a keep, the main tower of a castle which formed the final defensive position to which the garrison could retreat when outer fortifications were overcome".

 

The first recorded instance of the word in English near the beginning of the 14th century also meant "an underground prison cell beneath the castle keep". While some sources cite Medieval Latin dom(i)niōn- "property" (and ultimately dominus "lord") as the original source, it is more likely that the word derives from the Frankish *dungjo, *dungjon-("dungeon, vault, bower"), from Proto-Germanic *dungjōn, *dungō ("a cover, enclosed space, treasury, vault"), from Proto-Indo-European *dhengh- ("to cover, hide, conceal")[1], related to Old High German tung ("a cellar, underground living quarter"), Old English dung ("a dungeon, prison"), and Old Norse dyngja ("a lady's bower"). In English, a dungeon now usually only signifies the sense of underground prison or oubliette, typically in a basement of a castle, whereas the alternate spelling donjon is generally reserved for the original meaning.

 

In French the term donjon still refers to a "keep", and the term oubliette is a more appropriate translation of English "dungeon"Donjon is therefore a false friend to "dungeon" (for instance, the game "Dungeons and Dragons" is titled "Donjons et Dragons" in its French editions).

An oubliette (from the French oubliette, literally "forgotten place") was a form of dungeon which was accessible only from a hatch in a high ceiling. The word comes from the same root as the French oublier, "to forget," as it was used for those prisoners the captors wished to forget.

The earliest use of oubliette in French dates back to 1374, but its earliest adoption in English is Walter Scott's Ivanhoe in 1819: 'The place was utterly dark—the oubliette, as I suppose, of their accursed convent.'[2]There is no reason to suspect that this particular place of incarceration was more than a flight of romantic elaboration on existing unpleasant places of confinement described during the Gothic Revival period.


Yep that's the page. Losts of french poety tales that talk about oubiettes. you'll run into to it reading classic gothic stories a lot.

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

Putridity:

1(a) being in a state of putrefaction : rotten

  (b) : of, relating to, or characteristic of putrefaction : foul <a putrid odor>

2(a) : morally corrupt 

  (b) : totally objectionable

pu·trid·i·ty noun

—   pu·trid·ly adverb

 

Putrefaction: (n.) \ˌpyü-trə-ˈfak-shən\

 

the decomposition of organic matter; especially : the typically anaerobic splitting of proteins by bacteria and fungi with the formation of foul-smelling incompletely oxidized products

 

 

— pu·tre·fac·tive adjective

 

Origin of PUTREFACTION

Middle English putrefaccion, from Late Latin putrefaction-, putrefactio, from Latin putrefacere

First Known Use: 14th century

 

Most people are familiar with the adjective putrid, but I loved Poe's usage of the noun putridity in the last paragraph of "The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar" as follows:

 

   As I rapidly made the mesmeric passes, amid ejaculations of "dead! dead!" absolutely bursting from the tongue and not the lips of the sufferer, his whole frame at once--within the space of a single minute, or even less, shrunk--crumbled, absolutely rotted away beneath my hands. Upon the bed, before the whole company, there lay a nearly liquid mass of loathsome--of detestable putridity. (Emphasis added)

Contributor
RavynSky
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎01-08-2011

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

[ Edited ]

  Sorry should have read posts prior to mine appears this word has been posted already :smileysad:

 

Obuliette was a  form of torture, I was unfamiliar with that I came across in "A Discovery of Witches" and had to look it up while reading the book. Here is what I found. Apparently I need to read up further on torture lol. Either way love the word!

Definition of OUBLIETTE

: a dungeon with an opening only at the top
Origin of OUBLIETTE
French, from Middle French, from oublier to forget, from Old French oblier, from Vulgar Latin *oblitare, frequentative of Latin oblivisci to forget — more at oblivion
First Known Use: 1819
Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009
0 Kudos

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

 


RavynSky wrote:

  Sorry should have read posts prior to mine appears this word has been posted already :smileysad:

 

Obuliette was a  form of torture, I was unfamiliar with that I came across in "A Discovery of Witches" and had to look it up while reading the book. Here is what I found. Apparently I need to read up further on torture lol. Either way love the word!

Definition of OUBLIETTE

: a dungeon with an opening only at the top
Origin of OUBLIETTE
French, from Middle French, from oublier to forget, from Old French oblier, from Vulgar Latin *oblitare, frequentative of Latin oblivisci to forget — more at oblivion
First Known Use: 1819

It's the effort that counts.:smileyhappy:

 

New User
KBowdry
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎06-12-2011

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

dempire--demon vampire

curtesy Kresley Cole

Distinguished Bibliophile
Darkkin
Posts: 2,224
Registered: ‎08-15-2009

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

Plot: An idea, rough and unformed as of the moment of its implementation, having all the appearances of a plan, but relying on an overdose of sheer dumb luck. - Epic, a Mockery, as Recorded by Darkkin, the Lady of Tedious

'Of wings and words and dancing milkweed seeds...'

Distinguished Wordsmith
Fleetfoot
Posts: 495
Registered: ‎05-14-2011

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

Quixotic: To dream an impossible dream.  To go where the brave dare not follow.  To press on when all hope is utterly lost and the world threatens to crumble in upon itself.  To take a leap of faith and know we can fly even after a massive, brutal fall.  To continue on in the face of pain and an angry heart...To believe in something, anything so blindly, so faithfully that those about you curse you as a fool, but deep down you know the truth, the unshakable childlike hope continues to burn like a star and carries you onward in the face of taunts, jeers, and skepticism.  To dream an impossible dream and make it real.

 

- The Man of La Mancha and Fleetfoot, the Murmur

'Posted: Do not feed the Trolls, not even reindeer flattened fruitcake...Feeding of Trolls will result in gnome revolts, gremlin induced chaos, and other strangeness...' - Darkkin, the Tedious
Moderator
paulgoatallen
Posts: 7,327
Registered: ‎08-16-2007

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

I LOVE this thread, guys – in fact, I'm writing a blog revolving around it right now! I'll post it in Explorations later today....  :smileyhappy:

 

Paul

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky
Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,279
Registered: ‎10-20-2008

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

[ Edited ]

 PGA ,I do as well among others use this thread....As I graduated from Newbie to,not sure what the next step up is,.  : )..and The UF/Paranormal books I never thought I would read,..it has been a wonderful journey for me...TBear Started this thread.,oops you did.PGA But still miss her ..Great  Idea to Blog about it....You just wake up in the middle  of the night and these Ideas just come to you......Suze/Vermont.


paulgoatallen wrote:

I LOVE this thread, guys – in fact, I'm writing a blog revolving around it right now! I'll post it in Explorations later today....  :smileyhappy:

 

Paul


 

Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
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SciFiCanuck
Posts: 2,075
Registered: ‎03-18-2008

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style


TiggerBear wrote:

 


dalnewt wrote:

Immurement: a form of execution where a person is walled up within a building and left to die from starvation or dehydration. This is distinct from being buried alive, in which the victim typically dies of asphyxiation.

 

(If you click on this link, immurement, you will see Wikipedia examples of immurement from history, legend, folklore and literature. I recently read  Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado" were the murder immures a fellow nobleman in the catacombs under his family villa.)  


 

Stumble upon

 

Obuliette - wiki lists it as

An oubliette is a form of dungeon which was accessible only from a hatch in a high ceiling.

 

But the word in French means "hole of forgetting".

 

For a while it was French medieval high fashion to have an obuliette in your castle often below the entryway of the dinning hall or out in your courtyard. Just so the smells would inflict more pain upon the victim sealed in the pit.

 

 


Hmmmm, it seems to me this word was in the Morgan Kingsley series by Jenna Black.  Lugh tossed Morgan into a "virtual" one so she would be sheilded from what he did while taking over her body.  :-)

My name is Teresa, and I'm a bookaholic
Current book(s): Labyrinth of Stars (Hunter Kiss #5) by Marjorie M. Liu
Just finished: The Undead Pool by Kim Harrison (The Hollows #12)
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paulgoatallen
Posts: 7,327
Registered: ‎08-16-2007

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

Okay, here it is. I thought it was humorous – but will others get my sense of humor? I hope so....

 

Paul

 

http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/Explorations-The-BN-SciFi-and/Put-That-In-Your-Oubliette-and-...

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky