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Wordsmith
3monstersmom
Posts: 871
Registered: ‎03-04-2009

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style


paulgoatallen wrote:

Okay, here it is. I thought it was humorous – but will others get my sense of humor? I hope so....

 

Paul

 

http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/Explorations-The-BN-SciFi-and/Put-That-In-Your-Oubliette-and-...


It was very funny Paul.  I think the mental image of a /Vulcan with too much fiber in his diet' will be sticking with me for awhile.:smileyvery-happy:

 

Screw the post office - Normal is boring.

Distinguished Bibliophile
Darkkin
Posts: 2,224
Registered: ‎08-15-2009

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

Blind Hope: Eyes that see in the darkest reaches, the bleakest times.  A hand that reaches out and leads the way when all others have surrendered.  The voice that whispers, onward, onward, onward.  The heart that never lets you fall...

 

- The Traveller, a Chronicle of the Darkkin

'Of wings and words and dancing milkweed seeds...'

Author
Zkullis
Posts: 252
Registered: ‎07-21-2011

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style


dalnewt wrote:

 

4)  Nephilim (n) beings mentioned twice in the Hebrew Bible; in Genesis 6:4 and Numbers 13:33. Traditions about the Nephilim are also found in a number of other Jewish and Christian writings. (disambiguation: Nephilim are offspring of humans and sons of God mentioned in the Bible.

 

The term "Nephilim" occurs just twice in the Hebrew Bible, both in the Torah. The first is Genesis 6:1-4, immediately before the Noah's ark story:

1. When men began to increase in number on the earth and daughters were born to them,

2. the sons of God saw that the daughters of men were beautiful, and they married any of them they chose.

3. Then the LORD said, "My Spirit will not contend with man forever, for he is mortal; his days will be a hundred and twenty years."

4. The Nephilim were on the earth in those days—and also afterward—when the sons of God went to the daughters of men and had children by them. They were the heroes of old, men of renown.

The second is Numbers 13:32-33, where the Hebrew spies report that they have seen fearsome giants in Canaan:

32. And they spread among the Israelites a bad report about the land they had explored. They said, "The land we explored devours those living in it. All the people we saw there are of great size.

33. We saw the Nephilim there (the descendants of Anak come from the Nephilim). We seemed like grasshoppers in our own eyes, and we looked the same to them."

 

Etymology This subject also relates to the etymology and meaning of the phrase sons of God.

"Nephilim" (נְפִילִים) probably derives from the Hebrew root npl (נָפַל), "to fall" which also includes "to cause to fall" and "to kill, to ruin". The Brown-Driver-Briggs Lexicon gives the meaning as "giants"[1] Robert Baker Girdlestone[2] argued the word comes from the Hiphil causative stem. Adam Clarke took it as passive, "fallen", "apostates". Ronald Hendel states that it is a passive form "ones who have fallen", equivalent grammatically to paqid "one who is appointed" (i.e. overseer), asir, "one who is bound", (i.e. prisoner) etc.[3][4]

 

(Note there are several interpretations as to the nature/origin of the beings referred to as Nephilim.)

 

Nephilim is defined by the Etched in Bone Glossary as the offspring resulting from fallen and mortal unions.

 

 


"A Word A Day" is one of my favorite message strings to read on this board!  There is so much good stuff. 

 

As I was reading through, I found dalnewt's post and took more than a little pleasure in reading about the Nephilim.  I think the Nephilim has great yet almost untapped monster-potential. 

 

If I can throw in a shameless plug, my novel has a few Nephilim in it, although they have a slightly different angle than that of Orthodox Judaism.

 

Great stuff!!

 

Zack...

Smite the Damned. http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Smite-The-Damned/Zack-Kullis/e/2940012784445 The sequel, Realm Crossing, to be released soon.
Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

From Kat Richardson's Downpour (Greywalker Series #6)  

 

(1) saponify |verb ( -fies, -fied) Chemistry: turn (fat or oil) into soap by reaction with an alkali [as adj. (saponified) saponified vegetable oils.

• convert (any ester) into an alcohol and a metal salt by alkaline hydrolysis.saponifiable-adjective; saponification noun

 

*Used within Downpour to refer to 'saponified' corpse that floated to the surface of a lake after turning to soap due in the alkaline depths of that lake. 

 

(2) Yaoguai (妖怪 pinyin yāoguài) or yaomo (妖魔 yāomó, literally, "demon") or yaojing (妖精 yāojīng, literally, "sprite" or "seductive"): a Chinese term that generally means "demon". Yaoguai are mostlymalevolent animal spirits or fallen celestial beings that have acquired magical powers through the practice of Taoism. The evil ones are usually referred to as guài (literally, "freak") or  (literally, "demon") in Chinese. Their greatest goal is achieving immortality and thus deification. In Journey to the West, the demons seek this mostly by the abduction and consumption of a holy man (in this case, Xuanzang).

 

Not all yaojing are actually demons; some others are of quite unusual origins. In the case of Bai Gu Jing, she was a skeleton that became such a demon. Many yaojing are fox spirits, or according to the Journey to the West, pets of the deities. There are also yaoguai kings (mówáng) that command a number of lesser demon minions.

In Chinese folklore, the Chinese hell (Di Yu) is a place that is populated by various demonic spawns. Most of these demons are influenced by the Indian rakshasa or yaksha and therefore bear some similarity with the Japanese oni.

In Japanese, yaoguai are known as yōkai (actually, the term is a loanword from Chinese; the native Japanese equivalent, sometimes written with the same kanji, is mononoke).

Famous yaoguai in Chinese mythology:

Note: Sun Wukong uses this term often to insult his (demonic) adversaries.

Yaoguai in popular culture
  • The 2008 video game Fallout 3 features mutated bears identified as Yao Guai. These creatures roam the game's setting, a post-nuclear Washington, D.C. and surrounding areas of Maryland and Virginia (the Capital Wasteland.) They attack both the player and various non-player characters. One of the in-game radio stations broadcasts an occasional public service announcement, reminding listeners "don't feed the Yao Guai".

*An avaricious yaoguai is a character in Downpour and less sentient beast demons are referred to in that book as 'guai'.

 

3) Huli jing (Chinese狐狸精;pinyinhúli jīng; literally "fox spirit") in Chinese mythology are fox spiritsthat are akin to European fairies. Huli jing can be either good spirits or bad spirits. Nine-tailed fox, from the Qing edition of the Shan Hai Jing

 

A banished 'Huli jing' is referred to in Downpour.

Fox spirit (Fox spirit or fox demon may refer to:

  • Huli jing, a Chinese fox known for causing mischief and seducing humans
  • Kitsune, a Japanese fox which can be either benevolentormischievous
  • Kumiho,anevil Korean fox over 1,000 years old,whichseduces and kills human men

The term is also sometimes used to refer to the literal spirit of a fox in totemist or shamanist beliefs.

Author
Zkullis
Posts: 252
Registered: ‎07-21-2011

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

Saponification is a great word for anybody that reads or writes about the dead. 

 

The formation of this stuff, also called grave wax, is not always a pretty thing to see (or smell for that matter).  One problem it causes is that it really complicates the process of trying to determine a fairly accurate estimate of the time of death in an investigation.

 

Another word for this waxy formation is adipocere.

 

 

Zack...

Smite the Damned. http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Smite-The-Damned/Zack-Kullis/e/2940012784445 The sequel, Realm Crossing, to be released soon.
Author
Zkullis
Posts: 252
Registered: ‎07-21-2011

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

I think it is time to get this thread going again.  It is much too fun to let lie by the wayside.

Since I am trying to bring this thread back to life, I thought some voodoo-related words would be appropriate.

 

Palo Mayombe - (often called "Palo") Considered by some to be the world's most powerful and feared form of black magic.  It originated in the Congo Basin of Central Africa, where many of its practitioners were enslaved and brought over to Cuba, the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico.  Ritualistic chants and invocations are predominantly done in a mixture of Kikongo and Spanish.  While many scoff at the purported dark nature of Palo, it can be plainly seen in many of the commonly used items.  For example, the Nganga, or Prenda, is a consecrated vessel or an altar that is made with sticks, sacred earth, human remains, bones and other items that change according to what is being done.  Palo Mayombe's close cousins are Quimbanda and Candomblé, both practiced widely in Brazil.  Animal sacrifice is a very common part of Quimbanda and Candomblé. 

 

 

Smite the Damned. http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Smite-The-Damned/Zack-Kullis/e/2940012784445 The sequel, Realm Crossing, to be released soon.
Author
Zkullis
Posts: 252
Registered: ‎07-21-2011

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

 

Xenoglossythe putative phenomenon in which a person is able to speak a language that he or she could not have acquired by natural means. For example, a person who speaks German fluently and as a native would, but has never studied German, been to a German-speaking country, or associated with German-speakers, would be said to exhibit xenoglossy.  (Often associated with demonic possession)

 

Maleficium; another word for sorcery; is a Latin term meaning "wrongdoing" or "mischief" and is used to describe malevolent, dangerous, or harmful magic, "evildoing" or "malevolent sorcery". In general, the term applies to any magical act intended to cause harm or death to people or property.

 

 

Zack...

Smite the Damned. http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Smite-The-Damned/Zack-Kullis/e/2940012784445 The sequel, Realm Crossing, to be released soon.
Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

[ Edited ]

Here are some of the types of "Sea Fae" named at the start of One Salt Sea (October Daye Series #5) by Seanan McGuire.  Note, some of the sea faeries listed below were created by the author while others have roots in various legends. 

 

Asrai: (per the book) tiny, silver-haired people who could pass for children and weave magical underwater wards.

[Per Wikipedia, Asrai are a type of aquatic fairy from English Folklore  similar in some ways to mermaids, nixies, selkies, sirens or morgens. Some sources describe them as timid and shy, standing only between 2 and 4 feet tall, while others depict them as tall and lithe. They are said to look like beautiful young maidens, sometimes as young as children, while actually being hundreds of years old. They may have webbed hands and feet, resembling some descriptions of selkies.]


Cephali: (per the book) undersea faerie with a human shaped upper body and lower half resembling an octopus with multiple tentacles.

[Per Wikipedia, octopi are cephalpods. Cephalopod is any member of the molluscan class Cephalopoda (Greek pluralΚεφαλόποδα (kephalópoda); "head-feet"). These exclusively marine animals are characterized by bilateral body symmetry, a prominent head, and a set of arms or tentacles (muscular hydrostats) modified from the primitive molluscan foot. Fishermen sometimes call them inkfish, referring to their common ability to squirt ink. The study of cephalopods is a branch of malacology known as teuthology.] 


Cetace: (per the book) a type of deep water undersea faerie with the upper body of a person and the lower body and dorsal fin of large aquatic mammals such as killer and gray whales.

[Per Wikipedia The order of Cetacea includes the marine mammals commonly known as whales, dolphins, and porpoises. ]

[Cetaceans are the mammals best adapted to aquatic life. Their body is fusiform (spindle-shaped). The forelimbs are modified into flippers. The tiny hindlimbs are vestigial; they do not attach to the backbone and are hidden within the body. The tail has horizontal flukes. Cetaceans are nearly hairless, and are insulated from the cooler water they inhabit by a thick layer of blubber. Some species are noted for their high intelligence.]



Hippocampi: (per the book) miniature/tiny horses that move on four legs and live under the sea.

[Per Wikipedia, Seahorses compose the fish genus Hippocampus within the family Syngnathidae, in orderSyngnathiformes. Syngnathidae also includes the pipefishes. "Hippocampus" comes from the Ancient Greek hippos meaning "horse" and kampos meaning “sea monster”.)

 

  ***Continued in Next Post**** 

Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

Kelpie: (per the book) an undefined waterborne faerie creature that can be ridden but has a tendency to shred/kill its riders.

[Per Wikipedia, Kelpie is a supernatural water horse from Celtic folklore that is believed to haunt the rivers and lochs of Scotland and Ireland; the name may be from Scottish Gaelic cailpeach or colpach "heifer, colt".}

[The horse's appearance is strong, powerful, and breathtaking. Its hide was supposed to be black (though in some stories it was white), and will appear to be a lost pony, but can be identified by its constantly dripping mane. Its skin is like that of a seal, smooth but is as cold as death when touched. Water horses are known to transform into beautiful women to lure men into their traps. It is understood that the nostril of the horse is what creates the illusion of grandeur. The water horse creates illusions to keep itself hidden, keeping only its eye above water to scout the surface, much like the illusion of a fish's pupil. It is wise to keep away from them.]

[The fable of the kelpie differs depending on the region where it is told. Other versions of the story describe the kelpie as "green as glass with a black mane and tail that curves over its back like a wheel" or that, even in human form, they are always dripping wet and/or have water weeds in their hair.]

[The water horse is a common form of the kelpie, said to lure humans, especially children, into the water to drown and eat them. It performs this act by encouraging children to ride on its back. Once its victims fall into its trap, the kelpie's skin becomes adhesive and it bears them into the river, dragging them to the bottom of the water and devouring them—except the heart or liver. A common Scottish tale is the story of nine children lured onto a kelpie's back, while a tenth keeps his distance. The kelpie chases him and tries to catch him, but he escapes. A variation on this is that the tenth child simply strokes the kelpie's nose but, when his finger becomes stuck to it, he takes a knife from his pocket and cuts his own finger off. He saves himself but is unable to help his friends as they are pulled underwater with the kelpie.]


Merrow: (per the book): a mermaid or merman with a human shaped upper body and tail of a fish.

[Per Wikipedia, Merrow (from Gaelic murúch) or Murrough (Galloway) is the Scottish and Irish Gaelic equivalent of the mermaid and mermen of other cultures. These beings are said to appear as human from the waist up but have the body of a fish from the waist down. They have a gentle, modest, affectionate and benevolent disposition.]

[The merrow were capable of attachment to human beings and there are reports of them inter-marrying and living among humans for many years. However, most times they eventually return to their former homes beneath the sea.]

[Merrow-maidens are reputed to lure young men to follow them beneath the waves where afterwards they live in an enchanted state. Merrows wear a special hat called a cohuleen druith which enables them to dive beneath the waves. If they lose this cap, it is said they have no power to return beneath the water.[1] Sometimes they are said to leave their outer skins behind, to assume others more magical and beautiful. The merrow has soft white webs between her fingers, she is often seen with a comb parting her long green hair on either side. Merrow music is often heard coming from beneath the waves.]


Naiad: (per the book/series) an undefined water/sea  faerie.

[Per Wikipedia, Naiads or Naiades (Ναϊάδες from the Greekνάειν, "to flow," and νμα, "running water") come from Greek Mythology and refer to  a type of nymph who presided over fountains, wells, springs, streams, and brooks.]

[They are distinct from river gods, who embodied rivers, and the very ancient spirits that inhabited the still waters of marshes, ponds and lagoon-lakes, such as pre-Mycenaean Lerna in the Argolid.]

[Naiads were associated with fresh water, as the Oceanids were with saltwater and the Nereids specifically with the Mediterranean, but because the Greeks thought of the world's waters as all one system, which percolated in from the sea in deep cavernous spaces within the earth, there was some overlap. Arethusa, the nymph of a spring, could make her way through subterranean flows from the Peloponnesus, to surface on the island of Sicily.]

Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

Nixie: (per the book) an undefined type of water/sea  faerie.   

[Per Wikipedia, Nix a/k/a Neck/Nixie (German: Nix/Nixe/Nyx) are shapeshiftingwater spirits who usually appear in human form. The spirit has appeared in the mythsand legends of all Germanic peoples in Europe.]

[Although in recent times such creatures have usually been depicted as human in shape (albeit in many cases shapeshifting), the English Knucker is generally depicted as a wyrm or dragon, thus attesting to the survival of the other usage as any 'water-being' rather than an exclusively humanoid creature.]

[Their sex, bynames, and various animal-like transformations vary geographically. The German Nix and his Scandinavian counterparts are males. The German Nixe or Nixie is a female river mermaid.]


Roane: (per the book) a type of virtually extinct sea fae with solid blue eyes descended from the Luidaeg who is the daughter of Oberon (faerie king) and Maeve (faerie queen). (The Luidaeg is also known as the Sea Witch.) The Roane in the book has the gift of prophesy. 


Selkies: (per the book/series) shapeshifters with some faerie magic that transition from humans to seals so long as they have some contact with their seal skin. When in human form, they retain webbed fingers, to the first knuckle, and webbed toes. In the absence of the seal skins, selkies are human and mortal with a purely human form.

[Per Wikipedia: Selkie (also known as silkies or selchies) are mythological creatures that are found in FaroeseIcelandicIrish[1], and Scottishfolklore.]

[They can shed their skin from seals to become humans. The legend apparently originated on the Orkney and Shetland Islands, where selch or selk(ie) is the Scotsword for seal from Old English seolh.]


Undine: (per the book/series) a type of faerie born of the tears of Maeve (Faerie Queen) shed when Oberon (Faerie King) left her for her sister Titianna. Undine are as old as the oldest seas. They are made of water and return to water when they die.

[Per Wikipedia: Undine, Undina or Ondine are sometimes interchangeable and may refer to: Ondine (mythology), a water nymph from mythology.] 

Distinguished Bibliophile
dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

I thought that a certain word from Hellbent is worth mentioning here.

 

Baculum (pl. bacula) (a/k/a penis bone, penile bone or os penis) is a bone found in the penis of most mammals. It is absent in humans, but present in other primates, such as the gorilla and chimpanzee. The bone aids in sexual intercourse. (See Wikipedia Baculum.) 

 

Author
Zkullis
Posts: 252
Registered: ‎07-21-2011
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Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style


dalnewt wrote:

I thought that a certain word from Hellbent is worth mentioning here.

 

Baculum (pl. bacula) (a/k/a penis bone, penile bone or os penis) is a bone found in the penis of most mammals. It is absent in humans, but present in other primates, such as the gorilla and chimpanzee. The bone aids in sexual intercourse. (See Wikipedia Baculum.) 

 


Dalnewt,

 

Years ago I had a co-worker that wore one of these around his neck.  This particular baculum was from a Raccoon.  I could only wonder why..........

Smite the Damned. http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Smite-The-Damned/Zack-Kullis/e/2940012784445 The sequel, Realm Crossing, to be released soon.
Moderator
paulgoatallen
Posts: 7,326
Registered: ‎08-16-2007

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style


Zkullis wrote:
Years ago I had a co-worker that wore one of these around his neck.  This particular baculum was from a Raccoon.  I could only wonder why..........

Wow. That's not creepy or anything.....   :smileyhappy:

"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky
Author
Zkullis
Posts: 252
Registered: ‎07-21-2011
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Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

LMAO

No doubt about that Paul!

 

I know that they have been used to create a kind of love charm (just who are they trying to attract), or sometimes for luck.

 

Raccoon

 

As for the guy I worked with, I'm pretty sure he wore it for the creep-factor!

 

Smite the Damned. http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Smite-The-Damned/Zack-Kullis/e/2940012784445 The sequel, Realm Crossing, to be released soon.
Wordsmith
3monstersmom
Posts: 871
Registered: ‎03-04-2009

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style


paulgoatallen wrote:

Zkullis wrote:
Years ago I had a co-worker that wore one of these around his neck.  This particular baculum was from a Raccoon.  I could only wonder why..........

Wow. That's not creepy or anything.....   :smileyhappy:


Wait... You're not suppose to wear them?  Damn!  Now I have to go change my cloths.  Wish someone would of told me before I spent all that time getting 2nd degree burns from the hot glue gun making that skirt and matching bra top. 

Author
Zkullis
Posts: 252
Registered: ‎07-21-2011

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

[ Edited ]


Wait... You're not suppose to wear them?  Damn!  Now I have to go change my cloths.  Wish someone would of told me before I spent all that time getting 2nd degree burns from the hot glue gun making that skirt and matching bra top. 


I think that outfit should make an appearance tonight at GP.  The weres and Nephilim would love it!   (mixing rooms, I know)

Smite the Damned. http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Smite-The-Damned/Zack-Kullis/e/2940012784445 The sequel, Realm Crossing, to be released soon.
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GameAmour
Posts: 38
Registered: ‎07-14-2011
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Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

This thread swings in amazing ways... :smileyvery-happy: ...but an interesting read.

 

 

 

 

 

Game Amour - Nook Apps developer and publisher

♥ NOOK Apps: Pigs Can Fly, Add-O-Matic, Vampires Vs Werewolves, Reversi Deluxe
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dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
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Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

[ Edited ]

This word is from 

Kindling the Moon. 

 

Caduceus:



(Used within book to describe a wand with a graphite core used to direct magical energy toward target.)

Per Wikipedia, Caduceus, (pronounced kəˈdjsəs or kəˈdjʃəs), originates from Greek κηρύκειον kērukeion meaning "herald's staff" and refers to the staff carried by Hermes in Greek mythology. The same staff was also borne by heralds in generalfor example by Iris, the messengerof Hera. It is a short staff entwined by two serpents, sometimes surmounted by wings. In Roman iconography it was often depicted being carried in the left hand of Mercury, the messenger of the gods, guide of the dead and protector of merchants, shepherds, gamblers, liars and thieves.

As a symbolic object it represents Hermes (or the Roman Mercury), and by extension trades, occupations or undertakings associated with the god. In later Antiquity the caduceus provided the basis for the astrological symbol representing the planet Mercury. Thus, through its use in astrology and alchemy, it has come to denote the elemental metal mercury.

By extension of its association with Mercury/Hermes, the caduceus is also a recognized symbol of commerce and negotiation, two realms in which balanced exchange and reciprocity are recognized as ideals. This association is ancient, and consistent from the Classical period to modern times. The caduceus is also used as a symbol representing printing, again by extension of the attributes of Mercury (in this case associated with writing and eloquence).

The caduceus is sometimes mistakenly used as a symbol of medicine and/or medical practice, especially in North America, because of widespread confusion with the traditional medical symbol, the rod of Asclepius, which has only a single snake and no wings.

Frequent Contributor
MichelleMuto
Posts: 72
Registered: ‎03-24-2011

Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

Beezlepup. A breed of supernatural dog prone to mischief and mayhem. I originally coined it for my dog, Ronan. I've never had a puppy/dog that found/created mischeif like him. Ever. 

 

Years ago, when he was just 12 weeks old, we took him to a local coffee shop that had an outside pation where dogs are allowed. It was Sunday, and as hubby, Ronan, and I sat at one of the tables, a group of church goers came in. We live in the heart of the bible belt. Another patron, a woman, spied Ronan and just had to come see the darling puppy. She'd never seen his breed before, and when she asked, I just blurted out. "He's a Beezlepup."

 

The woman turned to her husband, seated across the patio and yelled, "George! He's a Beezlepup. I think the neighbors have one, too!"

 

You should have seen the heads turn my way. 

 

Since then, Ronan became the inspiration for the character Devlin in The Book of Lost Souls. 

The Book of Lost Souls Being a teen witch has never been more fun. Or trouble.
Don’t Fear the Reaper Because I could not stop for Death, he kindly stopped for me...~Emily Dickinson 17-yr-old Keely Morrison finds that death isn't any easier than life.
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dalnewt
Posts: 2,725
Registered: ‎06-16-2009
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Re: A Word A Day – Paranormal Fantasy Style

[ Edited ]

(A supernatural utilized within J. F. Lewis' fourth Void City Novel, Burned.)

 

Nukekubi: 抜首 written in Chinese characters, meaning Detachable Neck-, also written in Japanese Hiragana characters as "ぬけくび" or Japanese Katakana characters as "ヌケクビ" (But still read as "Nukekubi") are monsters found in Japanese folklore. By day, nukekubi appear to be normal human beings. By night, however, their heads detach at the neck smoothly from their bodies and fly about independently in search of human prey. These heads attack by screaming (to increase their victims' fright), then closing in and biting.

 

While the head is detached, the body of a nukekubi becomes inanimate. In some legends, this serves as one of the creature's few weaknesses; if a nukekubi's head cannot locate and reattach to its body by sunrise, the creature dies. Legends often tell of would-be victims foiling the creatures by destroying or hiding their bodies while the heads are elsewhere.

 

By day, nukekubi often try to blend into human society. They sometimes live in groups, impersonating normal human families. The only way to tell a nukekubi from a normal human being is a line of red symbols around the base of the neck where the head detaches. Even this small detail is easily concealed beneath clothing or jewelry.

 

(See Wikipedia at Nukekubi.)