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LordRuthven
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Re: October Feature: Not Flesh Nor Feathers

Green Eyes is crunk.
Derek Tatum
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paulgoatallen
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Re: October Feature: Not Flesh Nor Feathers

Cheri:
Okay, I just finished Not Flesh Nor Feathers and here are my first few questions for you, if you choose to answer them (please do, I'm so curious!!!):

1. In a letter from Liz Gorinsky that accompanied the advanced reading copy of NFNF, she says that this is the final book in the Eden Moore trilogy. Is this set in stone? You have no plans of ever revisiting Eden?

2.I loved the character of the skateboarding Christ Adams. My favorite line in the entire book was "Christ went down to the water's edge, or this is how they tell it." How did this character – especially his name – come about?

3. Have you personally ever experienced anything otherworldly or ethereal?

4. I thought the KKK element added a real sense of history and place. When you were living in the South, did you actually get to see the vintage KKK murals that you talked about in the Author's Notes? And how unsettling was that experience?

5. What are you working on now? Are you going to continue on with the occult themes or are you heading somewhere different?

Thank you Cheri, I so loved this trilogy!
Paul
"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky
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cherie_priest
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Re: October Feature: Not Flesh Nor Feathers

Thanks, Paul! Now let's see...

[1. In a letter from Liz Gorinsky that accompanied the advanced reading copy of NFNF, she says that this is the final book in the Eden Moore trilogy. Is this set in stone? You have no plans of ever revisiting Eden?]

When I first started writing about Eden, she was almost an academic exercise. I wrote the first book, and didn't imagine it would go any farther from there -- but when Tor wanted a trilogy, I had to rethink my stance. It's not that I wasn't thrilled to have the chance to write more -- far from it; it was just that I was very unprepared. Now, in my perfect world filled with fat sacks of cash dollars American, I'd love to continue the stories ... but if I had my druthers (as they say), I'd like to make them a little more episodic. That's why the trilogy ends the way it does -- I wanted to make a definitive break from the first three, yet leave the possibility open for more adventures to follow.

The books have done respectably well -- but unfortunately they haven't been the sort of break-out success that would prompt my publisher to ask for more Eden stories, at least not yet. But if they're ever game to publish more, I'm more than willing to write more.


[2. I loved the character of the skateboarding Christ Adams. My favorite line in the entire book was "Christ went down to the water's edge, or this is how they tell it." How did this character – especially his name – come about?]

Haha! Christ is loosely based on a guy I knew in Chattanooga when I was a teenager. He's in his thirties now, and a proper more-or-less pseudo-civilized adult living in California (last I heard); but my caricature of him is sort of a "what if?" What if he never left, and if he never grew up? I used to joke about him and his best friend being my "lost boys," so I thought I'd try to imagine him as a "lost man."

As for the name, well, my old friend's name was Chris -- and I swear to God, for I have seen it myself -- his Social Security card had a typo on it :smileyhappy: Life is almost always so much weirder than fiction.

[3. Have you personally ever experienced anything otherworldly or ethereal?]

Yes, but most of it hasn't been terribly interesting. Derek [LordRuthven on this forum] would probably argue with me about that, because he knows my one really GOOD story, so I guess I'd better reference that real quick.

Without giving it too much length and detail -- me and Chris (yes, the guy I based Christ on) were poking around in the ruins of Pine Breeze with a couple of friends. I know you've read _Four and Twenty Blackbirds_, so here I must reference the chalkboard scene -- you know of which I speak?

Let's just say that something not altogether different actually happened to me and Chris -- except the whole of the blackboard message read, "You do not want to turn around now." So we didn't turn around; we shuffled out of the room and bolted out of that building. Shortly thereafter, the compound was completely torn down.

I was intensely grateful that Chris was standing beside me for that event. Otherwise, no one would have ever believed me.

[4. I thought the KKK element added a real sense of history and place. When you were living in the South, did you actually get to see the vintage KKK murals that you talked about in the Author's Notes? And how unsettling was that experience?]

I'm afraid I never got to see the murals in person, but I did see pictures of them, though -- and I regret to admit that I can't seem to find any on the internet. They were very amateurish and frankly silly-looking. If I remember correctly, they were discovered when the building was being remodeled. I think they were painted on plaster, and later wall-papered over.

I tracked down a brief news blurb about it here: http://www.wbir.com/news/archive.aspx?storyid=20398


[5. What are you working on now? Are you going to continue on with the occult themes or are you heading somewhere different?]

Well, last year I did a "mosaic novel" -- a collection of three related novellas -- for Subterranean Press. It's called _Dreadful Skin_ and it's a period piece that features a werewolf-hunting Irish nun. It's about to be re-released in trade paperback format (the original release was hardback), so perhaps it'll find its way across your desk at some point soon, if you're interested.

Next up from Tor is a gothic fantasy called _Fathom_, but that one has just now gone into serious, heavy-duty, hardcore editorial -- so it's a little hard to talk about at the moment. But early next year I'll have another release from Subterranean called _Those Who Went Remain There Still_ ... which was inspired by an old family story my grandmother passed along, years ago. It's set in rural Kentucky around 1899, and it boasts a collection of cave monsters, some feuding hillbillies, and the ghost of Daniel Boone.

My next unspoken-for-but-exciting-to-me-personally project will be a steampunk novel I've tentatively started calling _The Boneshaker_. I've long been a fan of Neo-Victorianism, and steampunk as an aesthetic has been ebbing and flowing for the better part of twenty years now ... so I'd like to see if I can't make a contribution to the cause, so to speak.

In short, yes -- I absolutely intend to continue with the paranormal or occult themes.

Thank you so much for all your support, dear sir -- and I'm so glad you approved of the trilogy! I'll still be poking around on this forum, so if you have any further questions -- or if anyone else does, either -- then fire away.
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extinah
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Re: October Feature: Not Flesh Nor Feathers

Ack! I had to scroll as fast as i could so i wouldn't see any spoilers (if any :])

Just to clarify, from the b&n description the book doesn't sound like it's from a series....so I can just buy the book and jump in and read it, right?

Can't wait!
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cherie_priest
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Re: October Feature: Not Flesh Nor Feathers

Don't worry! No real spoilers above :smileyhappy: And yes, they're sort of a series -- but people read them out of order all the time, and I'm told that it's not a problem. They're designed to stand more or less alone.
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LordRuthven
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Re: October Feature: Not Flesh Nor Feathers



cherie_priest wrote:
Derek [LordRuthven on this forum] would probably argue with me about that, because he knows my one really GOOD story, so I guess I'd better reference that real quick.




One of my favorite ghost stories by anyone, anywhere.

Can't wait for the Steampunk action.
Derek Tatum
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paulgoatallen
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Re: October Feature: Not Flesh Nor Feathers

Cherie:
I forgot to ask you about John Jude Palencar, the legendary artist behind all of the Eden Moore covers. How wonderful was it when you found out he was going to be doing the covers? And how much do you think the visual appeal of his Eden Moore "vision" has affected sales and overall feelings for the books? I for one was strongly moved by the cover art of your debut and that, in part, compelled me to pick up the book and investigate further...
Paul



http://www.johnjudepalencar.com/home.htm
"There never can be a man so lost as one who is lost in the vast and intricate corridors of his own lonely mind, where none may reach and none may save..." – Isaac Asimov, Pebble in the Sky
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cherie_priest
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Re: October Feature: Not Flesh Nor Feathers

Well, I'll tell you -- I did a little squee, right there in my office (which is where I learned this wonderful news). And the first time I saw the first cover? I nearly had a heart attack. I mean, the books really ARE absolutely beautiful -- and that's one thing that I don't mind bragging about, because I had nothing to do with it.

A lot of people don't seem to realize this, but authors very rarely have much say-so over what the cover will be; so when I found out I'd scored Palencar, I was intensely relieved. It was going to be okay! Hell, it was going to be FANTASTIC.

Only quite recently (within the last year or so) Palencar finally got himself a website -- and I finally got a chance to shoot him a squeally fangirl email thanking him for the wonderful covers. I can't begin to tell you how many people tell me they first picked up my books because of how pretty they were ... so I passed this info along with my heartfelt gratitude. I also told him that if ever we were to meet at a convention (or anywhere else), he drinks for free.

If I remember correctly, his reply specified that gin and tonic is his beverage of choice :smileyhappy:
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adoring_fan
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Re: October Feature: Not Flesh Nor Feathers

Cherie, just wanted to let you know how much I enjoyed all 3 Eden Moore books. I didn't know NFNF was the last in the trilogy, and I'm so glad you're open to more stories about her later.

Your personal ghost story literally gave me chills! Thanks for sharing. I'm looking forward to your new books and am going to try and track down a copy of Dreadful Skin. And what exactly is "steampunk"?

Krystn
I am only as strong as the cocktails I drink, the hairspray I use, and the girlfriends I have....
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adoring_fan
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Re: October Feature: Not Flesh Nor Feathers

Forgot...one more question. So you lived in Chattanooga when you were younger. Did you feel the desire to leave and never go back as some of your characters did? I was just curious as an escapee from a very, very small town. Krystn
I am only as strong as the cocktails I drink, the hairspray I use, and the girlfriends I have....
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cherie_priest
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Re: October Feature: Not Flesh Nor Feathers

Thank you, adoring_fan! (I bet you get a lot of author gushery over your handle, I do.)

And the long and short of it is that no, I never really wanted out -- but that may well be because I'm not really "from" Chattanooga, per se. I was born in Florida and I moved around quite a lot when I was younger, mostly around the Gulf coast. But I settled down in Chattanooga after going to the area for college; and I lived there for about twelve years -- right until about a year and a half ago.

My husband, on the other hand, was born and raised in a suburb of Chattanooga called "Hixson." He could not *wait* to get out of that place, bless his heart. That's one reason we're out here in the Pacific Northwest now; he took a job with Amazon.com.
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adoring_fan
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Re: October Feature: Not Flesh Nor Feathers

Cherie,
So, in all your travels through the *South,* any favorite cities? Do you prefer the Pacific NW or the South? And what are the settings for your upcoming novels?
Thanks, Krystn
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LordRuthven
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Re: October Feature: Not Flesh Nor Feathers



adoring_fan wrote:
And what exactly is "steampunk"?

Krystn




Generally it means contemporary science fiction/fantasy with a Victorian setting and/or values. The comic book "League of Extraordinary Gentlemen" is a fine example. The movie "League of Extraordinary Gentlemen" is a goofy example :smileywink:
Derek Tatum
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Chomp
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Re: October Feature: Not Flesh Nor Feathers



LordRuthven wrote:


adoring_fan wrote:
And what exactly is "steampunk"?

Krystn




Generally it means contemporary science fiction/fantasy with a Victorian setting and/or values. The comic book "League of Extraordinary Gentlemen" is a fine example. The movie "League of Extraordinary Gentlemen" is a goofy example :smileywink:





Heck, I liked that movie, Derek. :smileyhappy:

Carol
So many books, so little time...
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Chomp
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Re: October Feature: Not Flesh Nor Feathers

Cherie,

I finished Not Flesh Nor Feathers last night, and really enjoyed it. My intent was to get done much sooner, but many life events intervened to make that impossible. I have to go back and finish The first book and read the second. I also ordered and have received Dreadful Skin, which sounds like loads of fun.

After reading all of the posts on this thread, I am curious as to whether or not your own personal ghost experience inspired you to write in this genre, or were you always interested in doing so long before that incident?

Though a Yankee by birth (and hence, to most Southerners, always a Yankee), I have lived in northern Georgia for 22 years. I appreciate the feel of the South that you portray in your books. I marked the following passage:
"He was a Midwestern lad. He wouldn't understand. There were boundaries here, south of the Mason-Dixon; and there still are. Time moves slower here. History drags this place along, kicking and screaming, until a city like Chattanooga takes on polish enough to resemble its northern or western brethren. So when people come to it cold from somewhere else, they take a look around and they think, 'This is just like some other place I've seen.' But it isn't."

I think that quote expresses very clearly some of what is unique about the South. A friend of mine claims that there are some things (about the South) that one just doesn't understand unless one is a Southerner.

Did you find that the South was a particularly good fit as a setting for your supernatural stories? I am assuming you chose it for a reason. :smileyhappy: I found it intriguing that the people who witnessed the zombies didn't have much trouble believing what they were seeing. That was necessary for the story, but I can't help thinking that it was more realistic that these people believed their eyes since the story took place in the south rather than somewhere else.

I, also, am looking forward to the steampunk novel.

Thanks so much for taking part in this discussion. I am only sorry that I was unable to participate sooner. I will be watching out for your new releases.

Carol
So many books, so little time...
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LordRuthven
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Re: October Feature: Not Flesh Nor Feathers



Chomp wrote:


Heck, I liked that movie, Derek. :smileyhappy:

Carol




I know that many people did; heck even I own a DVD of it. If it is a steampunk movie done halfway fun, I'll enjoy it (for example, I love "Van Helsing" and my tolerance for the "Wild Wild West" movie is higher than most). It't just a shame that they couldn't have made a more cerebral, adult film. I know, I know, comics and film are two different mediums, yada, etc. But "LXG" didn't even keep the spirit of the comics. But my friends who never read the comic and have no frame of reference actually like the movie a lot.
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Chomp
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Re: October Feature: Not Flesh Nor Feathers



LordRuthven wrote:


Chomp wrote:


Heck, I liked that movie, Derek. :smileyhappy:

Carol




I know that many people did; heck even I own a DVD of it. If it is a steampunk movie done halfway fun, I'll enjoy it (for example, I love "Van Helsing" and my tolerance for the "Wild Wild West" movie is higher than most). It't just a shame that they couldn't have made a more cerebral, adult film. I know, I know, comics and film are two different mediums, yada, etc. But "LXG" didn't even keep the spirit of the comics. But my friends who never read the comic and have no frame of reference actually like the movie a lot.





Well, that's me, too. I have never read the comics, so had nothing to compare it to. have you seen that new vampire movie that just came out (the title escapes me right this moment)? If so, how is it?

Carol
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LordRuthven
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Re: October Feature: Not Flesh Nor Feathers

If you are thinking of "Perfect Creature," I have, and I can post my thoughts on it if you all are interested.

Short version: gorgeous setting, generic storyline. But well worth seeing.
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cherie_priest
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Re: October Feature: Not Flesh Nor Feathers

Oh gosh! I'm sorry Chomp, I didn't see your post. B&N is supposed to notify me when people post here, but perhaps the notice got snarfed up by my spam folder. Anyway, I'm sorry to take so long responding.

After reading all of the posts on this thread, I am curious as to whether or not your own personal ghost experience inspired you to write in this genre, or were you always interested in doing so long before that incident?

I didn't have any personal paranormal experiences until early adulthood, but I've always been interested in it. This is probably due to my upbringing; my mother is an intensely conservative evangelical Christian in a little-known denomination that's sometimes perceived as "cultish," and we weren't allowed to have much fiction around the house. However, for some reason authors who were dead were somehow more virtuous than the living ... so my dad would sneak books to me that my mother wouldn't object to. I started out on Poe, Blackwood, LeFanu, etcetera -- and got a good fill of ghost stories. I've always loved them, particularly the 19th century ones. I love me some crazy old Victorians.

Did you find that the South was a particularly good fit as a setting for your supernatural stories?

Well, I've mostly lived in the south. I moved around a lot, but for the most part, I stayed in the southeast. I lived in Texas for about 4 years, Kentucky for a couple, Chattanooga for 12, and Florida for most of the rest of it. You know what they say about writing what you know :smileyhappy:

Anyway, thank you so much for reading and responding, and again, I'm sorry it took me so long to get back to you.

~Cherie
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Chomp
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Re: October Feature: Not Flesh Nor Feathers

Thanks, Cherie, for your response. I am just sorry I was unable to participate sooner. I look forward to reading the other books, as well.

Carol
So many books, so little time...