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Amanda_R
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Registered: ‎09-25-2006
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The Book as a Whole: Jeanine and Her Father

[ Edited ]


Can you sympathize with Jeanette's devotion to her father? Did your perception of him change over the course of the novel?




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Note: This topic refers to the book as a whole.




Message Edited by Amanda_R on 06-06-2007 10:43 AM

jd
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jd
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Registered: ‎01-27-2007
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Re: The Book as a Whole: Jeanine and Her Father

You have to love your daddy even if he isn't a perfect human. The book discusses his relationship with his other children and they do not have the special relationship jeanine does. Because of jeanines relationship with her father she is able to do all the grown up things at an early age - drive and gamble and race the horse and of course fix the farm,etc. She was not raised as the delicate female. Although the other women in the story were not delicate but had more traditional roles. - jd
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bentley
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Re: The Book as a Whole: Jeanine and Her Father



Amanda_R wrote:


Can you sympathize with Jeanette's devotion to her father? Did your perception of him change over the course of the novel?





Reply to this message to discuss any of these topics. Or start your own new topic by clicking "New Message."


Note: This topic refers to the book as a whole.




Message Edited by Amanda_R on 06-06-2007 10:43 AM





You only have one biological father so of course I am sympathetic. She loved him but gradually as she got older knew the difference and knew what he was and wasn't. She had the ability to cut through the red tape with him. And he knew she saw him unmasked. I am not sure that my perception of Jack has changed that much. But I am only half way through the book and I was always saddened that he never saw his girls as the reason to change or how much they were worth to him. He should have been able to value them for being the unique individuals they each were. He also did not show his wife any respect and ridiculed her with his actions. So I am sympathetic to all of the female characters and can understand why all of them loved him; but I can also understand how they were disgusted with his actions.
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Fozzie
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Re: The Book as a Whole: Jeanine and Her Father

I can sympathize with Jeanine's devotion to her father. I think most children love their parents in spite of the faults the parents may have. I did cringe a bit when I read about Jeanine lying about his crime to people, saying he was put in jail for gambling. I don't blame her for not wanting to state the truth. I think I was cringing for how Jeanine felt inside each time she had to lie to cover up his behavior.

My opinion of Jack did not change throughout the book. I didn't feel I learned much more about him after he died.

As for forgiveness, it seems as though his family just let him lie after his death. No one spoke of him, good or bad, although according to Jeanine, they all missed him but no one would say so out loud. Therefore, I am content to just let his life speak for itself and don't feel the need to forgive him or hate him.
Laura

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flynn31
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Registered: ‎04-29-2007
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Re: The Book as a Whole: Jeanine and Her Father

Yes, I can sympathize with her love and devotion to her father.
I did soften towards him as the book went on.
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