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Rachel-K
Posts: 1,495
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Favorite passages

Please share your favorite passages!
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: Favorite passages (P. 340, but not a spoiler by itself)


rkubie wrote:
Please share your favorite passages!

I enjoyed the sly humor, such as:

"Dusk was dinner bell for millions of mosquitoes...." (p. 340)
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
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Re: Favorite passages (pp. 134-5, 194)

Also:

"Sometimes, I think if you took all the universities and all the hospitals out of greater Boston, you'd be able to fit what's left into about six city blocks." p. 134

Or

"Like the universities, the big hospitals in Boston merge into one another -- Mass General, Brigham and Women's, Dana Faber -- it's like a giant industrial park devoted to illness." p. 135

(I am impressed by Brooks ability to give us visual vignettes of city after city. That probably goes with having been an international journalist.)

"I don't have any trouble with the Sydney Harbour Tunnel, for instance It's bright down there, clean and shiny, confidence inspiring. But when you go into Boston tunnels, they're ... dim, and the tiles are leak stained, as if Boston Harbor is oozing its way through flaws in substandard concrete...."
p. 134

"Harvard Square could feel like a party on a warm night, full of energy and privilege and promise. Or it could seem like one of the bleakest places on earth -- an icy, windswept rat maze where kids wasted their youth clawing over one another in a fatuous contest for credentials."
p. 194
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
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Fozzie
Posts: 2,404
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Favorite passages (pp. 134-5, 194)



Peppermill wrote:
Also:

"Sometimes, I think if you took all the universities and all the hospitals out of greater Boston, you'd be able to fit what's left into about six city blocks." p. 134

Or

"Like the universities, the big hospitals in Boston merge into one another -- Mass General, Brigham and Women's, Dana Faber -- it's like a giant industrial park devoted to illness." p. 135

(I am impressed by Brooks ability to give us visual vignettes of city after city. That probably goes with having been an international journalist.)

"I don't have any trouble with the Sydney Harbour Tunnel, for instance It's bright down there, clean and shiny, confidence inspiring. But when you go into Boston tunnels, they're ... dim, and the tiles are leak stained, as if Boston Harbor is oozing its way through flaws in substandard concrete...."
p. 134

"Harvard Square could feel like a party on a warm night, full of energy and privilege and promise. Or it could seem like one of the bleakest places on earth -- an icy, windswept rat maze where kids wasted their youth clawing over one another in a fatuous contest for credentials."
p. 194

I liked these Boston descriptions too.  I read a couple of them to my husband and we chuckled.
Laura

Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.
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