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geneva
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎08-23-2007
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Re: Discuss Chapter 33



Rainydaysunshine wrote:
After I read this chapter I found that Snape is the most controversal and complex character out of the whole book! I really despised him at first, until I read the section about his love for Harry's mother. After reading his feelings toward Lily, I believe that Snape had every intention of taking Harry under his wing and becomming his mentor, until he saw how very very similar Harry looked and acted like his father, James. Snape let his broken heart and jealousy towards James reflect his relationship with Harry. I think he represents the constant battle between good and evil that takes within every persons soul. I like the fact that the good in Snape won out in the end.


I really love this chapter. It's so touching. I was impressed that the most complex character finally revealed his deep affection. Why was DD trusting Snape so much? This has been the question. This chapter satisfied me at last. After all that time, he always loved Lily! I cannot help loving him.

Snape almost failed to tell Harry all these stories. Voldemort ended up taking his life, nearly preventing Harry from knowing Snape's love and the most important message from DD.
Frequent Contributor
blinkgirl89
Posts: 645
Registered: ‎08-23-2007
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Re: Discuss Chapter 33

this chapter was so sad. i could not believe that lupin and tonks had died and right after having their baby. but the thing with snape and lily was really something. it really make you understand why snape is the way he is.
LAKERS 2009 CHAMPIONS!!!!!!!!!!!!

"PIGFARTS, IS ON MARS"
Frequent Contributor
hprocks2121
Posts: 249
Registered: ‎07-10-2007
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Re: Discuss Chapter 33

do you think lily knew that snape still liked her?


"Nerd pride, man."
Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it. --Ferris Beuller
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
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Re: Discuss Chapter 33

That's a good question, hprocks2121. I would guess that once she became involved with James she may not have paid much attention to him, or at least enough to realize his feelings. On the other hand, she may have had a small idea but nothing near the depth of feelings he apparently had for her. What do you think?

~ConnieK



hprocks2121 wrote:
do you think lily knew that snape still liked her?


"Nerd pride, man."


~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
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AliMcJ
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎07-22-2007
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Re: Discuss Chapter 33

This was the chapter which nearly caused me to throw the book aside in disgust. The book seemed in many places very thin, and the death of Tonks and Lupin was the thinnest: after all the time spent in building their characters, "oh, by the way, they died somewhere and here they are." Too many weak spots in the book just thrown in hurriedly to finish the series -- a bloodbath to kill off characters.

It was around here somewhere, perhaps earlier, where I said, "Either this book is weak on tying things together or the series was simply a narrative for children and I wasted a lot of time trying to figure out 'the genius of Ms. Rowling.'"

Sorry -- I'm glad everyone liked it. I was disappointed in not having things tied together better after having been tantalized with both promises and lies all along: to paraphrase a spectacular one: "I keep hearing that people like Snape. I hate him. I don't know why people like him -- it must be because of the hunky Alan Rickman playing his character. I write him as totally dislikable." I've always been one of the people who liked Snape from book 1, and figured he had a special connection to Harry and his parents from school. Now that all is said and done, that statement also says to me that the series was just for children -- a good series for children, indeed, not to take any enjoyment out of it for younger readers. I'm glad I read the series also; however, I do feel a bit hornswoggled by getting sucked into deeper meanings it might have had.


This lady does know how to sell books! -- and now Dumbledore is gay; she stays in the press as well as Jayne Mansfield in a spaghetti-strap dress.

That said,

I'm also glad I did get sucked in, just by virtue of the books being released as I read them, as that is an experience rare in reading, having so many people at one time reading the same book, and I am thankful to have participated in the phenomenon. Another reason I'm glad to have been sucked in is that it was enjoyable tying together threads from the books for speculation, encouraged by Ms. Rowling. The downside of that is that at the end of it all, it was disappointing; the upside of it is having met many people online who discussed elements of the books at a higher level of learning, on which Ms. Rowling does not disappoint, and deeper level of meaning -- on which she did disappoint, by comparison to discussion groups' topics.

A great narrative for readers up to college. Belongs in school curriculi across the country -- 6th grade in particular -- for its references to, reliance upon, sources in Latin, Greek, and Western Mythology.

- - -

Re: ". . .the best chapter in Harry Potter history. I'm going to try to present this in some sort of order, even though I'm just so -- I don't even know what I am right now.
First of all, I was sad Lupin and Tonks were dead. That was the first time I got teary-eyed in this book."
Contributor
AliMcJ
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎07-22-2007
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Re: Discuss Chapter 33

I think he did actually like Harry. His life had been tortuous and, like many abused children, his ability to express love for others was distorted.


"it was very touching to see Snape tearing Lily's signature out of her letter and sobbing . . . I wish that Snape had actually liked Harry, rather than just doing all of it for Lily. I think I would have been weeping if that had happened."
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