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Re: Discuss Chapter 36

I loved how Harry matured so much that he became a seventeen-year-old Albus Dumbledore, by addressing the Dark Lord as "Tom," and I love the fact that he learned that Snape was a good guy, and not really bad, though he seemed to be evil.

And here I admit I was wrong: For all of you that knew how much I thought Snape was evil and bad and all that, I was wrong, and when I learned the truth about him, I was touched.

This series was arguably the greatest series (and this book, the greatest book) of all freakin' time!!!
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Re: Discuss Chapter 36

[ Edited ]
I loved this chapter for a ton of obvious reasons. I loved it because we got to see that other side of Molly that Ginny takes after. I do admit that her taking over on Bellatrix was more of a shock on the literary front too though. There wasn't as much to back it up unlike some other scenarios...but that is an observation rather than a complaint. I still loved it.

I also loved how they saved Draco twice and possibly a third time. He could have chose to forget about the git, but he didn't. He did what he could to help Draco even by answering Narcissa (which he didn't have to do). This comes back to the whole choice thing again. It is certainly not what a Death Eater or Voldemort would have done.

Hagrid is such a big-hearted teddy bear, he was perfect in so many ways for carrying Harry out of the forest.

As for the sword, it is probably enchanted. That was awsome. I can't help but wonder if the hat was saved for future sortings.

I also love that not only did Harry use his signature move, it was on the up and up. He could have easily have done an unforgivable curese, but he chose not to. Another choice vs fate.

It was very fitting too that Harry called him Tom Riddle. Throughout the books it has been emphasized that we should call him by his name. By doing so, it makes us see that he is no different than the rest of us. Of course, I don't know how many people (characters that is) knew that Tom Riddle was Lord Voldemort. However, calling him Lord Voldemort may have accomplished this more so than "he-who-must-not-be-named", but it was Harry's one step further that truly brought him done to human level. He was a man named Tom Riddle. A daisy can call itself a mighty oak, that doesn't make it one. The same was true for Tom. This was a nice touch on Jo's part.

Finally, I forgot to mention that seeing Kreecher leading the elves was really cool. I always thought that the original fountain at the ministry was a scene from this last book. It waited till that last moment, but it happened, figuratively, and it was so cool.

Message Edited by Angsoden on 07-24-2007 04:27 PM
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Re: Discuss Chapter 36

[ Edited ]
I agree with the Molly vs Bellatrix statement. It still came as a shock literarily speaking, as well as literaly, but she was also hurt by Bellatrix. A mother finds it difficult not to be a mother to others. I'm sure that she tried to mother Sirius in her own ways. I'm sure she heard what was done to Hermione too before this scene. Although she wasn't close to Neville, she knew she was a stronger witch than the other kids were. She had revenge to seek too and she was being a mother to both the living and dead. I think any mother in her position would do the same.

This seems to be a really good theme that she ran with, because she does it with Narcissa too. Although, I would not be surprised if Draco was in danger from both sides in some respects. Narcissa needed to focus on her son more than others.

Message Edited by Angsoden on 07-24-2007 04:29 PM
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Re: Discuss Chapter 36

You have to think of how dumbledore is. He seems to study his adversaries carefully and find their weaknesses such as voldemorts weakness with power and underestimating love. So in a sense, dumbledore probably uses knowledge against grindenwald leading to his defeat.
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Re: Discuss Chapter 36

I am forced to admit that Snape was good but never has a writer given more reasons to hate a character than J.K. Rowling. I also liked how she tied it together in the end. She didn't make it seem like Snape loved Harry. He still was annoyed by Harry but u could tell the Love he had for Lily. I LOVE THIS BOOK!!!!!
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Re: Discuss Chapter 36



bentley wrote:


mastkudi25 wrote:
Neville was a true Gryffindor (probably spelt that wrong, sorry) at heart and so he got Godric G.'s sword from the hat. However, hadn't Voldemort (ooh, the Taboo-ed name!) set the hat on fire on Neville's head? How did it become whole again?

Also, I just want to have a "I was so right" song (in my head of course), but I can't help gloating a bit on these boards about my predictions for Snape and for Voldemort having a house elf (Kreacher, even though he only had poor Kreacher to test his dangerous experiments on him, for only that one night)! I feel so bad for Snape! Lily had called him "Sev"... and Severus Snape always loved her, since even before they got to Hogwarts. Love did win in the end, didn't it? It saved Snape from going on the wrong path for the rest of his life and Snape became one of the good guys because of the love in his heart for Harry's mother!

Anyhow, now that I have finished with my shameless gloating (heheh), I do have a question about the Elder wand. I don't really remember what chapter in the book talks about this, but I really would appreciate some feedback on this one -

The Elder Wand, the Deathly stick, etc etc, is supposed to be unbeatable. So then how did Dumbledore beat Grindelwald, and become the new master of the Elder wand?




Part of the answer is that Dumbledore never gave up being master of the wand since he planned his final demise with Snape so that Malfoy would not be the one to do it. So Dumbledore was still the master of the wand and not Snape as Voldemort assumed wrongly. I believe that then the transfer of power would be to whomever Dumbledore wanted it to go to or to someone who overcame Dumbledore and was able to kill him without him/his asking for it to be done. Snape did Dumbledore a favor. As you recall, Dumbledore was going to die anyways because of the ring and Snape at the very least gave him another year I believe and also was the one to put him out of his delirious misery when the time was right (as requested by Dumbledore himself).

Hope the above helps.

As far as the book itself, I loved it and though I was sad for the characters who did perish, I was delighted that the three main characters survived at the end. Great job Rawlings. I was also delighted to have Snape reconciled in my mind. I had always thought that he was a good guy but the first chapter of this book...made me stop and ponder. However, he was good to the end and was, I guess, the number one Dumbledore agent after the headmaster's demise. I also think that Rawlings wanted to convey messages of love, loyalty, friendship, family and goodness winning out despite great odds...to come across as the major themes of her epic and that love and goodness will overcome evil any day.

Loved the book.

Regards,

Bentley





Yes yes, i know that part, but i was asking about the Great Duel between Grindelwald and Dumbledore. Remember that it was only after defeating Grindelwald that Dumbledore came to be the new master of the Elder Wand... so my question is, if Grindelwald was fighting with all the might of the Elder Wand behind him, then how come he lost the battle and was captured and defeated by Dumbledore? How is it possible that Dumbledore defeated the master of the Elder wand (Grindelwald) in a heads-on duel?

Previously, it had usually been the case where the masters of the Elder Wand were killed in their sleep, or defeated when caught off guard. BUT in Dumbledore's great duel with Grindelwald, Grindelwald was actually fighting, and so the UNBEATABLE Elder wand should NEVER have been beat/defeated. How did that happen? Any insights you guys might have on this?
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Re: Discuss Chapter 36



dgslate wrote:
I have a few ideas on that...First, I tend to go along with the theory that "need and valor" and "only a true Griffendor could pull THAT out of the hat" enabled the sword to be in the hat when Neville needed it. Second, Goblin morality, according to Bill, says that if an object is goblin-made it is only really "rented" by the buyer. However, apparently the sword has a bit of its own mind and could CHOOSE to be wherever it wanted to be. That would also reinforce JKR's recurring theme of choice versus fate. Or third, since both the sword and the hat were relics of Godric Griffendor, maybe he enchanted them in some way and the goblins were over-ruled.





I agree! Though Griphook had taken the sword, I think that the sword might have been enchanted (actually, i think it says in the previous books that it IS enchanted) so that ONLY a true gryffindor could be its "master." It seems to me that when the 4 founders of Hogwarts enchanted the sorting hat, Gryffindor also put the sword in the hat's care - Harry got it out of the hat, and so did Neville, in their desperate need to survive. So the hat, I believe, is the true "guard" or protector or "keeper" of the sword and it spits it out to the true gryffindor in need of it, no matter where the sword is at the time.

Remember that when Harry got the sword with his fight with the Basilisk, isn't it the case that that was the first time in the books that the sword was mentioned, and then later Dumbledore said that "only a true Gryffindor could have pulled that out of the hat." It doesn't say anywhere that the sword was sitting happily in the Headmaster's office ANYTIME BEFORE it is mentioned and brought into the story while Harry so desperately fights the Basilisk.

I think that the hat has the power (or it is enchanted to have the means) to call for the sword no matter where it might be in the world (like with Griphook, in this case) and give it to a true gryffindor in need.
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Re: Discuss Chapter 36

Snape's death and learning of his sympathy, though it didn't seem like it, toward Harry and his love for Harry's mother, that led him to live his whole life alone and as a triple agent, made me feel bad for him. Lily didn't ever forgive him after he called her a "Mudblood" which he was very apologetic for (sorry for ending in a preposition).

Another thing that makes sense to me now, is that when Dumbledore, prior to his death said "Severus...Please...," he wasn't asking for Severus' help, he was asking him to fulfill his promise of killing him when the time came.

And for those of you who thought Harry calling Lord Voldemort by his real name, "Tom Riddle," was awesome...I totally agree. It brought out this Dumbledore-ish quality in Harry - he face death, so he no longer "feared" how it would feel; he was ready to die again if he had to, as long as he took down Voldemort. Professor Lupin wasn't kidding when, earlier in the book, he had said that "Expelliarmus" was Harry's signature move (I can't remember the page, but it was prior to Harry angering Lupin when says that "You are just trying to take the position of Sirius, and you can't be him").

I only thing I wish she had elaborated on was the Epilogue ("Nineteen Years Later"). I wish she had added more to the end, about what everyone was doing with their lives, rather than what a few handfuls of characters were doing. I really wanted to see how George held up after Fred died, what Percy was doing after he came back to the Weasley home, what the Professors are doing at Hogwarts (if some of them did not leave), etc.
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Re: Discuss Chapter 36



mastkudi25 wrote:
Yes yes, i know that part, but i was asking about the Great Duel between Grindelwald and Dumbledore. Remember that it was only after defeating Grindelwald that Dumbledore came to be the new master of the Elder Wand... so my question is, if Grindelwald was fighting with all the might of the Elder Wand behind him, then how come he lost the battle and was captured and defeated by Dumbledore? How is it possible that Dumbledore defeated the master of the Elder wand (Grindelwald) in a heads-on duel?

Previously, it had usually been the case where the masters of the Elder Wand were killed in their sleep, or defeated when caught off guard. BUT in Dumbledore's great duel with Grindelwald, Grindelwald was actually fighting, and so the UNBEATABLE Elder wand should NEVER have been beat/defeated. How did that happen? Any insights you guys might have on this?




I think there are two possibilities here:
(1) Grindelwald was not dueling with the Elder Wand -- maybe Dumbledore transfigured a look-alike before the fighting broke out.

(2) Grindelwald was using the Elder Wand but the "unbeatable" legend isn't perfectly true. It wasn't made by DEATH himself, it was made by a Brother. It might just be the most powerful wand in existence, and Dumbledore beat it through his incredible skills at Transfiguration -- he could have encased the man in the water bubble like he did with Voldemort. Or, Fawkes might have helped create a distraction.
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bentley
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Re: Discuss Chapter 36



mastkudi25 wrote:


bentley wrote:


mastkudi25 wrote:
Neville was a true Gryffindor (probably spelt that wrong, sorry) at heart and so he got Godric G.'s sword from the hat. However, hadn't Voldemort (ooh, the Taboo-ed name!) set the hat on fire on Neville's head? How did it become whole again?

Also, I just want to have a "I was so right" song (in my head of course), but I can't help gloating a bit on these boards about my predictions for Snape and for Voldemort having a house elf (Kreacher, even though he only had poor Kreacher to test his dangerous experiments on him, for only that one night)! I feel so bad for Snape! Lily had called him "Sev"... and Severus Snape always loved her, since even before they got to Hogwarts. Love did win in the end, didn't it? It saved Snape from going on the wrong path for the rest of his life and Snape became one of the good guys because of the love in his heart for Harry's mother!

Anyhow, now that I have finished with my shameless gloating (heheh), I do have a question about the Elder wand. I don't really remember what chapter in the book talks about this, but I really would appreciate some feedback on this one -

The Elder Wand, the Deathly stick, etc etc, is supposed to be unbeatable. So then how did Dumbledore beat Grindelwald, and become the new master of the Elder wand?




Part of the answer is that Dumbledore never gave up being master of the wand since he planned his final demise with Snape so that Malfoy would not be the one to do it. So Dumbledore was still the master of the wand and not Snape as Voldemort assumed wrongly. I believe that then the transfer of power would be to whomever Dumbledore wanted it to go to or to someone who overcame Dumbledore and was able to kill him without him/his asking for it to be done. Snape did Dumbledore a favor. As you recall, Dumbledore was going to die anyways because of the ring and Snape at the very least gave him another year I believe and also was the one to put him out of his delirious misery when the time was right (as requested by Dumbledore himself).

Hope the above helps.

As far as the book itself, I loved it and though I was sad for the characters who did perish, I was delighted that the three main characters survived at the end. Great job Rawlings. I was also delighted to have Snape reconciled in my mind. I had always thought that he was a good guy but the first chapter of this book...made me stop and ponder. However, he was good to the end and was, I guess, the number one Dumbledore agent after the headmaster's demise. I also think that Rawlings wanted to convey messages of love, loyalty, friendship, family and goodness winning out despite great odds...to come across as the major themes of her epic and that love and goodness will overcome evil any day.

Loved the book.

Regards,

Bentley





Yes yes, i know that part, but i was asking about the Great Duel between Grindelwald and Dumbledore. Remember that it was only after defeating Grindelwald that Dumbledore came to be the new master of the Elder Wand... so my question is, if Grindelwald was fighting with all the might of the Elder Wand behind him, then how come he lost the battle and was captured and defeated by Dumbledore? How is it possible that Dumbledore defeated the master of the Elder wand (Grindelwald) in a heads-on duel?

Previously, it had usually been the case where the masters of the Elder Wand were killed in their sleep, or defeated when caught off guard. BUT in Dumbledore's great duel with Grindelwald, Grindelwald was actually fighting, and so the UNBEATABLE Elder wand should NEVER have been beat/defeated. How did that happen? Any insights you guys might have on this?




You are still going on the supposition that the Elder Wand believed that Grindelwald was its master.

I never saw a true explanation why in this instance Dumbledore was able to overcome Grindelwald except in the case that the wand might not always be unbeatable and also in the fact that the wand did not see Grindelwald as being its likely master.

Maybe the fact that Grindelwald stole the wand from Gregorovitch without his permission and without a fair fight did not transfer ownership.

Dumbledore may have defeated Gregorovitch in another battle and because of this may have been the true master of the wand when fighting Grinderwald who had simply been a thief while Gregorovitch slept.

Maybe though considered unbeatable, a more powerful wizard with goodness in his heart can always overcome evil forces. Maybe the wand acts like the Griffindor Sword acted and it assesses where it wants to be and the worthiness of its owner. Remember, from the very beginning of the Harry Potter series it was well known that the wand always chooses its wizard.
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Re: Discuss Chapter 36

[ Edited ]
I think we have to presume that the wand believed that Grindelwald was its master, because if he wasn't, then Dumbledore wasn't the master, and so forth. Someplace back in time there would have been a Master to whom the wand still felt allegiance and who none of the subsequent owners defeated to make the wand theirs.

Most of the people who had the wand in the past had stolen the wand from the owner, and that was enough to be called "defeated", apparently, though I think they also killed the former owner after they got the wand, so I'm not really sure. Dumbledore did say that the prior owner did not have to be killed, though, just defeated.

So I think we are back to remembering that the "unbeatable" part is legend but not necessarily true when it is used in a duel with a wizard as powerful and clever as Dumbledore. He did say that he thought he was a bit better than Grindelwald... and he does seem to have an amazing array of transfiguration weapons plus he had Fawkes. That just might have been the difference.



Another thought I had was that the wand might just be unbeatable when it is a duel to the death. It is conceivable that Grindelwald did not duel to kill his friend Albus, and we know that Albus did not duel to kill Grindelwald. Both were raised as gentlemen and this might have been an all-out-stakes, winner take all duel, without the need to send out killing curses. Just a thought...

Message Edited by Psychee on 07-25-2007 02:01 PM
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bentley
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Re: Discuss Chapter 36



Psychee wrote:
I think we have to presume that the wand believed that Grindelwald was its master, because if he wasn't, then Dumbledore wasn't the master, and so forth. Someplace back in time there would have been a Master to whom the wand still felt allegiance and who none of the subsequent owners defeated to make the wand theirs.

Most of the people who had the wand in the past had stolen the wand from the owner, and that was enough to be called "defeated", apparently, though I think they also killed the former owner after they got the wand, so I'm not really sure. Dumbledore did say that the prior owner did not have to be killed, though, just defeated.

So I think we are back to remembering that the "unbeatable" part is legend but not necessarily true when it is used in a duel with a wizard as powerful and clever as Dumbledore. He did say that he thought he was a bit better than Grindelwald... and he does seem to have an amazing array of transfiguration weapons plus he had Fawkes. That just might have been the difference.



Another thought I had was that the wand might just be unbeatable when it is a duel to the death. It is conceivable that Grindelwald did not duel to kill his friend Albus, and we know that Albus did not duel to kill Grindelwald. Both were raised as gentlemen and this might have been an all-out-stakes, winner take all duel, without the need to send out killing curses. Just a thought...

Message Edited by Psychee on 07-25-2007 02:01 PM




No, I respectfully don't buy that. The Elder Wand was stolen from its rightful owner by Grinderwald; therefore Grindelwald was never its rightful owner (the owner never gave permission for this theft to occur). However, like I indicated before Dumbledore had fought the rightful owner and had won; therefore Dumbledore was the rightful owner of the wand and not his predecessor. Grindelwald was just a thief in the night. It never was said that someone needed to die to gain the wand's loyalty. What I am saying is that because Dumbledore fought the rightful owner and won before fighting Grindelwald (the thief); the Elder Wand was already his. And it is also true that the wand chooses its wizard.

However, this is one loose end that Rowling did not tie up. So it is an open question still.
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Re: Discuss Chapter 36

Bently, the whole history of that wand has the wand being taken by theft. The Peverell brother who owned it got drunk celebrating his victory over his enemy and the next guy stole the wand and slit his throat. He was then the new Master. Lovegood gives a bunch more historical references doing essentially the same thing.

Lovegood says that you must "capture" it from the wizard who owns it. Dumbledore says you have to "defeat" the wizard who owns it. Maybe the difference is that Dumbledore was too noble to ever consider stealing it unfairly, and the only means that would then be left to him would be to capture it in a gentlemanly duel.

But according to your theory, there was some kind of duel between Gregorovitch (who owned it) and Dumbledore, in which Dumbledore won. Now, when would that duel have occurred? If it occurred before Grindelwald took the wand, then Dumbledore would have earned the wand himself and would have taken it. If it occurred after Grindelwald took it, then I'd have to ask, do you really think that Dumbledore would challenge an innocent wandmaker to a duel, knowing full well what an advantage he would have over the poor guy? That doesn't sound like our noble Dumbledore. The man is a model of manners...

No, I think we have to go back to the idea that Dumbledore won the duel with Grindelwald. It might have occurred through superior magic. It also might, in some way, have occurred because Dumbledore did not want the wand for the power it possessed; he wanted it only to keep it out of the hands of someone who would use it to hurt people. Dumbledore said that he was ONLY fit to use the wand for protective purposes. Maybe there's a clue in there as to how he captured the wand. Right now, though, I don't see how a wand which has been happily owned by centuries of bloodthirsty wizards would start to have a conscience and choose a different kind to break the cycle, do you?
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Re: Discuss Chapter 36

I was dreading the entire book when Ron died from a ridiculous spoiler that I was slammed with two day s before the book came out! Everyone else in that spoiler that I heard died and I just knew Bellatrix was going to kill Ron. I'm glad the three survived.
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Re: Discuss Chapter 36

[ Edited ]

Psychee wrote:
Bently, the whole history of that wand has the wand being taken by theft. The Peverell brother who owned it got drunk celebrating his victory over his enemy and the next guy stole the wand and slit his throat. He was then the new Master. Lovegood gives a bunch more historical references doing essentially the same thing.

Lovegood says that you must "capture" it from the wizard who owns it. Dumbledore says you have to "defeat" the wizard who owns it. Maybe the difference is that Dumbledore was too noble to ever consider stealing it unfairly, and the only means that would then be left to him would be to capture it in a gentlemanly duel.

But according to your theory, there was some kind of duel between Gregorovitch (who owned it) and Dumbledore, in which Dumbledore won. Now, when would that duel have occurred? If it occurred before Grindelwald took the wand, then Dumbledore would have earned the wand himself and would have taken it. If it occurred after Grindelwald took it, then I'd have to ask, do you really think that Dumbledore would challenge an innocent wandmaker to a duel, knowing full well what an advantage he would have over the poor guy? That doesn't sound like our noble Dumbledore. The man is a model of manners...

No, I think we have to go back to the idea that Dumbledore won the duel with Grindelwald. It might have occurred through superior magic. It also might, in some way, have occurred because Dumbledore did not want the wand for the power it possessed; he wanted it only to keep it out of the hands of someone who would use it to hurt people. Dumbledore said that he was ONLY fit to use the wand for protective purposes. Maybe there's a clue in there as to how he captured the wand. Right now, though, I don't see how a wand which has been happily owned by centuries of bloodthirsty wizards would start to have a conscience and choose a different kind to break the cycle, do you?




I think there are some inconsistencies and Rowling tripped up herself in some instances....Snape was one of those inconsistencies and we can hypothetically take Rowling's explanation in this current book as being the reason why he was not the master of the wand..but then that in of itself raises other problems with her previous explanations.

Capture and Defeat are quite different terms. In another thread, you explained why Snape was not the master of the ElderWand even though he killed Dumbledore (and I agree). Dumbledore asked Snape to kill him at the appropriate time and Snape complied. Yet Snape did kill Dumbledore and Grinderwald stole the wand. Voldermort stole the wand as well while it lay in Dumbledore's grave but it did not feel right to him and he knew that he was not its master; therefore he thought by killing Snape who killed Dumbledore..that this would make all of the difference. I think you have stumbled on one of the inconsistencies not cleared up by Rowling; earlier in the thread I explored all of the possibilities. Do not have time to repeat them again...I think this is one of those open-ended questions.

Defeat can mean many different things..I do not think stealing a wand while someone sleeps who is alive or while someone eternally sleeps means that you have defeated that person. I think the wand knows who should be its master; just like the Griffindor Sword. Wands react differently to each wizard..even though the ElderWand was one of the three hallows and not the normal wizarding tool.

I appreciate your explanation but I believe this is one of those unanswered questions.

Additionally, somewhere I read that Dumbledore had in fact fought the person who Grinderwald stole the wand from and had in fact beaten him prior to the fight with Grinderwald. Possibly that is why he was the master of the wand that Grinderwald was using and maybe that is why he was able to overcome Grinderwald.

Rowling never summed this up well...so this remains open-ended for me..I just tried to explore some of the possibilities that have been discussed by others elsewhere.

Regards,

Bentley

Message Edited by bentley on 07-25-2007 05:54 PM
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Re: Discuss Chapter 36



Psychee wrote:
Bently, the whole history of that wand has the wand being taken by theft. The Peverell brother who owned it got drunk celebrating his victory over his enemy and the next guy stole the wand and slit his throat. He was then the new Master. Lovegood gives a bunch more historical references doing essentially the same thing.

Lovegood says that you must "capture" it from the wizard who owns it. Dumbledore says you have to "defeat" the wizard who owns it. Maybe the difference is that Dumbledore was too noble to ever consider stealing it unfairly, and the only means that would then be left to him would be to capture it in a gentlemanly duel.

But according to your theory, there was some kind of duel between Gregorovitch (who owned it) and Dumbledore, in which Dumbledore won. Now, when would that duel have occurred? If it occurred before Grindelwald took the wand, then Dumbledore would have earned the wand himself and would have taken it. If it occurred after Grindelwald took it, then I'd have to ask, do you really think that Dumbledore would challenge an innocent wandmaker to a duel, knowing full well what an advantage he would have over the poor guy? That doesn't sound like our noble Dumbledore. The man is a model of manners...

No, I think we have to go back to the idea that Dumbledore won the duel with Grindelwald. It might have occurred through superior magic. It also might, in some way, have occurred because Dumbledore did not want the wand for the power it possessed; he wanted it only to keep it out of the hands of someone who would use it to hurt people. Dumbledore said that he was ONLY fit to use the wand for protective purposes. Maybe there's a clue in there as to how he captured the wand. Right now, though, I don't see how a wand which has been happily owned by centuries of bloodthirsty wizards would start to have a conscience and choose a different kind to break the cycle, do you?




Psychee..one last thing..I also disagree that Dumbledore was always all manners..not when it came to duels or to challenges of any kind. From reading what I have read, I have come to a different conclusion concerning possible explanations. Dumbledore won the duel with Grindelwald (the question is how and why he won it) and did he have an advantage which maybe he at the time did not fully understand. Enough said..there is nothing new in Book seven which can clear this up concretely and my comments were meant to explore some other possibilities that were generated. Dumbledore as we found out was not perfect,,,but he did stand by Harry even when Harry doubted him.

Regards,

Bentley
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Svguy13
Posts: 52
Registered: ‎07-02-2007
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Re: Discuss Chapter 36

i know this is off topic don know wat chapter this is in but omg who guessd snape liked lily from such a small age wow that blew my mind away...just thinking about harry being snapes son give me goosebumps.harry snape ohh
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bentley
Posts: 2,509
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Re: Discuss Chapter 36



Svguy13 wrote:
i know this is off topic don know wat chapter this is in but omg who guessd snape liked lily from such a small age wow that blew my mind away...just thinking about harry being snapes son give me goosebumps.harry snape ohh




yes i have 2 agree. snape was looking for more of lily in harry and always found james who had picked on him...he only had lily's eyes..it is also possible that he felt that harry was the son he never had with the woman he loved. it was a great story and connection. snape was one of my favorite characters i have to admit...you always had to wonder what old snape was up to.
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Psychee
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Registered: ‎04-17-2007
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Re: Discuss Chapter 36

OK, Bently, you seem to have your mind made up, and I have no need to change your mind...

All I can say is that there is absolutely no reference in any of the seven books to a duel between Dumbledore and the wandmaker Gregorovitch. All we know about Gregorovitch is that he made Victor Krum's wand, that he was a well respected wand maker, and that Grindelwald stole the wand from him.

The only reference we have about duels that Dumbledore had in that part of the world were with Grindelwald. The Chocolate Frog cards say that he defeated him and Dumbledore says that he dueled him and won the wand from him.

The reason the wand did not work for Voldemort isn't because he stole the wand from Dumbledore's tomb. It's because by the time the wand was IN the tomb, Draco had become its master. Later, Harry had defeated Draco, getting Draco's wand, transferring the Master role of the Elder wand to Harry as well.

But enough said... I have submitted the question to JKR for her chat on July 30. You might wish to submit the question yourself!

Go here:

http://livechat.bloomsbury.com/index.php

Good talking to you!
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TBCSI1
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Registered: ‎07-26-2007
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Re: Discuss Chapter 36

It was nice seeing Mrs. Weasley fight to protect her chidlren and for her son's death. Poor Fred. And poor George losing a twin. Also how in the end the Malfoy's ended the way they did. Not fighting to kill anyone but to find their son safe. Also Dreco's mother checking Harry to see if he is dead and yet asks him how her son is and not giving him up when he answered. And then Harry explained everything to Ron aand Hermione after they won the war. How he gave up that powerful wand cause he just wanted his own. Throughout this book I don't know how many times my heart beat faster, and crying and laughing as if I was there with them.
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