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Distinguished Scribe
blkeyesuzi
Posts: 730
Registered: ‎01-26-2008

Re: Introduce yourself!


Joseph_F wrote:
That is always the problem with discussing a broad religious category (Christianity, Islam, Judaism). Different sects might have almost nothing to do with each other except for some link in distant history. And that's not even getting into all the varieties within Hinduism. Let's move this discussion over to the "What would you like to talk about?" topic though.

Perhaps part of the beauty of this board is our ability to talk about all of them and not focus on just one in particular. Personally, much of my interest has been in learning about all the religions. My library contains fairly equal amounts of information from each of the major religions. I've read the Bible, the Koran, Buddhism (The dhammapada, etc), and so much more.  I really enjoy the diversity and learning from everything to which I'm exposed. 

 

I tend to keep my personal choice in religion to myself...I tend to discuss everything on more of an acedemic level. Does that make sense at all?  I'm not sure if I'm being very eloquent in this respect.

Suzi

"I still find each day too short for all the thoughts I want to think, all the walks I want to take, all the books I want to read, and all the friends I want to see. " --John Burroughs
Distinguished Scribe
blkeyesuzi
Posts: 730
Registered: ‎01-26-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce yourself!


Peppermill wrote:

Joseph -- I wish you as moderator and those who choose to participate on this board the best.

 

Since I am currently a member of a group that reads spiritual/religious books for about nine months out of each year and meets to discuss them bi-monthly, I am not certain time will permit me to participate here.  But, I think it is a wonderful opportunity that the participants can (and hopefully will) make very enriching.

 

I will try to throw out some possibililties another time, but for now let me say that, among many other interests, I continue to try to increase my understanding of Sunni versus Shia (Shiite) Muslims.

 

Your suggestion, Joseph, of the books of Samuel is very interesting for a  cross-section of history and religion and spirituality they could offer.

 

Pepper 

 

Oops!  I see while I have been diddling with this post, Nadine has introduced the issue of understanding the differences and similarities of the major sects of Islam!

Message Edited by Peppermill on 03-25-2009 12:14 AM

Peppermill,

 

I'd love to see your reading lists.  As someone who devotes 9 months of the year to spiritual works, I would imagine you have some great reading to suggest. I'd be very interested in learning what you've been reading, as I'm always looking for suggestions in spiritual reading.

Suzi

"I still find each day too short for all the thoughts I want to think, all the walks I want to take, all the books I want to read, and all the friends I want to see. " --John Burroughs
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce yourself!


blkeyesuzi wrote:

Peppermill,

 

I'd love to see your reading lists.  As someone who devotes 9 months of the year to spiritual works, I would imagine you have some great reading to suggest. I'd be very interested in learning what you've been reading, as I'm always looking for suggestions in spiritual reading.


Thank you, Suzi.

 

Let me not mislead by what I mean by  "I am currently a member of a group that reads spiritual/religious books for about nine months out of each year and meets to discuss them bi-monthly."  That doesn't mean we devote all our time to such reading, only that we go through about three to five books per year and then take a break for the summer, i.e., we typically spend about four to six evenings discussing a book that we have divided into sections of perhaps 100 pages.  We have a delightful time -- it is a delightful group.  We have been meeting for several years and our want-to-read list is much longer than our able-to-read choices.

 

I do, however, have some thoughts about what I would like to share with this board -- and, now, specifically, you.  But give me a week or so to collect some things about me.  I may post sooner, but there are a couple that I know I want to include for which I do not have copies or remember the author (unusual name) and I shall have to track them down.  At the moment, I am surrounded by Bibles (~7), a Quran, and Karen Armstrong books that I have pulled from the shelves or otherwise gathered from their usual locations.

 

In the meantime, I will mention one that is a cross between self-help and spiritual that is on my profile list of favorite books:  How to Live in the World and Still Be Happy by Hugh Prather. (A few of the spiritual and religious books I have read or am reading are in my profile library, but they are mostly only recent reads.)

 

I also look forward to hearing about your favorites and suggestions.

 

Pepper

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Distinguished Scribe
blkeyesuzi
Posts: 730
Registered: ‎01-26-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce yourself!


Peppermill wrote:

blkeyesuzi wrote:

Peppermill,

 

I'd love to see your reading lists.  As someone who devotes 9 months of the year to spiritual works, I would imagine you have some great reading to suggest. I'd be very interested in learning what you've been reading, as I'm always looking for suggestions in spiritual reading.


 

<Snip>

 

In the meantime, I will mention one that is a cross between self-help and spiritual that is on my profile list of favorite books:  How to Live in the World and Still Be Happy by Hugh Prather. (A few of the spiritual and religious books I have read or am reading are in my profile library, but they are mostly only recent reads.)

 

I also look forward to hearing about your favorites and suggestions.

 

Pepper


 

Thanks, Pepper!  I look forward to hearing more from you.  I'll do the same. I think I'm going to enjoy this board!

Suzi

"I still find each day too short for all the thoughts I want to think, all the walks I want to take, all the books I want to read, and all the friends I want to see. " --John Burroughs
Scribe
vivico1
Posts: 3,456
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Introduce yourself!

Hi there,

I am Vivian from Oklahoma. I see some familiar names in here. Considering some of our head to head convos in simple fiction and non fiction book clubs, I am a bit leary about this particular club. Also, you do have another LDS here, me lol. Yes I am Mormon too. I saw C.S. Lewis mentioned a couple of times in hear and aside from books written by members of our church, you often here quotes from his work in talks at some of our church gatherings. 

 

I was in a fiction club in here last year called Cage of Stars, I believe, written by a non Mormon about a young Mormon girl coming to grips with the savage murder of her little sisters and the murderer getting out within a few years because of a mental disorder. The story was about her faith, her family, her fears and could she forgive him or not. She moves to where he is when he gets out and it becomes quite suspenseful in what she will do. I thought it was very well done for a nonmember. A really good fiction book about a horrible tragedy and the family just happens to be Mormons is all. It was nice to see us in some main stream suspense.

 

I would like to make one suggestion as this club goes on if I may. If you discuss something with someone in here of a particular religion and want to know something, you might ask them what they believe, what their doctrine is, if thats what you are interested in, and not tell them what they believe from what you have read elsewhere. I find this very common in discussing religious things, people want to tell others what they believe instead of listening to what they know they believe, cause they are in it. For example, I have some Baptist friends being in the bible belt lol, and I would rather know from them what their belief is about something and if its their personal belief or if its their religion's official doctrine, than read about it second hand or from an ex Baptist. And worse is reading what someone outside their religion says, and then telling them, this is what you believe! I have had this happen to me too. People tell me what "the Mormons" believe when I tell them I am one! I know what I believe and I know what the doctrine of my church is, and its always very strange to hear someone tell me what I believe lol. So, just saying, I guess, be mindful and respectful of each other's beliefs and not try to "teach" them what they believe. With a good diverse group in here, talking about a religion's doctrine, or talking about what you think about a book, any good book,  given your own set of beliefs, could be a really good learning experience on how we all view the world, and the world of literature, if we are respectful of each other. :smileywink:

Vivian
~Those who do not read are no better off than those who can not.~ Chinese proverb
New User
matt12j
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎03-28-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce yourself!

Hi, my name Matt

 

This is my first post on this blog, and I hope it's OK to mention my new book (moderator please let me know if this isn't OK!) - because it addresses the whole issue of religion in what I consider a new way..

 

In it I look at religion, and Christianity specifically, in terms of realizing personal happiness through understanding what humans are trying to achieve in pursuing religious beliefs. I thought it was an interesting angle which is why I wrote the book - and I'd love to hear other people's opinions on what I've concluded.

 

The title is 'Life Happiness - The Secret of Life Language' .

 

cheers

 

M

B&N Bookseller
Brad_W
Posts: 179
Registered: ‎10-25-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce yourself!

I'm Brad.  I've been Catholic all of my life.  I love learning about all different religions.  There is a lot that can be learned from so many amazing perspectives and experiences.
With purpose and on purpose
New User
BarryBrown
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎03-28-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce yourself!

I live in the East Coast. I was raised Methodist, but now I see things from a different prospective. My life has had many twists and turns (like most of us I'm sure) and it caused me to question the established rules and rituals laid down by organized religions. Mankind continues to strive in his quest to understand the world he lives in and religion offers a peek into that existence, but only a peek. Like kindergarten, organized religions are the start of our spiritual learning process. Eventually, we will all begin to seek greater truths as we grow spiritually.  

 

  

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce yourself!

vivico1 wrote (excerpt)

 

I would like to make one suggestion as this club goes on if I may. If you discuss something with someone in here of a particular religion and want to know something, you might ask them what they believe, what their doctrine is, if thats what you are interested in, and not tell them what they believe from what you have read elsewhere. I find this very common in discussing religious things, people want to tell others what they believe instead of listening to what they know they believe, cause they are in it. For example, I have some Baptist friends being in the bible belt lol, and I would rather know from them what their belief is about something and if its their personal belief or if its their religion's official doctrine, than read about it second hand or from an ex Baptist. And worse is reading what someone outside their religion says, and then telling them, this is what you believe! I have had this happen to me too. People tell me what "the Mormons" believe when I tell them I am one! I know what I believe and I know what the doctrine of my church is, and its always very strange to hear someone tell me what I believe lol. So, just saying, I guess, be mindful and respectful of each other's beliefs and not try to "teach" them what they believe. With a good diverse group in here, talking about a religion's doctrine, or talking about what you think about a book, any good book,  given your own set of beliefs, could be a really good learning experience on how we all view the world, and the world of literature, if we are respectful of each other. :smileywink:



Wonderful post, Vivian!  Thank you!
"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Frequent Contributor
Redcatlady
Posts: 260
Registered: ‎10-30-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce yourself!

I'm a veteran of the old BNU, where I was Melissa.  Now I'm Redcatlady.  In the '90's, when I was going through a hard time emotionally due to internalized family conflict (it's a long story), I read just about every spiritual self-help book there was -- Thomas Moore, Sarah Ban Brachnech (I hope I spelled the name right), etc.  Now, I'm more into Debbie Macomber, Jan Karon, and Maeve Binchy at the moment.  But a really good study -- say, Karen Armstrong (did anybody here see her on NOW With Bill Moyers recently?), Rumi, etc. -- would whet my appetite.

 

Redcatlady

Distinguished Correspondent
Joseph_F
Posts: 271
Registered: ‎03-05-2009

Re: Introduce yourself!


vivico1 wrote:
I would like to make one suggestion as this club goes on if I may. If you discuss something with someone in here of a particular religion and want to know something, you might ask them what they believe, what their doctrine is, if thats what you are interested in, and not tell them what they believe from what you have read elsewhere. I find this very common in discussing religious things, people want to tell others what they believe instead of listening to what they know they believe, cause they are in it. For example, I have some Baptist friends being in the bible belt lol, and I would rather know from them what their belief is about something and if its their personal belief or if its their religion's official doctrine, than read about it second hand or from an ex Baptist. And worse is reading what someone outside their religion says, and then telling them, this is what you believe! I have had this happen to me too. People tell me what "the Mormons" believe when I tell them I am one! I know what I believe and I know what the doctrine of my church is, and its always very strange to hear someone tell me what I believe lol. So, just saying, I guess, be mindful and respectful of each other's beliefs and not try to "teach" them what they believe. With a good diverse group in here, talking about a religion's doctrine, or talking about what you think about a book, any good book,  given your own set of beliefs, could be a really good learning experience on how we all view the world, and the world of literature, if we are respectful of each other. :smileywink:

Welcome Vivian (and everyone else introducing themselves in here). I absolutely expect everyone to be respectful of everyone else's beliefs. We have to be mindful that when we talk about a person's religion, we're often speaking to their core values and sense of their place in the world, and so it's not helpful to completely disregard their point of view.

 

On the other hand, we also have to remember that religious views are going to vary, not only from sect to sect, but from person to person. An Orthodox Jew and I are not going to agree at all on what a religious Jew believes and does. But another Reform Jew and I are not likely to be able to completely agree on that either! 

 

So if someone tells you that your religion or sect believes something that you don't believe, you might start a conversation on where they heard those beliefs. It might well be that some groups within your religion really do believe that, and you can learn a little about variations within your own tradition as well. 

Contributor
drumrebrown
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎03-29-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce yourself!

My name is Elvin aka drumrebrown.  I am from Oklahoma.  I am 29 years old and I have been in Baptist, Seventh Day Adventist and Wiccan religions.  I am a newfound Non-denominational, Spiritual, Christian.  I know it sounds funny but we all have our own ways of getting to the right spot don't we.  I am VERY open minded about religions and would like to learn about different ones so that I can help to put some puzzle peices together in my head.  I look forward to sharing thoughts and reviews with yall
New User
la_rose
Posts: 4
Registered: ‎03-30-2009
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce yourself!

Hi everyone.  I am quite new to this site but very excited to see this subject matter open for discussion.  I find religion fascinating, particularly how people are affected by it.  I consider myself a Christian, a follower of Jesus Christ.  His word, His example, His love.  I read and study the Bible at church and also on my own to better understand all that God has to offer.  I always find myself wanting more knowledge.  I look forward to these discussions!
Inspired Scribe
IBIS
Posts: 1,735
Registered: ‎11-22-2006
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce yourself!

Hi, I'm IBIS and live in Boston. 

 

I was born in Cambodia, and was a devout Khmer Buddhist until Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge destroyed my childhood. I escaped with the help of total strangers, and immigrated to the US.

 

In the US, I happened upon C.S Lewis' writings, Thomas Merton's "The Seven Story Mountain", St. Augustine's "The City of God". These stories of conversion affected me deeply.

 

And  "Lives of the Saints"...  the simple stories of Christian martyrs who sacrificed their lives for their faith profoundly moved me.

 

At 20, I converted to Roman Catholicism. 

 

I'm fascinated by other people's spiritual journeys.

IBIS

"I am a part of everything that I have read."
Inspired Bibliophile
Vermontcozy
Posts: 5,279
Registered: ‎10-20-2008

Re: Introduce yourself!

Hi,I'm Victoria(Hi,Ryan) from Vermont.I was raised in the Jewish Faith,which is my core belief.I am also an explorer.I have found comfort with the teachings of Thich Nhat HanhThe Miracle of Mindfulness  ,a Vietnamese Monk.I listen to him almost daily..you can search for his teachings here on BN,to see if you are interested.Its very simple,and it works for me.Also Marianne Williamson..'Return to Love"Return to Love   and "Illuminata'Illuminata  . It enhances my life and her prayer book(Illuminata) is a comfort as well..she doesn't push  Christian beliefs,so it works for me.I am non-judgemental and respect all..I have become interested in the past few years in Islam....Because of the traditions,family etc nothing radical..I have a website for anyone interested in Thich Nhat Hanh,with him speaking to a very enlightened group..I will post if anyone is interested....I also loved " Red Tent " by Anita DiamentRed Tent  ..VTC
Kindness,I've discovered,is everything in life...Issac Bashevis Singer
Contributor
fon_addict58
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎06-25-2008
0 Kudos

Re: Introduce yourself!

Hi everyone, I'm new to this board but am intrigued by all the suggestions for reading.  I have read The Shack as well as both of the Anne Rice books.  They were all excellent and thought provoking.  I am interested in compiling a reading guide for The Shack.  If anyone knows of a good source, please pass on the information.  Out of Egypt and Road to Cana, although technically fiction, have their historical base in some of the more obscure gospels (Timothy) and offer great insight to this time period in Jewish history.  , Anne Rice's spiritual autobiography, is also a good testament to the struggles individuals face with identification with a particular religion.  Also an excellent read.

Mary

 

Christ the Lord Christ the Lord Called Out of Darkness  The Shack     

 

Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006

Re: Introduce yourself!

blkeyesuzi wrote in part:    I tend to keep my personal choice in religion to myself...I tend to discuss everything on more of an acedemic level. Does that make sense at all?  I'm not sure if I'm being very eloquent in this respect.

 

This comment helps clarify for me something which I am finding unfortunate, at least from my perspective, about certain of the posts on this board so far.

 

I'm sure I'll put this badly, but here goes.

 

There is a difference between non-belief and disbelief.  I think the one is entirely appropriate here.  I find the other, personally, less so.

 

Let me take an analogy which, like all analogies, will be imperfect, but may be helpful to some.  Let's say we were scheduling a discussion about parent-child bonding.  Now not all parents will have a special bond with their own children that they don't have with other children, but I believe many parents will and do.  I have certainly experienced such a bond, and for me, it is something quite real.  

 

Now, a non-parent may be able to discuss this bond intellectually or academically, but they will never be able to discuss it in its full reality because it is something more than mere intellect or academia.  It is an experience that cannot be fully understood without undergoing the experience, just as, for example, no matter how many books I read about Shackleton's boat journey to South Georgia after the sinking of the Endurance I can never fully understand what it must have felt like to have been aboard the James Caird. 

 

Back to our parenthood discussion, non-parents can respond to such a discussion in two (or more) ways.  They can say something like "I have never experienced personally that relationship, but I can respect that for those who have it is something real and special and I can respect and appreciate that even as I don't share it."  Or, they can say something like "I have never experienced personally that relationship, and I don't believe there is anything special at all about the parent-child bond.  I think those who claim to feel something real and true there are just fooling themselves, that there is nothing real there.    I will discuss the issue academically and intellectually, but from the specific viewpoint that those who believe there is anything real there are in fact creating a pretend reality out of a delusion." 

 

I realize that I am presenting only two ends of a spectrum, and that there is a great deal of middle ground,  but I think the end points do exist and are meaningful.

 

I think I could participate creatively in a discussion about the issue of parent-child bonding with the first group; I'm not sure I could with the second. 

 

When this board was formed, I hoped that those who did not themselves have a direct personal experience of the reality of the divine would bring to the discussion the general approach of the first group I have described above.  Without referring to any specific individuals, I am getting a sense, though, that there may be some here who will be entering the discussion with the general approach of the second group. 

 

If think if this second approach becomes prevalent, it will significantly diminish, if not eliminate, the possibility of a serious spiritual discussion here.  Which I think would be a shame.

 

As I have said, I'm sure I have put this badly, for which I ask forgiveness.  And perhaps this stikes a chord with nobody but myself.  But it has been a developing thought and concern in me as I have read through the range of posts here.

 

 

_______________
I think, therefore I drive people nuts.
Distinguished Wordsmith
Dreamer4ever
Posts: 411
Registered: ‎11-06-2008

Re: Introduce yourself!


Everyman wrote:

blkeyesuzi wrote in part:    I tend to keep my personal choice in religion to myself...I tend to discuss everything on more of an acedemic level. Does that make sense at all?  I'm not sure if I'm being very eloquent in this respect.

 

This comment helps clarify for me something which I am finding unfortunate, at least from my perspective, about certain of the posts on this board so far.

 

I'm sure I'll put this badly, but here goes.

 

There is a difference between non-belief and disbelief.  I think the one is entirely appropriate here.  I find the other, personally, less so.

 

Let me take an analogy which, like all analogies, will be imperfect, but may be helpful to some.  Let's say we were scheduling a discussion about parent-child bonding.  Now not all parents will have a special bond with their own children that they don't have with other children, but I believe many parents will and do.  I have certainly experienced such a bond, and for me, it is something quite real.  

 

Now, a non-parent may be able to discuss this bond intellectually or academically, but they will never be able to discuss it in its full reality because it is something more than mere intellect or academia.  It is an experience that cannot be fully understood without undergoing the experience, just as, for example, no matter how many books I read about Shackleton's boat journey to South Georgia after the sinking of the Endurance I can never fully understand what it must have felt like to have been aboard the James Caird. 

 

Back to our parenthood discussion, non-parents can respond to such a discussion in two (or more) ways.  They can say something like "I have never experienced personally that relationship, but I can respect that for those who have it is something real and special and I can respect and appreciate that even as I don't share it."  Or, they can say something like "I have never experienced personally that relationship, and I don't believe there is anything special at all about the parent-child bond.  I think those who claim to feel something real and true there are just fooling themselves, that there is nothing real there.    I will discuss the issue academically and intellectually, but from the specific viewpoint that those who believe there is anything real there are in fact creating a pretend reality out of a delusion." 

 

I realize that I am presenting only two ends of a spectrum, and that there is a great deal of middle ground,  but I think the end points do exist and are meaningful.

 

I think I could participate creatively in a discussion about the issue of parent-child bonding with the first group; I'm not sure I could with the second. 

 

When this board was formed, I hoped that those who did not themselves have a direct personal experience of the reality of the divine would bring to the discussion the general approach of the first group I have described above.  Without referring to any specific individuals, I am getting a sense, though, that there may be some here who will be entering the discussion with the general approach of the second group. 

 

If think if this second approach becomes prevalent, it will significantly diminish, if not eliminate, the possibility of a serious spiritual discussion here.  Which I think would be a shame.

 

As I have said, I'm sure I have put this badly, for which I ask forgiveness.  And perhaps this stikes a chord with nobody but myself.  But it has been a developing thought and concern in me as I have read through the range of posts here.

 

 


 

I think I see what you're saying, Everyman. I may have it slightly off, but I think I'm understanding your point.

 

I agree with what you said about the two groups. And I think I question, in the way of religion, how well everyone will be able to identify with each other. Likely, there will be a number of people falling in the second group, but I don't know how often you'll hear from them.

 

I think I made less sense than you.

 

 

The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them. --Mark Twain
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007

Re: Introduce yourself!

Eman -- Take a look at the way Joseph_F has been handling the diversity of views so far on this board and I think you will find some excellent modelling for the rest of us.  We do not have to accept each others' views to allow each other the full expression of them. 

 

It is true that it may sometimes feel confining and irritating and even anger provoking, but in a world with Sam Harris, Richard Dawkins, Christopher Hitchens and many others of their persuasions about God and religion, I believe that it behooves all of us to find ways to communicate with each other across those gaps.  Maybe once again I am naive, but I am reminded deeply of Nhat Hanh's descriptions of the practice of mindfulness, which includes the ability, when we are angered, to breathe three times and be aware and (perhaps) to choose to live and act into peace.

 

Pepper

 


Everyman wrote:

blkeyesuzi wrote in part:    I tend to keep my personal choice in religion to myself...I tend to discuss everything on more of an acedemic level. Does that make sense at all?  I'm not sure if I'm being very eloquent in this respect.

 

This comment helps clarify for me something which I am finding unfortunate, at least from my perspective, about certain of the posts on this board so far.

 

I'm sure I'll put this badly, but here goes.

 

There is a difference between non-belief and disbelief.  I think the one is entirely appropriate here.  I find the other, personally, less so.

 

Let me take an analogy which, like all analogies, will be imperfect, but may be helpful to some.  Let's say we were scheduling a discussion about parent-child bonding.  Now not all parents will have a special bond with their own children that they don't have with other children, but I believe many parents will and do.  I have certainly experienced such a bond, and for me, it is something quite real.  

 

Now, a non-parent may be able to discuss this bond intellectually or academically, but they will never be able to discuss it in its full reality because it is something more than mere intellect or academia.  It is an experience that cannot be fully understood without undergoing the experience, just as, for example, no matter how many books I read about Shackleton's boat journey to South Georgia after the sinking of the Endurance I can never fully understand what it must have felt like to have been aboard the James Caird. 

 

Back to our parenthood discussion, non-parents can respond to such a discussion in two (or more) ways.  They can say something like "I have never experienced personally that relationship, but I can respect that for those who have it is something real and special and I can respect and appreciate that even as I don't share it."  Or, they can say something like "I have never experienced personally that relationship, and I don't believe there is anything special at all about the parent-child bond.  I think those who claim to feel something real and true there are just fooling themselves, that there is nothing real there.    I will discuss the issue academically and intellectually, but from the specific viewpoint that those who believe there is anything real there are in fact creating a pretend reality out of a delusion." 

 

I realize that I am presenting only two ends of a spectrum, and that there is a great deal of middle ground,  but I think the end points do exist and are meaningful.

 

I think I could participate creatively in a discussion about the issue of parent-child bonding with the first group; I'm not sure I could with the second. 

 

When this board was formed, I hoped that those who did not themselves have a direct personal experience of the reality of the divine would bring to the discussion the general approach of the first group I have described above.  Without referring to any specific individuals, I am getting a sense, though, that there may be some here who will be entering the discussion with the general approach of the second group. 

 

If think if this second approach becomes prevalent, it will significantly diminish, if not eliminate, the possibility of a serious spiritual discussion here.  Which I think would be a shame.

 

As I have said, I'm sure I have put this badly, for which I ask forgiveness.  And perhaps this stikes a chord with nobody but myself.  But it has been a developing thought and concern in me as I have read through the range of posts here.



"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Distinguished Wordsmith
Everyman
Posts: 9,216
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
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Re: Introduce yourself!

Dreamer4ever wrote in part:  I think I made less sense than you.

 

I'm sorry to have to disagree with you, but I must. I think you made perfect sense.  

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I think, therefore I drive people nuts.