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Inspired Contributor
Choisya
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Re: Pagans in Scotland

Ancient Pagan ceremonies still take place in Scotland, especially on New Year's Eve, Hogmanhay.  Here is a video of the Stonehaven Fireball ceremony.

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Joseph_F
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Re: Pagans, Druids, Shamans, and Witches

[ Edited ]

What's interesting to me is how these tend to get lumped together (Pagans, Druids, Shamans, and Witches) even though in their original forms they are very different. In fact, "pagan" and "shaman" aren't really names of religions in the strictest sense, but instead are names of types of religious practice.

 

When I hear someone say they are "pagan", to me it is as specific as someone announcing they are a monotheist. 'Yes,' is my response, 'but what kind?' And shaman is just a description of a religious function, as general a term as "clergyman".  There are shamans in the Amazon, shamans in the Arctic Circle, and shamans in Tibet, all who practice very different religions.

 

It's just interesting that these many diverse practices tend to get grouped together, which I guess makes sense as a group of minority religions in contrast to the major world religions. (Of course, in many ways Hinduism is pagan, and there are way, way more practitioners of traditional Chinese ancestor worship than Jews in the world).

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TiggerBear
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Re: Pagans, Druids, Shamans, and Witches

 


Joseph_F wrote:

What's interesting to me is how these tend to get lumped together (Pagans, Druids, Shamans, and Witches) even though in their original forms they are very different. In fact, "pagan" and "shaman" aren't really names of religions in the strictest sense, but instead are names of types of religious practice.

 

When I hear someone say they are "pagan", to me it is as specific as someone announcing they are a monotheist. 'Yes,' is my response, 'but what kind?' And shaman is just a description of a religious function, as general a term as "clergyman".  There are shamans in the Amazon, shamans in the Arctic Circle, and shamans in Tibet, all who practice very different religions.

 

It's just interesting that these many diverse practices tend to get grouped together, which I guess makes sense as a group of minority religions in contrast to the major world religions. (Of course, in many ways Hinduism is pagan, and there are way, way more practitioners of traditional Chinese ancestor worship than Jews in the world).


(nod) It's more of a desire to lump the Gaul/Celt/Greco Roman and the next door neihbors together.
The use of the terminology of titles is simply a result of an extension of explaining the practices. A Druid could easily be worshiping the same god as a shaman (often is), just ceremonial differences. It a flag to any outsider, oh this circle does it this way.
Besides it would have been awkward to title it Pagans including pagans, druids, witches, shamans, solitaries, and others. Too wordy.:smileywink:
If you ever seen a Shinto ceremony the similarities are what stand out, and they use priest and priestess. Understanding that most religious practices share a basic similarity will take you a long way.
And yes if you really want to know when someone says they're pagan, you should ask them what kind. It might just spark a good conversation.


 

 

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Choisya
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Re: Pagans, Druids, Shamans, and Witches

[ Edited ]

 

Understanding that most religious practices share a basic similarity will take you a long way.
Yes, and this includes the main monotheistic religions which ante-date many of the others. We particularly see this at Xmastime and Easter - the festivals of the Winter Solstice and of Fertility. Succoth, Hannukah and Ramadan also have a similarity to the harvest festivals which were celebrated in the autumn. The majority of ancient festivals are based around the seasons as the weather and the growing of food have always been so important to mankind. 
I had always understood a Shaman to be a storyteller/healer/mediator and they too are part of most religions, if not all.  A Christian priest is in the same tradition.   I don't think Shamanism is a religion per se.


TiggerBear wrote:

 


Joseph_F wrote:

What's interesting to me is how these tend to get lumped together (Pagans, Druids, Shamans, and Witches) even though in their original forms they are very different. In fact, "pagan" and "shaman" aren't really names of religions in the strictest sense, but instead are names of types of religious practice.

 

When I hear someone say they are "pagan", to me it is as specific as someone announcing they are a monotheist. 'Yes,' is my response, 'but what kind?' And shaman is just a description of a religious function, as general a term as "clergyman".  There are shamans in the Amazon, shamans in the Arctic Circle, and shamans in Tibet, all who practice very different religions.

 

It's just interesting that these many diverse practices tend to get grouped together, which I guess makes sense as a group of minority religions in contrast to the major world religions. (Of course, in many ways Hinduism is pagan, and there are way, way more practitioners of traditional Chinese ancestor worship than Jews in the world).


(nod) It's more of a desire to lump the Gaul/Celt/Greco Roman and the next door neihbors together.
The use of the terminology of titles is simply a result of an extension of explaining the practices. A Druid could easily be worshiping the same god as a shaman (often is), just ceremonial differences. It a flag to any outsider, oh this circle does it this way.
Besides it would have been awkward to title it Pagans including pagans, druids, witches, shamans, solitaries, and others. Too wordy.:smileywink:
If you ever seen a Shinto ceremony the similarities are what stand out, and they use priest and priestess. Understanding that most religious practices share a basic similarity will take you a long way.
And yes if you really want to know when someone says they're pagan, you should ask them what kind. It might just spark a good conversation.


 

 


 

 

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TiggerBear
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Re: Pagans, Druids, Shamans, and Witches

 


Choisya wrote:

 


I had always understood a Shaman to be a storyteller/healer/mediator and they too are part of most religions, if not all.  A Christian priest is in the same tradition.   I don't think Shamanism is a religion per se.

(shaking head) No mearly a manner of practicing one. So is Druidism and witchcraft.

 

 

Inspired Contributor
Choisya
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Re: Pagans, Druids, Shamans, and Witches

Druids as shamans/wise men are quite ancient but Druidism is of more recent origin.  There is a lot of controversy about it in Wales.  

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TiggerBear
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Re: Pagans, Druids, Shamans, and Witches

 


Choisya wrote:

Druids as shamans/wise men are quite ancient but Druidism is of more recent origin.  There is a lot of controversy about it in Wales.  


 

 

That's interesting.

 

Different issues over on this side of the pond. Some circles have designated it as a boys only club.

 

 

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TiggerBear
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Re: Pagans, Druids, Shamans, and Witches

*bump*

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Flowering
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Re: Pagans, Druids, Shamans, and Witches

Hi TiggerBear! I was just wondering what is the goal of these religions and practices?

 

Also, are these religions based on nature? All of these religions were practiced by people a long time ago, where there wasnt technology, so they relied mostly on nature for things, and to explain the unknown.

 

It is also my belief that all religions sort of came from the same thing, so naturally, one question would be, how are the teachings the same as other core religions? I read about "do not  onto others what you wouldnt do to yourself" one. That one was quite obvious. But do they focus on love as well, and truth, or morals really?

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TiggerBear
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Re: Pagans, Druids, Shamans, and Witches

[ Edited ]

 

Flowering wrote:

Hi TiggerBear! I was just wondering what is the goal of these religions and practices?

 

Also, are these religions based on nature? All of these religions were practiced by people a long time ago, where there wasnt technology, so they relied mostly on nature for things, and to explain the unknown.

 

It is also my belief that all religions sort of came from the same thing, so naturally, one question would be, how are the teachings the same as other core religions? I read about "do not  onto others what you wouldnt do to yourself" one. That one was quite obvious. But do they focus on love as well, and truth, or morals really?

 

 

Goal? Odd question that. Hmm goal... personal spiritually enlightening methods... Do other religions have goals other than personal ones?

 

Is paganism closer to nature, yes. For the rest of your questions, absolutely not. No more than Judeo/Christ/Muslim was based on nature since they were pretechnology. Since those are based around the Mesopotamian thunder god.

 

Could you more define your first statement, what do you mean by "the same thing"? And then I'll get into the love, morals, truth bits.