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101 Shakespeare

This is an area for free thinking for those who like me are starting from scratch.

Investigating the background:

Midsummer Night Dream- That night in the end of June (summer solstice) was a magic night, when pagan maidens collected flowers and herbs, put them under their pillows and whom they dreamt about they would marry. It was also a celebration of sexuality and fertility.

Later curbed in some nations by Christianity into St John's day.

So for illustration SHKSP maybe chose that magic night as an extreme when anything can happen, no reason (of the day) is hampering the instincs (of the night) and the dream takes us...whoknowswhere.

In England they had bonfires, in Sweden the bonfires are held in the end of April (burning the old, preparing the soil for the new seeds). Somewhere that is don on MArdi Gras, carrying out the winter.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midsummer

Why is the play called Midsummer Night's Dream?

ziki
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Re: 101 Shakespeare



ziki wrote:
Midsummer Night was a magic night, when pagan maidens collected flowers and herbs, put them under their pillows and whom they dreamt about they would marry.
ziki

Which explains perfectly why S uses a flower to anoint the eyes of the sleepers to make them wake up to find the love of their dreams. Fits in beautifully with the legend.
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Choisya
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Re: 101 Shakespeare

Why is the play called Midsummer Night's Dream?

Because it was a night upon which Elizabethans expected magical things to happen, as you have posted below. Therefore the audience was predisposed towards the happenings in the play:smileysurprised:.

Bonfires in the UK are associated with Autumn, the burning of the fields after harvest etc. Samhain in Celtic culture, which means 'summers end', and Halloween are associated with bonfires. Scandinavian countries celebrate Walpurgis night (April 30th) with bonfires. Mardi Gras stems from the Roman Lupercalia which was a circus type festival with much dressing up and merriment, and which honoured the pastoral god Lupercus on February 15. When the Christians came to Rome it became the pre-Lenten period of feasting, ending with Shrove Tuesday and a fast. Many Carnivals are still held around Shrove Tuesday - Caribbean, Rio, Venice etc.




ziki wrote:
This is an area for free thinking for those who
like me are starting from scratch.

Investigating the background:

Midsummer Night Dream- That night in the end of June (summer solstice) was a magic night, when pagan maidens collected flowers and herbs, put them under their pillows and whom they dreamt about they would marry. It was also a celebration of sexuality and fertility.

Later curbed in some nations by Christianity into St John's day.

So for illustration SHKSP maybe chose that magic night as an extreme when anything can happen, no reason (of the day) is hampering the instincs (of the night) and the dream takes us...whoknowswhere.

In England they had bonfires, in Sweden the bonfires are held in the end of April (burning the old, preparing the soil for the new seeds). Somewhere that is don on MArdi Gras, carrying out the winter.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midsummer

Why is the play called Midsummer Night's Dream?

ziki


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Re: 101 Shakespeare



Everyman wrote:


ziki wrote:
Midsummer Night was a magic night, when pagan maidens collected flowers and herbs, put them under their pillows and whom they dreamt about they would marry.
ziki

Which explains perfectly why S uses a flower to anoint the eyes of the sleepers to make them wake up to find the love of their dreams. Fits in beautifully with the legend.




Excellent! Most excellent excellent.
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Re: 101 Shakespeare

I place my questions here:

How come that all actors have got first names except Snug?

ziki
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Re: 101 Shakespeare

What is the relationship between Egeus and Theseus? Why is Theseus taking over for Egeus when he speaks to Hermia? (right at the beginning of the play...act I, scene I, ca56-92)

ziki
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Re: 101 Shakespeare

1)Why is SHKS using both aye and ever?
2) What is 'overfull of self-affairs'? Busy? (Act I, sc.1)

ziki
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Re: 101 Shakespeare

House remote seven leagues...how far is that?

What sayest thou?

ziki
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Re: 101 Shakespeare

Theseus is the Duke and Egeus is coming to him as the local "authority figure" to plead his case as regards his "wayward daughter."




ziki wrote:
What is the relationship between Egeus and Theseus? Why is Theseus taking over for Egeus when he speaks to Hermia? (right at the beginning of the play...act I, scene I, ca56-92)

ziki


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Re: 101 Shakespeare

Yes, mentally busy. The next line is "My mind did lose it." Theseus is saying that he had so much on his mind that he had forgotten to talk to Demetrius about all the stuff he (Theseus) was hearing.




ziki wrote:
2) What is 'overfull of self-affairs'? Busy? (Act I, sc.1)

ziki


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Re: 101 Shakespeare



stratford wrote:
Theseus is the Duke and Egeus is coming to him as the local "authority figure" to plead his case as regards his "wayward daughter."





ouch, double fathers...
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Re: 101 Shakespeare

An obsolete unit of distance of variable length (usually 3 miles): WordReference.com

A unit of distance equal to 3.0 statute miles (4.8 kilometers): Answers.com & The Free Dictionary

So, according to these 3 sources, about 21 miles.



ziki wrote:
House remote seven leagues...how far is that?

What sayest thou?

ziki


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Re: 101 Shakespeare

Sorry, Ziki. I was completely remiss in not noting that you are definitely in a LEAGUE of your own.




ziki wrote:
House remote seven leagues...how far is that?

What sayest thou?

ziki


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Re: 101 Shakespeare

Trenchant observation, and something that I had never been aware of until you just pointed it out, despite reading the play more than once and seeing it many times. I have no definitive idea and after checking numerous sources I am none the wiser, except that 2 or 3 sources pointed out the fact that Snug did not have a first name. But they did not bother to go any further than that. Several thoughts. Possibly he did have a first name in the original manuscript/s that has been lost in the mists of time. Or, since he only speaks a total of 4 times in the entire play and is probably more memorable for playing a Lion than a person, maybe it was thought a first name was not necessary as it would humanize him more when, as I just mentioned, he is more memorable for his animal peformance. Maybe it was such an awful or ridiculous name that over time it got dropped. Finally, Snug himself says, "Have you the lion's part written? Pray you, if it be, give it me, for I am slow to study." Obviously he is not the brightest bulb on the tree and maybe he was considered too stupid to have a first name or perhaps he was just too dumb to remember it. I know, I am really stretching here, but as I said I have no definitive idea, just some random thoughts to share with you.



ziki wrote:
I place my questions here:

How come that all actors have got first names except Snug?

ziki


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Laurel
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Re: 101 Shakespeare



stratford wrote:
Trenchant observation, and something that I had never been aware of until you just pointed it out, despite reading the play more than once and seeing it many times. I have no definitive idea and after checking numerous sources I am none the wiser, except that 2 or 3 sources pointed out the fact that Snug did not have a first name. But they did not bother to go any further than that. Several thoughts. Possibly he did have a first name in the original manuscript/s that has been lost in the mists of time. Or, since he only speaks a total of 4 times in the entire play and is probably more memorable for playing a Lion than a person, maybe it was thought a first name was not necessary as it would humanize him more when, as I just mentioned, he is more memorable for his animal peformance. Maybe it was such an awful or ridiculous name that over time it got dropped. Finally, Snug himself says, "Have you the lion's part written? Pray you, if it be, give it me, for I am slow to study." Obviously he is not the brightest bulb on the tree and maybe he was considered too stupid to have a first name or perhaps he was just too dumb to remember it. I know, I am really stretching here, but as I said I have no definitive idea, just some random thoughts to share with you.



ziki wrote:
I place my questions here:

How come that all actors have got first names except Snug?

ziki







What first name would you give to a snug?
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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name for Snug

[ Edited ]

Laurel wrote:What first name would you give to a snug?




Michael Snug.

(It has to go with the others: Peter, Nick, Francis, Tom, Robin)



ziki

Message Edited by ziki on 02-23-200712:18 PM

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mistake

[ Edited ]

Message Edited by ziki on 02-23-200706:06 PM

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Re: 101 Shakespeare

[ Edited ]

Laurel wrote:








ziki wrote:
I place my questions here:

How come that all actors have got first names except Snug?



ziki







What first name would you give to a snug?




I would call him Samuel or Stephen, for alliterative and biblical reasons.
Or, Sherwood ("bright forest") or Silvester/Sylvester ("from the forest"), for alliterative reasons and internal meanings relevant to the play.

Message Edited by stratford on 02-23-200711:00 AM

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why the Bard?

[ Edited ]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bard

I must admit that featured painting by John Martin is pretty wild, I like it :-) I'd like to see the original.

There is a park in western Ct (near Washington, Ct) that minus the castle is very much like this valley (in the total impression). Can't say exactly where, I wasn't driving. :-D

ziki
http://www.livgenmi.com/1895/CT/connecticut1895.jpg

Message Edited by ziki on 02-23-200706:23 PM

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old measurement

[ Edited ]

stratford wrote:
An obsolete unit of distance of variable length (usually 3 miles)




Thanks. I thought pehaps it was something poetic and I didn't google. Once I did after I've read your answer I found this for those who get high on measurements:

old measurements

Message Edited by ziki on 02-23-200706:33 PM

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