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purse and Moby



samantilles wrote:After a while, I simply stopped changing purses, and went shopping with my leatherbound Moby Dick (My largest hardbound book) and made sure that whatever purse I bought could fit the book...




I am sure that people on the Moby Dick board would like this approach to life :-)
ziki
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LibbyLane
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Purses

I'm with you! If it can't hold a book or two, it's not worth carrying! I get picked on in my family for my big ugly purse, but I'm never bored, and never without a book. :-)
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BookWorm21
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Re: A Note about Editions and Quoting Shakespeare



samantilles wrote:
Portability is rather relative... Lets just say every time I start a new book, my purse size changes! After a while, I simply stopped changing purses, and went shopping with my leatherbound Moby Dick (My largest hardbound book) and made sure that whatever purse I bought could fit the book, my iPod, and my wallet... such things like cell phones, car keys, make-up, and business cards aren't nearly as important!
I did however, purchase a paperback copy of MSND for "portability" reasons. My excuse for double purchasing (as I do own a wonderful hardbound complete Shakespeare) Donate it to a good cause... libraries, book exchanges, etc. If only I could write it off my taxes!




I love that you shop with a book so you can find a purse that fits it. That sounds like something I would do! I take at least one book everywhere I go, even if I know I won't have time to read it, I just like knowing it's there, and I could. I also got a paperback copy of MSND. The Folger is a nice size, very portable, but I'm still on the lookout for a complete works...
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donyskiw
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Re: A Note about Editions and Quoting Shakespeare

I'm like you guys. I never go anywhere without a book. Usually I take two: one nice book and one that I can read while eating that I wouldn't be upset if I got some food on the pages.

Denise
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Laurel
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Re: A Note about Editions and Quoting Shakespeare

[ Edited ]

donyskiw wrote:
I'm like you guys. I never go anywhere without a book. Usually I take two: one nice book and one that I can read while eating that I wouldn't be upset if I got some food on the pages.

Denise




I've just started collecting small books so I can always have one in the pocket of one of my crutches. I already had all the wonderful little Yale Shakespeare volumes, and now I'm collecting the four inch by six inch Oxford World's Classics that were printed in the 1930s or so. I have four volumes of Trollope's Barchester novels so far, but I've had to send to England for some of them.

And now I have a new toy--an MP3 player loaded with thousands of "pages" of classic literature as well as language lessons, history lectures, and operas. Last Wednesday was a beautiful, sprig-like day here in the rainy Pacific Northwest. I took a bus to the "big town" and "read" The Brothers Karamazov on the way to the pool where I exercise. We took the scenic route back home just before dusk. As I listened to the poetry of Milton, Gray, and Blake, I rejoiced in the slant of the sun across Mount Baker and the rugged Canadian mountains, the gleam of the almost-full moon over the mountain, and the sheer beauty of a hundred or so trumpeter swans fresh from Siberia resting in the flooded fields and discussing family plans.

Life is good! :smileyhappy:

Message Edited by Laurel on 02-07-200709:20 AM

Message Edited by Laurel on 02-07-200709:22 AM

"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Choisya
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Re: A Note about Editions and Quoting Shakespeare

I hope to make an Ipod my next acquisition for the same reason Laurel:smileyhappy: I have a limited MP3 memory on my mobile phone, which I use for music but by the time I go on my next holiday, I hope to have books loaded onto an Ipod (it's on my birthday list). Do you upload them from disc or from the internet? Have you any good websites to share?




Laurel wrote:

donyskiw wrote:
I'm like you guys. I never go anywhere without a book. Usually I take two: one nice book and one that I can read while eating that I wouldn't be upset if I got some food on the pages.

Denise




I've just started collecting small books so I can always have one in the pocket of one of my crutches. I already had all the wonderful little Yale Shakespeare volumes, and now I'm collecting the four inch by six inch Oxford World's Classics that were printed in the 1930s or so. I have four volumes of Trollope's Barchester novels so far, but I've had to send to England for some of them.

And now I have a new toy--an MP3 player loaded with thousands of "pages" of classic literature as well as language lessons, history lectures, and operas. Last Wednesday was a beautiful, sprig-like day here in the rainy Pacific Northwest. I took a bus to the "big town" and "read" The Brothers Karamazov on the way to the pool where I exercise. We took the scenic route back home just before dusk. As I listened to the poetry of Milton, Gray, and Blake, I rejoiced in the slant of the sun across Mount Baker and the rugged Canadian mountains, the gleam of the almost-full moon over the mountain, and the sheer beauty of a hundred or so trumpeter swans fresh from Siberia resting in the flooded fields and discussing family plans.

Life is good! :smileyhappy:

Message Edited by Laurel on 02-07-200709:20 AM

Message Edited by Laurel on 02-07-200709:22 AM




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Laurel
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Re: A Note about Editions and Quoting Shakespeare



Choisya wrote:
I hope to make an Ipod my next acquisition for the same reason Laurel:smileyhappy: I have a limited MP3 memory on my mobile phone, which I use for music but by the time I go on my next holiday, I hope to have books loaded onto an Ipod (it's on my birthday list). Do you upload them from disc or from the internet? Have you any good websites to share?





Here's my main source, Choisya:

http://www.audible.com/adbl/site/homepage/home.jsp?BV_SessionID=@@@@0606835279.1170873661@@@@&BV_EngineID=cccdaddkdlhjekfcefecekjdffidffj.0

i usually get the print book, too, so I don't think B&N will consider this a rival.
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Re: A Note about Editions and Quoting Shakespeare


Laurel wrote:
We took the scenic route back home just before dusk. As I listened to the poetry of Milton, Gray, and Blake, I rejoiced in the slant of the sun across Mount Baker and the rugged Canadian mountains, the gleam of the almost-full moon over the mountain, and the sheer beauty of a hundred or so trumpeter swans fresh from Siberia resting in the flooded fields and discussing family plans.



Shhh. Laurel. We don't want people to know that there are non-rainy days out here, nor that this is a beautiful place to live. They might want to move here, and we're crowded enough as it is.

Forget what Laurel wrote, folks. It is ALWAYS raining in the Pacific Northwest. By the time you've lived here a month, you have webbed feet and moss growing between your fingers. There might be some nice scenery if there were ever a day clear enough to see it, but it's fog, fog, fog 365 days of the year, so we never get to see any mountains or water or anything but gloomy grey. That's the real story; trust us, you don't want to move here.

I was off on the ferry to America yesterday, Laurel, and also listened to Brothers on my Ipod. I'm almost through Audible Part 1. Only, what, four or five to go!
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Re: A Note about Editions and Quoting Shakespeare

Oh, that was a most unusual day, I assure you, which is perhaps why I chose to write about it. It's gray and gloomy today, as usual, and I am staying home with a sore throat. Summer is predicted to be a long one this year, though, lasting from July 21 to July 25. Perhaps I shall try to get a tan. Maybe the mountain will come out again by then, too.



Everyman wrote:

Laurel wrote:
We took the scenic route back home just before dusk. As I listened to the poetry of Milton, Gray, and Blake, I rejoiced in the slant of the sun across Mount Baker and the rugged Canadian mountains, the gleam of the almost-full moon over the mountain, and the sheer beauty of a hundred or so trumpeter swans fresh from Siberia resting in the flooded fields and discussing family plans.



Shhh. Laurel. We don't want people to know that there are non-rainy days out here, nor that this is a beautiful place to live. They might want to move here, and we're crowded enough as it is.

Forget what Laurel wrote, folks. It is ALWAYS raining in the Pacific Northwest. By the time you've lived here a month, you have webbed feet and moss growing between your fingers. There might be some nice scenery if there were ever a day clear enough to see it, but it's fog, fog, fog 365 days of the year, so we never get to see any mountains or water or anything but gloomy grey. That's the real story; trust us, you don't want to move here.

I was off on the ferry to America yesterday, Laurel, and also listened to Brothers on my Ipod. I'm almost through Audible Part 1. Only, what, four or five to go!


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Re: A Note about Editions and Quoting Shakespeare

Good job, Laurel. :smileyhappy:
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Re: A Note about Editions and Quoting Shakespeare

You too are make me extremely jealous. I don't believe it about the rain...not one little bit! I've seen pictures of the northwest - looks absolutely beautiful. Especially from my viewpoint of snow, ice, and wind chills below zero! Don't know exactly where you guys are - but Seattle is 4º further north than where I am - and yet so much warmer. Our wind chill today is up to -3º while in Seattle it's a balmy 51º - and feels that temp too!



Laurel wrote:
Oh, that was a most unusual day, I assure you, which is perhaps why I chose to write about it. It's gray and gloomy today, as usual, and I am staying home with a sore throat. Summer is predicted to be a long one this year, though, lasting from July 21 to July 25. Perhaps I shall try to get a tan. Maybe the mountain will come out again by then, too.



Everyman wrote:

Laurel wrote:
We took the scenic route back home just before dusk. As I listened to the poetry of Milton, Gray, and Blake, I rejoiced in the slant of the sun across Mount Baker and the rugged Canadian mountains, the gleam of the almost-full moon over the mountain, and the sheer beauty of a hundred or so trumpeter swans fresh from Siberia resting in the flooded fields and discussing family plans.



Shhh. Laurel. We don't want people to know that there are non-rainy days out here, nor that this is a beautiful place to live. They might want to move here, and we're crowded enough as it is.

Forget what Laurel wrote, folks. It is ALWAYS raining in the Pacific Northwest. By the time you've lived here a month, you have webbed feet and moss growing between your fingers. There might be some nice scenery if there were ever a day clear enough to see it, but it's fog, fog, fog 365 days of the year, so we never get to see any mountains or water or anything but gloomy grey. That's the real story; trust us, you don't want to move here.

I was off on the ferry to America yesterday, Laurel, and also listened to Brothers on my Ipod. I'm almost through Audible Part 1. Only, what, four or five to go!





Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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Re: A Note about Editions and Quoting Shakespeare



LizzieAnn wrote:
You too are make me extremely jealous. I don't believe it about the rain...not one little bit! I've seen pictures of the northwest - looks absolutely beautiful. Especially from my viewpoint of snow, ice, and wind chills below zero! Don't know exactly where you guys are - but Seattle is 4º further north than where I am - and yet so much warmer. Our wind chill today is up to -3º while in Seattle it's a balmy 51º - and feels that temp too!




But if you think about it, there must be some reason why the Siberian trumpeter swans want to winter here. And something must have flooded the fields where they play. (Actually, I'm as far north of Seattle as I could get without being a Canadian, and Christopher's Island is just a bit south of me.)
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Choisya
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Re: A Note about Editions and Quoting Shakespeare

Thanks a lot Laurel:smileyhappy:




Laurel wrote:


Choisya wrote:
I hope to make an Ipod my next acquisition for the same reason Laurel:smileyhappy: I have a limited MP3 memory on my mobile phone, which I use for music but by the time I go on my next holiday, I hope to have books loaded onto an Ipod (it's on my birthday list). Do you upload them from disc or from the internet? Have you any good websites to share?





Here's my main source, Choisya:

http://www.audible.com/adbl/site/homepage/home.jsp?BV_SessionID=@@@@0606835279.1170873661@@@@&BV_EngineID=cccdaddkdlhjekfcefecekjdffidffj.0

i usually get the print book, too, so I don't think B&N will consider this a rival.


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Re: A Note about Editions and Quoting Shakespeare



Laurel wrote: We took the scenic route back home just before dusk. As I listened to the poetry of Milton, Gray, and Blake, I rejoiced in the slant of the sun across Mount Baker and the rugged Canadian mountains, the gleam of the almost-full moon over the mountain, and the sheer beauty of a hundred or so trumpeter swans fresh from Siberia resting in the flooded fields and discussing family plans.

Life is good! :smileyhappy:




Yay, it is so beautiful there! Can you see Mount Baker?
I was sailing outside Bellingham and I remember I had a CD with tibetan monks chanting on in my headphones, it was unreal...in that way it's like you make your own movies in your head. We went from Vancouver. So neat! Thanks for sharing. It brought back memos of a good time.

ziki
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Re: A Note about Editions and Quoting Shakespeare

Were you on a ferry or a sailboat, Ziki? My little town has awesome views of Mt. Baker. I like taking the train from Bellingham to Seattle on a clear day. The train runs just feet from the water, giving views of little oddly shaped islands and many kinds of birds, and field after field of blooming tulips in the spring. To the east are the craggy, snow-covered Cascades. Then suddenly the Olympic Mountains spring up in the west, so there are mountains on both sides, and then some gorgeous houses on the cliffs to the east. Coming back at sunset is indescribably beautiful. This trip is best done while listening to Wagner's Ring Cycle. Let me hasten to add, though, that all this is only visible on a clear day, and you know what they say about Washington's weather!



ziki wrote:


Laurel wrote: We took the scenic route back home just before dusk. As I listened to the poetry of Milton, Gray, and Blake, I rejoiced in the slant of the sun across Mount Baker and the rugged Canadian mountains, the gleam of the almost-full moon over the mountain, and the sheer beauty of a hundred or so trumpeter swans fresh from Siberia resting in the flooded fields and discussing family plans.

Life is good! :smileyhappy:




Yay, it is so beautiful there! Can you see Mount Baker?
I was sailing outside Bellingham and I remember I had a CD with tibetan monks chanting on in my headphones, it was unreal...in that way it's like you make your own movies in your head. We went from Vancouver. So neat! Thanks for sharing. It brought back memos of a good time.

ziki


"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Choisya
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Re: (Off topic) Travelling and music

Thanks for those beautiful descriptions Laurel! I have a friend in Seattle who often sends me photos of the Cascades and also tulip bulbs from the Skagit Valley - she is a professional gardener. I love the idea of listening to Wagner's Ring Cycle whilst going through it on the train - which she has also recommended me to take if I ever get to visit her, that or the ferry to Vancouver to visit another friend. I know there is no comparison but that reminded me of watching a DVD of The Sound of Music whilst coaching through Austria last year:smileyhappy:




Laurel wrote:
Were you on a ferry or a sailboat, Ziki? My little town has awesome views of Mt. Baker. I like taking the train from Bellingham to Seattle on a clear day. The train runs just feet from the water, giving views of little oddly shaped islands and many kinds of birds, and field after field of blooming tulips in the spring. To the east are the craggy, snow-covered Cascades. Then suddenly the Olympic Mountains spring up in the west, so there are mountains on both sides, and then some gorgeous houses on the cliffs to the east. Coming back at sunset is indescribably beautiful. This trip is best done while listening to Wagner's Ring Cycle. Let me hasten to add, though, that all this is only visible on a clear day, and you know what they say about Washington's weather!



ziki wrote:


Laurel wrote: We took the scenic route back home just before dusk. As I listened to the poetry of Milton, Gray, and Blake, I rejoiced in the slant of the sun across Mount Baker and the rugged Canadian mountains, the gleam of the almost-full moon over the mountain, and the sheer beauty of a hundred or so trumpeter swans fresh from Siberia resting in the flooded fields and discussing family plans.

Life is good! :smileyhappy:




Yay, it is so beautiful there! Can you see Mount Baker?
I was sailing outside Bellingham and I remember I had a CD with tibetan monks chanting on in my headphones, it was unreal...in that way it's like you make your own movies in your head. We went from Vancouver. So neat! Thanks for sharing. It brought back memos of a good time.

ziki





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Re: (Off topic) Travelling and music

Give me a ring, Choisya, and I'll join you.



Choisya wrote:
Thanks for those beautiful descriptions Laurel! I have a friend in Seattle who often sends me photos of the Cascades and also tulip bulbs from the Skagit Valley - she is a professional gardener. I love the idea of listening to Wagner's Ring Cycle whilst going through it on the train - which she has also recommended me to take if I ever get to visit her, that or the ferry to Vancouver to visit another friend. I know there is no comparison but that reminded me of watching a DVD of The Sound of Music whilst coaching through Austria last year:smileyhappy:




Laurel wrote:
Were you on a ferry or a sailboat, Ziki? My little town has awesome views of Mt. Baker. I like taking the train from Bellingham to Seattle on a clear day. The train runs just feet from the water, giving views of little oddly shaped islands and many kinds of birds, and field after field of blooming tulips in the spring. To the east are the craggy, snow-covered Cascades. Then suddenly the Olympic Mountains spring up in the west, so there are mountains on both sides, and then some gorgeous houses on the cliffs to the east. Coming back at sunset is indescribably beautiful. This trip is best done while listening to Wagner's Ring Cycle. Let me hasten to add, though, that all this is only visible on a clear day, and you know what they say about Washington's weather!



ziki wrote:


Laurel wrote: We took the scenic route back home just before dusk. As I listened to the poetry of Milton, Gray, and Blake, I rejoiced in the slant of the sun across Mount Baker and the rugged Canadian mountains, the gleam of the almost-full moon over the mountain, and the sheer beauty of a hundred or so trumpeter swans fresh from Siberia resting in the flooded fields and discussing family plans.

Life is good! :smileyhappy:




Yay, it is so beautiful there! Can you see Mount Baker?
I was sailing outside Bellingham and I remember I had a CD with tibetan monks chanting on in my headphones, it was unreal...in that way it's like you make your own movies in your head. We went from Vancouver. So neat! Thanks for sharing. It brought back memos of a good time.

ziki








"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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we went west young women (off topic)

Laurel, it was a sailing boat. I know what you mean about the mountains and views to me it looked almost unreal, like some scenery painted for a theater play. But I must say we had continuous sunshine during many weeks. That of course happend just because I was there, LOL.

ziki
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Re: we went west young women (off topic)



ziki wrote:
Laurel, it was a sailing boat. I know what you mean about the mountains and views to me it looked almost unreal, like some scenery painted for a theater play. But I must say we had continuous sunshine during many weeks. That of course happend just because I was there, LOL.

ziki




Just when I thought spring was coming, I looked out this morning to see huge, wet flakes of snow. The gras is speckled green and white now.
"Truth must of necessity be stranger than fiction, for fiction is the creation of the human mind, and therefore is congenial to it." ~~G.K. Chesterton
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Snow (off topic)

[ Edited ]
I thought it was just me! I woke up yesterday morning to something similiar. After two days of temperatures in the 40s and lots of melting snow, the temperatures dropped and laid down 6 inches of brand new white powedery snow! Ah, spring!





Laurel wrote:

Just when I thought spring was coming, I looked out this morning to see huge, wet flakes of snow. The gras is speckled green and white now.


Message Edited by LizzieAnn on 02-24-200712:55 PM

Liz ♥ ♥


Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. ~ Francis Bacon
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