Since 1997, you’ve been coming to BarnesandNoble.com to discuss everything from Stephen King to writing to Harry Potter. You’ve made our site more than a place to discover your next book: you’ve made it a community. But like all things internet, BN.com is growing and changing. We've said goodbye to our community message boards—but that doesn’t mean we won’t still be a place for adventurous readers to connect and discover.

Now, you can explore the most exciting new titles (and remember the classics) at the Barnes & Noble Book Blog. Check out conversations with authors like Jeff VanderMeer and Gary Shteyngart at the B&N Review, and browse write-ups of the best in literary fiction. Come to our Facebook page to weigh in on what it means to be a book nerd. Browse digital deals on the NOOK blog, tweet about books with us,or self-publish your latest novella with NOOK Press. And for those of you looking for support for your NOOK, the NOOK Support Forums will still be here.

We will continue to provide you with books that make you turn pages well past midnight, discover new worlds, and reunite with old friends. And we hope that you’ll continue to tell us how you’re doing, what you’re reading, and what books mean to you.

Reply
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

HAMLET: Act II (Feb. 15 - 28, 2010)

Here's a thread for focus on Act II, if you wish.  Please avoid spoilers past this act for those who've never read or seen the play before.  Thanks!

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Re: HAMLET: Act II (Feb. 15 - 28, 2010)

Act II, Scene 2, lines 201-202:

 

Polonius:  [aside] Though this be madness, yet there is method

in 't.--Will you walk ouf of the air, my lord?

 

***

 

What do you think?  Could this line be referring to more than Hamlet's appearance to Polonius?

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Contributor
Avid_Book_Reader10
Posts: 24
Registered: ‎01-03-2009
0 Kudos

Re: HAMLET: Act II (Feb. 15 - 28, 2010)

Polonius could be referring to the whole plot to see what could be troubling Hamlet: his love for Ophelia, Hamlet Sr.'s death, etc. Perhaps Polonius deep down thinks that his (and to an extent, Claudius') plan is not what he usually does when trying to ferret out information. Or is it because Polonius has used this method in finding things out, but NOT on such high-profile figures like Hamlet (he is royalty, after all), and it would be insane to try such sneaky things on the prince? Just throwing stuff out there as it comes into my head, lol.

Let books be your dining table,
And you shall be full of delights
Let them be your mattress
And you shall sleep restful nights.
~Author Unknown
Frequent Contributor
Lmfwhite
Posts: 185
Registered: ‎07-07-2008
0 Kudos

Re: HAMLET: Act II (Feb. 15 - 28, 2010)


ConnieK wrote:

Act II, Scene 2, lines 201-202:

 

Polonius:  [aside] Though this be madness, yet there is method

in 't.--Will you walk ouf of the air, my lord?

 

***

 

What do you think?  Could this line be referring to more than Hamlet's appearance to Polonius?


I have the "No Fear Shakespeare" version....the complete text of Hamlet along with a line-by-line translation.  For lines 207-210, the interpretation makes me think that Polonius genuinely believes Hamlet is mad.

 

Original:  How pregnant sometimes his replies are. A happiness that often madness hits on, which reason and sanity could not so prosperously be delivered of.

 

Translation:  He has a way with words, as crazy people often do, and that sane people don't have a talent for.

 

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: HAMLET: Act II (Feb. 15 - 28, 2010)

Polonius:  [aside] Though this be madness, yet there is method in't.

 

To me, this has always read as if Polonius is questioning whether Hamlet is mad, or is feigning madness for some purpose (i.e., according to some method). 


Will you walk ouf of the air, my lord?

 

I don't know what to do with this one, other than to wonder if Polonius is trying to use humor to uncover the "real" Hamlet.  After all, Polonius is the tool of the king.

 

 


ConnieK wrote:

Act II, Scene 2, lines 201-202:

 

Polonius:  [aside] Though this be madness, yet there is method

in 't.--Will you walk ouf of the air, my lord?

 

***

 

What do you think?  Could this line be referring to more than Hamlet's appearance to Polonius?


 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Top Kudoed Authors
Users Online
Currently online: 47 members 662 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: