Reply
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

HAMLET: The Whole Play

Here's a thread for talking about the play from anywhere, any act.  EnJOY!

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Contributor
LillyRoseSH
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎01-27-2010
0 Kudos

Re: HAMLET: The Whole Play

Here's a random thought: Horatio is the hero of the play. 

 

Well?

 

The trust worthy confidant is one of the few left standing... :smileywink:

Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: HAMLET: The Whole Play

 


LillyRoseSH wrote:

Here's a random thought: Horatio is the hero of the play. 

 

Well?

 

The trust worthy confidant is one of the few left standing... :smileywink:


 

 

Because the one who gets to tell the story is the hero?

 

Or?

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Re: HAMLET: The Whole Play


LillyRoseSH wrote:

Here's a random thought: Horatio is the hero of the play. 

 

Well?

 

The trust worthy confidant is one of the few left standing... :smileywink:


 

Interesting, Lilly--In that case, what would that make Hamlet?

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Re: HAMLET: The Whole Play

[ Edited ]

IS Hamlet mad or is he sane?  What do you think?  Is he just "sensitive"  and thoughtful in not being able to make a decision?

 

Is his indecision a flaw or a positive character trait?

 

Can you relate to Hamlet's inability or difficulty in making a decision?

 

If your father died and your mother married your uncle, and you had your doubts about murder, what would you do to try to find out what really happened? 

 

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: HAMLET: The Whole Play -- Connie's Questions

[ Edited ]

Is Hamlet mad or is he sane?  What do you think?  Is he just "sensitive"  and thoughtful in not being able to make a decision?


Although I know he is played various ways, I have always been inclined to view Hamlet as sane, but driven to the edges of insanity or mental breakdown by the environment in which he finds himself.  Yet, could a lawyer successfully make a case for temporary insanity in the killing of Polonius?  I do think Hamlet fakes insanity at times to serve his own purposes.  Also, the Orphelia is weaker and does succumb to derangement.

 

Is his indecision a flaw or a positive character trait?


Probably both.  It certainly prevents him from acting decisively, which is usually a desired characteristic of rulers and which should be developing in an heir to the throne.  Yet, it also represents some thoughtful judgment, as well as being entrenched in the mores of the time (e.g., unable to kill the king while he is at prayer).

 

Can you relate to Hamlet's inability or difficulty in making a decision?


Yes, definitely, unfortunately.  lol!

 

If your father died and your mother married your uncle, and you had your doubts about murder, what would you do to try to find out what really happened?


Fortunately, that is a decision I shall never have to make, and my imagination does not take me there.  But, I do sometimes wonder what I would do if a family member disappeared mysteriously or  catastrophically.

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Contributor
TatyyGirl
Posts: 23
Registered: ‎02-01-2009
0 Kudos

Re: HAMLET: The Whole Play

I don't believe it'd be accurate to say that Horatio is the hero of the play; the only reason he is one of the few left standing is because he was NOT a part of the disturbance in the chain of being.

 

Eg: Claudius killing King Hamlet is the start of the disturbance in the chain. By marrying Claudius, Gertrude has now shaken the order of being as well. Then, Hamlet has the right to kill Claudius, and restore order, however, he rashly attacks and kills Polonius instead. By killing Polonius, Hamlet has now lost any right he has to seek revenge. Laertes gets involved which makes him a disturbance as well. Thus, all four of them MUST die to help restore any type of order.

 

Horatio has no role in any of this other than to play the part of the only person Hamlet can really trust; also, keep in mind Horatio isn't even from Denmark, which is clear because he is unfamiliar with Denmark customs.

Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Re: HAMLET: The Whole Play

TatyyGirl wrote, in part:

I don't believe it'd be accurate to say that Horatio is the hero of the play; the only reason he is one of the few left standing is because he was NOT a part of the disturbance in the chain of being.

 

Welcome, TatyyGirl, if I haven't welcomed you before! 

 

I think you make a good point.  Hamlet asks Horatio to "tell his story," but does that make him the hero, that he survived all the killings and lives to tell us the story?  The "hero" is usually the same person as the main character, the protagonist, if you will, who definitely seems like the prince himself in this case.

 

I like thinking of other options and possibilities, though, and am open to discussing this further.

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: HAMLET: The Whole Play

LillyRoseSH wrote:

Here's a random thought: Horatio is the hero of the play. 

 

Well?


 


Is LillyRose still around for this on-going discussion on the role of Horatio?

 

 

ConnieK wrote:

TatyyGirl wrote, in part:

I don't believe it'd be accurate to say that Horatio is the hero of the play; the only reason he is one of the few left standing is because he was NOT a part of the disturbance in the chain of being.

 

Welcome, TatyyGirl, if I haven't welcomed you before! 

 

I think you make a good point.  Hamlet asks Horatio to "tell his story," but does that make him the hero, that he survived all the killings and lives to tell us the story?  The "hero" is usually the same person as the main character, the protagonist, if you will, who definitely seems like the prince himself in this case.

 

I like thinking of other options and possibilities, though, and am open to discussing this further.

 

 

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Distinguished Bibliophile
Peppermill
Posts: 6,768
Registered: ‎04-04-2007
0 Kudos

Re: HAMLET: The Whole Play

OOPs! text is getting cut off on the right hand side of the previous post in the quotations (e.g., NOT has become NO).  Am I the only one seeing this, or is this happening to others as well?

 

Pepper

"Seize the moments of happiness, love and be loved! That is the only reality in the world, all else is folly. It is the one thing we are interested in here." -- Leo Tolstoy
Author
ConnieAnnKirk
Posts: 5,472
Registered: ‎06-14-2007
0 Kudos

Re: HAMLET: The Whole Play

Peppermill wrote:

OOPs! text is getting cut off on the right hand side of the previous post in the quotations (e.g., NOT has become NO).  Am I the only one seeing this, or is this happening to others as well?

 

Pepper

 

Hmm.  It does look like some quotes within quotes are getting cut off on the right.

~ConnieAnnKirk




[CAK's books , website.]
Contributor
TatyyGirl
Posts: 23
Registered: ‎02-01-2009
0 Kudos

Re: HAMLET: The Whole Play

 

ConnieK wrote:

TatyyGirl wrote, in part:

I don't believe it'd be accurate to say that Horatio is the hero of the play; the only reason he is one of the few left standing is because he was NOT a part of the disturbance in the chain of being.

 

Welcome, TatyyGirl, if I haven't welcomed you before! 

 

I think you make a good point.  Hamlet asks Horatio to "tell his story," but does that make him the hero, that he survived all the killings and lives to tell us the story?  The "hero" is usually the same person as the main character, the protagonist, if you will, who definitely seems like the prince himself in this case.

 

I like thinking of other options and possibilities, though, and am open to discussing this further.

 

 

 

:] Thank you for the welcoming!

Correspondent
friery
Posts: 209
Registered: ‎10-19-2006
0 Kudos

Re: HAMLET: As Seen by James Joyce

We shouldn't leave Hamlet without mentioning James Joyce's treatment of the play in his great novel Ulysses.  In a nutshell, Stephen Dedalus posits that Shakespeare is his own father:

 

-- The play begins. A player comes on under the shadow, made up in the castoff mail of a court buck, a wellset man with a bass voice. It is the ghost, the king, a king and no king, and the player is Shakespeare who has studied Hamlet all the years of his life which were not vanity in order to play the part of the spectre. He speaks the words to Burbage, the young player who stands before him beyond the rack of cerecloth, calling him by a name:

Hamlet, I am thy father's spirit


bidding him list. To a son he speaks, the son of his soul, the prince, young Hamlet and to the son of his body, Hamnet Shakespeare, who has died in Stratford that his namesake may live for ever.

-- Is it possible that that player Shakespeare, a ghost by absence, and in the vesture of buried Denmark, a ghost by death, speaking his own words to his own son's name (had Hamnet Shakespeare lived he would have been prince Hamlet's twin) is it possible, I want to know, or probable that he did not draw or foresee the logical conclusion of those premises: you are the dispossessed son: I am the murdered father: your mother is the guilty queen. Ann Shakespeare, born Hathaway?

Top Kudoed Authors
Users Online
Currently online:113 members 743 guests
Please welcome our newest community members: